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Silly Tax Stories and Strange Tax Deductions You Should Know

Tax time is here and hopefully, you’ve already filed. We also hope you don’t run into any of these wacky tax situations! Make sure you get expert help filing if you don’t know what you’re doing. No one wants to mess with the IRS, and you want to maximize the amount you can get back or keep for your financial goals.

 

Clean eating isn’t deductible, no matter how healthy.

You can’t deduct money you spend on a healthy diet as a medical expense. John Kane, CPA, reported at Credit.com that a client tried to deduct the cost of the family’s foods. Sure, the groceries were non-processed and healthy, but that doesn’t make them count as a medical expense. Sorry!

 

Negative numbers don’t count.

Some people have tried to use negative numbers on their tax return, maybe innocently thinking that’s what you’re supposed to do. But according to the IRS, you’re supposed to use “0” in any instance where you have a negative amount.

 

What is a “Good” Credit Score Anyway?

 

Go old school with pen and paper.

Many millennials live abroad or would like to in the near future. Did you know that you may not be able to file electronically if you are a US citizen and live outside of the country? Expats may find that they have to fill out the long forms because electronic forms require a US address.

 

Buying a business? Hire a tax expert.

It’s super important to have the right experts and legal help on your side when you’re starting a business endeavor. One reason is successor liability. There are certain business debts or payments that you might not be responsible for, but back taxes don’t go away so easily. People can get burned by IRS liens if they don’t check to see what kind of taxes the business owes.

 

What kind of employee are you? It matters—a lot!

Some businesses wrongly categorize their employees as independent contractors. In the case of a youth soccer association, they got in trouble with the IRS for requiring the referees to file as independent contractors. Businesses that aren’t following labor laws when it comes to tax filing could face big fines.

 

Don’t try to hide from the IRS.

Just as a general tip, don’t try to dodge or outsmart the IRS. That’s a really bad idea. The IRS can go into your bank accounts with a levy if you owe taxes for long enough, so there’s no point in trying to hide. Working with them ASAP when you realize that you owe taxes is your best bet. You can probably set up payments, but only if you are on the ball.

Wondering about some of the wackier tax deductions? There are plenty!

 

  • Moving for work? Your expenses could be tax deductible, including moving Fido. Don’t forget to keep track of expenses for moving your pets. When it comes time to list dependents, stick to human dependents only. People have tried to deduct pets, but that’s a no-go!
  • If you’ve got a guard dog for your business, on the other hand, Cujo’s upkeep would be a tax-deductible business expense. If you are trying to deduct the miniature guard dog that protects your house, you’re out of luck.
  • Pools can increase your homeowner’s insurance and cost a pretty penny to maintain. Did you know that having a medical condition that’s helped by swimming or water therapy could mean your pool expenses are tax deductible?
  • You may not be able to deduct your grocery costs because you like clean eating. You may be in luck if you’re working with a doctor to do things like lower your cholesterol and BMI. If you’re making adjustments as part of a health plan, there might be ways to deduct some of those costs. Check with your tax pro!
  • Just FYI, you’re supposed to pay taxes on income even if it was attained as part of a crime or doing something illegal. Not that we’re making any accusations!
  • Trying to kick the habit? Supplies you use to quit smoking can be tax deductible, too. Just another reason to quit!

 

 

6 Ways to Use Your Federal Tax Return

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

What you Need to Know About College Scholarships: Part I

Paying for College? Here’s Where to Find College Scholarships

 

So you’re going to college. That’s great! But now you need to find a way to pay for it. Lots of people have a successful college career by borrowing student loans for college, but scholarships for college can help lessen the amount you need to borrow. Here are some things you need to know about college scholarships and how to find them.

 

When should I search for college scholarships?

 

One of the most important things to know about searching for scholarships for college is that you should start early to make sure you’re meeting deadlines. The sooner you start looking for aid, the better. You want to be top of the pile when it comes time to apply, and you don’t want to miss out because you were late on a deadline. If you are late to apply to a scholarship deadline, chances are they won’t accept your submission.

 

If you know what degree you want and where you’ll be going to school, it cuts out the guesswork. Your degree and school will heavily impact how much you’ll pay for college.  Any amount of schooling that can be paid for by a scholarship will be the best option. If you’re earlier in the process, here are some helpful figures on the average cost:

 

What does it cost to go to school?

 

School costs vary widely depending on multiple factors. Factors that impact schools costs include your degree, choice of school, and the type of field you’re going into. You may also be able to work while going to school, which can lower the cost.

 

Degree Type

Average Cost – Public Average Cost – Private
Associate’s Degree – Two Year[1] $3,570 $14,587
Bachelor’s Degree – Four Year[2] $102,352 $250,576–$341,184

(For-profit vs. Not-for-profit)

Master’s Degree[3] From $30,000 to $120,000, depending on the program and school
Doctorate[4] From $15,000 to $50,000, depending on the program and school

 

 

What should I look for in a college scholarship?

 

Scholarship qualifications can vary significantly based on the person or organization that created it. You might have to keep up a religious commitment or affiliation, meet performance requirements, or prove you are completing projects or work. Most commonly scholarships require that you need to maintain a certain grade point average and enrollment status. Don’t be surprised if other stipulations apply to a scholarship. It’s important to know the details when considering if you should apply or accept scholarships for college.

Secondly, you also need to look into how you are allowed to use the funds. Some scholarships cover strictly academic fees. Others scholarships may be used for room and board or general living expenses. Know the restrictions on funds before you accept any financial aid. The last thing you want to do is risk losing the money or having to pay it back.

Finally, be sure to find out what the worst case scenario might be. If you change programs or don’t achieve the grade you needed, what happens? It’s nothing that should scare you away from scholarships, but you need to know. Knowing if you’ll be on the hook later if something goes wrong is important.

 

Federal Scholarships

The U.S. Department of Education has lots of tips on finding federal student aid and federal scholarships. Be sure you start your scholarship search for college at studentaid.ed.gov. In order to avoid taking out student loans for college, checking with government programs is a must. An added bonus is that the details and requirements are pretty clearly laid out. Using the U.S. Department of Education website is usually a quick search that’s easier to do, so we’d recommend starting your scholarship search there.

 

College Scholarship Categories

There are lots of different categories of scholarships. Here are some of the main ones you might qualify for. Narrowing down your search to a category can really help you focus on what applies to you and make your search more effective.

 

Scholarships for Academic Excellence (or even average performance)

As you can imagine, the top academic scholarships are highly competitive and only apply to the tip-top of high-performing students. Very few of us fall into that category. The good news is that whether you’re an ace or have more typical grades, you can still search for scholarships based on the level you’ve achieved in school and see if you qualify.

 

Athletic Scholarships

Are you good at a sport or activity? Search for those scholarships! From chess to volleyball to football and soccer, there are scholarships for lots of different types of athletes.

 

Legacy Scholarships

Your parents might have a connection to a university or organization that offers scholarships. Ask around the family and see if you can make that connection.

 

Military Scholarships

Most people are aware that the military offers money for college. There are lots of options from military reserves up to enlisting for a few years of full-time military membership. Check out this list of military scholarships and aid for active duty service members and veterans.

 

Scholarships for Parents

Single parents, working parents, and young parents are just some of the people who might qualify for this type of scholarship. Lots of organizations and schools want to promote education for all members of the community, and sending parents to school (or back to school) might make you their prime applicant.

 

Scholarships for Minorities

Scholarships for minorities often come from community organizations, colleges, and institutions, or even national and global groups that want to promote education for your ethnic or cultural group. Search this type of scholarships for college to learn more.

 

Scholarships for Women

Similarly to scholarships for minorities and parents, women often face barriers to attending school at higher rates than men. Scholarships for women offer extra help to make sure educating women is a priority.

 

Creative or Writing Scholarships

Essay contests, portfolio reviews, and performance arts-based scholarships exist for students in the arts. They often vary based on the school and focus of study, but there are many available. Don’t pass up searching for scholarships if you’re going into the arts or humanities, or even if you are a good essay writer and want to search for writing opportunities that might help you get a scholarship for college.

 

Community Service Scholarships

Community service covers a huge array of possibilities. If you’re passionate about helping your community, see if you can get involved with some projects, start one of your own, or search community service scholarships now to see what you could be doing that would make you eligible.

 

Unusual Scholarships

From scholarships for tall women to people with red hair to fans of HAM radio, there are all kinds of unusual scholarships for college out there. Check out lists like this one at Scholarships.com to see what you might qualify for that you never would have thought of!

 

Look for Upcoming Parts to This Guide

If you’re looking for scholarships for college because you want to save on your student loans for college, we’ll be posting more information soon to help guide you!

 

Jobs to Reduce Student Loans for College

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites

Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

 

[1] https://www.studentdebtrelief.us/news/average-cost-of-college-2018/

[2] https://www.campusexplorer.com/college-advice-tips/E66537B4/Costs-Of-A-Bachelor-s-Degree-Program/

[3] https://www.bestmastersdegrees.com/best-masters-degrees-faq/how-much-does-a-masters-degree-cost

[4] https://study.com/articles/How_Much_Does_a_Doctorate_Degree_Cost.html

What College Major is Right for You?

When going to college, one of the most asked questions is, “What’s your major?” For a college student, a major can feel like it defines your career path and your future endeavors. A major can put a lot of pressure on a college student, to pick something fast and stick with it. On the other hand, many college students come into their first year not knowing what they want to study, or where they see themselves. The good news is that is OKAY. There are many things you can do to find a major that suits you and your values. Here is a list of things you can do to help find a college major that is tailored to you:

  1. Get to know yourself

This decision requires you to learn a little about yourself. Maybe start with a personality test. The Myers-Brigg personality test will help you determine what characteristics you have, what you like and dislike, and even suggest work environments that may fit your persona. The Myers-Brigg gives examples of what other people with your personality type succeed in.

Another way to learn about yourself is by evaluating yourself in a S.W.O.T. analysis. The S.W.O.T. stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. List a few things relating to yourself under each column to help you match your abilities to a major that is right for you. Examine your interest, values, and potentials for a major that fits your personality.

  1. Create Goals

After college where do you see yourself? Where do you see yourself 5 years after graduation? What about 10? These can be as detailed or as generalized as you like but setting goals and preparing for them helps when finding a major. Creating short and long term goals help to know what you would like to see in your future and what steps may be necessary to get there. Be sure when you are setting goals for yourself that they are achievable. If your goals are too unrealistic, you may feel discouraged and quit. Some people find writing their goals down on a piece of paper helps to make them more permanent.

  1. Do your Research

Look at majors offered at your college of choice and do some research. There is so much information on the internet. You can also talk with a guidance counselor too if you’re looking for further insight and assistance.  When researching a major you’ll want to take into account the type of career you’ll have with that major. Some questions you may want to ask include what jobs are out there and how sustainable are they.

A four-year university can be expensive. You may find yourself borrowing student loans and receiving financial aid to afford education. Regardless of the major you choose, you need to verify the major and career path have a return on your investment. If you’re borrowing student loans when you graduate you’ll need to pay those back upon graduating. Once you receive your first career job you want to be financially responsible. You should be able to start paying down that student loan debt without having to eat Ramen® every night. Unless you really like Ramen®. When researching consider if the job has long term potential, look at the average salary, and consider location and necessities. A major can lead to many careers, but finding one that can support your future goals and lifestyle is important.

  1. Find a Mentor

Explore some of the options available for the majors you’re interested in and make a few cold calls. Your university may have a directory of alumni who graduated in your field of choice. Call them to find out about their career, day-to-day task, what to expect, and things that make them happy at their job. You can even consider shadowing or interning with alumni to find out if this career path is something you want to consider.

Try paying a visit to a college advisor. Most colleges provide separate advisors depending on the major. Make an appointment where you can sit down with them and discuss course load, professors and future employers with your major of interest. College advisors can help you decide if you can tackle a major on an academic level as well as real-world experience. Before you make the investment of attending college you want to be sure that you are pursuing the right career path for yourself.

  1. Seek Advice

Utilize people within your network and ask them for advice and guidance. Ask friends what they are considering for a major. People in classes may be a good resource for you as well. See what they are planning to study in college and what their interests are. You could even talk to a parent or someone you trust about your values and ideas. The people who are close to you may have your best interest and connections that can help with your decision.

Lastly, going into college not knowing what major to pursue is NORMAL. Do not rush into a major because you don’t want to be behind. Deciding a major a semester late or even changing majors does not always effect graduation dates. The goal of attending college is to gain the skills and education that could lead you to something you will succeed in. As you continue to learn more about college understand how you will handle it financially. It can seem overwhelming, but understanding what your finances are and what you’ll need to be making upon graduation will be helpful.

 

10 Facts About Student Loans That Will Save You Money

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

The Best Ways To Engage Millennials At Work

Just ask!

As of 2019, millennials are roughly between the ages of 23 and 37. Many millennial employees are nearing their late 30s and likely have good work experience and instincts. Even younger millennials are pretty business-savvy as they’re used to reading about their field and Googling questions to make sure they’re informed. With these traits in their favor, millennials can be a good second set of eyes to give you another point of view on a decision or project brief. Get their opinions or help with decision-making to broaden your perspective and to help raise buy-in.

 

Give regular feedback.

In the era of ghosting and impersonal communication, many professional millennials yearn for up-to-date information on where they stand. Whether this a one-on-one, review or just feedback in general, they want to know their status at work. The approval of supervisors can mean a lot to this demographic. Millennials tend to work hard to meet and even exceed their professional goals. Your job in this process is to let them know when they are on track, ahead, or behind. No hand-holding needed: just don’t let them be in the dark about progress and they will be happy for the engagement.

 

Stick to a predictable review process.

Along with being available for regular feedback and check-ins, millennial employees count on a predictable review process for a few reasons. Millennials want the opportunity to shine, and that’s not possible if they don’t have face time with leadership, especially supervisors who may not be involved in their regular projects. If their job doesn’t require even semi-frequent check-ins, regular feedback likely won’t be enough to let them know how they’re performing. Plus, following a set schedule and using a standardized system for assessment takes away any chance of ambiguity or uncertainty.

 

Connect with their values.

Millennials want to feel like they’re doing something to improve their community. This drive to “save the world” even in small ways is because they grew up learning to take care of the environment and people around us. Companies can drive engagement by giving millennials a way to get involved with company initiatives that fit their values. That could be coordinating off-site events and team-building for a purpose. Get millennials engaged in internal campaigns like adopting a comprehensive recycling strategy, or finding vendors who are local or minority-owned. Sustainable initiatives can be a big hit among this crowd while also saving money. Think about how you can connect things like lowering shipping costs with lighter packaging or using recycled materials.

 

Give them a challenging goal.

Most millennials want to feel valued and adept at their jobs. It’s important to be proud of what you do and feel like you’re making an important contribution. The best way to attain that fulfillment is to reach your goals. The nice thing about setting challenging goals to engage your millennial employees is that you also get to see them make amazing progress. You also get to watch them develop skills that are important to their role on your team. Instead of telling someone to wing it or figure it out. Management can engage employees by working together to set up the challenge. The employee will be tasked with the dirty work of getting down to business and making it happen.

 

Make them the lead on a project or initiative.

You might find that you get better engagement out of younger employees by putting them in charge of something. Many millennials want the chance to show what they’re made of. What better way to do that than to take responsibility for something? You’ll never know what your people are made of if they don’t occasionally get to prove their abilities. That doesn’t mean you have to take a big risk, but let them know what their responsibility is. Why could their performance mean a lot for their reputation or respect? You will likely be surprised.

 

Offer career and personal development opportunities.

With millennials poised to make up 75% of the workforce by 2020, helping prepare them to take over is critical to your company’s success. Good news, millennials want to do the kind of professional development that will make them ready! As employees start to think about a retirement plan, you don’t want to let all of that experience and prowess walk out the door. Consider offering development for millennial employees. This can help keep them engaged and strengthen the company’s transition from one generation of leaders to another. Don’t forget about personal development opportunities, too. Plenty of organizations can partner with you to offer workshops on life management or volunteer opportunities. People will find workshops and volunteer opportunities personally valuable. These opportunities will help them be better employees even if they’re not working directly on building a career skill.

 

Keep open communication.

Finally, the biggest thing you can do to keep millennials engaged is, communicate. This generation might be guilty of relying on emojis at times, but they hate guessing and value honesty. Find ways to facilitate conversations both big picture planning and everyday updates and time for open feedback.

 

5 Benefits Millennials Look For

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

Medical Match Day Finance Tips

Congratulations you’ve worked hard been through multiple interviews and finally, your hard work has paid off! You’ve been matched and you’re getting ready for residency. It’s so exciting to jump into residency and see what having this career will really be like. You’ll have the ability to learn from experienced professionals in your field of interest. Getting yourself prepared for your residency can feel stressful, but it doesn’t need to be. Here are some financial tips to help you get settled and make good choices for your future.

 

Set Up Loan Payments

Once you are done with school, you should start paying on student loans. Residency can take several years to complete. It’s likely that your residency isn’t paying you what a full-time position in your career will so all the medical school debt that’s accumulated, can be difficult to sort through. If you find yourself with a large amount of federal student loan debt, look into income-based repayment plans. We would recommend this as a temporary solution until you’ve completed your residency program.  This will assure that you’re making student loan payments towards your medical school debt, but that those payments are not impossible to complete. You may eventually qualify for public loan forgiveness on your federal student loans. If you qualify to get on an IBR plan in residency after completing the program you may only have a few years remaining.

 

 

If you also have private student loans there is no need to worry. Most private student loan lenders will work with you to offer some type of payment plan. You may want to consider refinancing your medical student loan debt. In order to qualify for student loan refinancing, you may need to add a cosigner due to income you’ll be making in your residency. Regardless of which route you chose, in the first few months after graduation, you’ll want to have your payment plan set up. Don’t let this task fall off your radar—in-school deferment ends shortly after graduation for most kinds of medical school debt.

 

How to Reduce Medical School Debt

 

 

Make a Budget

The average income for first-year medical residents is about $55,000, according to a recent report. That money may not go very far with your loan payments and other living expenses. It’s crucial to set your budget and stick to it. Many medical professionals suggest living with roommates, carpooling, using public transit, and setting a budget to keep other spending at a minimum.

 

 

Look Into Your Benefits

If you’re starting off pretty frugal until you get accustomed to your new budget, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t think about saving for the future. When it comes to saving for retirement, the sooner the better. Employer matches and retirement programs should be on your list of things to do early in your residency. Take advantage of match money for retirement if your employer offers it. Match money from your employer is free money! Don’t miss out on that opportunity, and check out the rest of your benefits while you’re at it. There are usually several perks and programs you can look into that might help make your transition to residency more comfortable.

 

Set Up Housing

Speaking of housing arrangements, there is conflicting advice on whether or not it makes sense to buy a home vs. renting while in residency. Since most residents spend long hours working and don’t have time for household maintenance or upkeep, buying a home can be a difficult choice. Plus knowing that you might not choose to live in the same place long term cause many experts to advise renting. Look at your unique situation and make sure you’re weighing all of these factors when you decide what to do for housing.

 

As far as finding somewhere to live, location will probably be top of your list. After working long hours and several days in a row, having a long commute is the last thing you want. If the area near your work is not cost-effective, look for ways to get connected with a good roommate or two. Research the area before you relocate and stick to your budget for housing costs so that you don’t end up being rent-poor or house-poor.

 

Practice Self-Care and Routine

Residency can be engrossing. You’re so involved in your work role and in living the life of a busy resident, that it’s not uncommon to let self-care fall by the wayside. Remember, you can’t care for others if you haven’t cared for yourself. Make sure you’re doing what you can to stick to healthy habits, even if there are days you’re low on sleep or not making the best food choices. Getting rest on your time off, enjoying your hobbies even in small doses, and exercising or meal planning can help make sure you’re cared for even with a busy schedule.

 

Enjoy your new life adventure!

 

Ways to Save on Student Loan Debt During Residency

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

Student Loan Refinancing: How To Avoid Predatory Lending

No one wants to get scammed, but it can be hard to feel confident about whether you’re working with a reputable source or not. In an era when we have access to so many different options and there are countless financial entities available at our fingertips, there are definitely some things to keep in mind so that you don’t end up getting a raw deal.  It’s not uncommon if you’re interested in student loan refinancing, or have been approached by a company to want to see if they’re legit before you move forward. Here are some tips on how to avoid being a victim of predatory lending.

 

Check your sources.

It’s not uncommon to find random financing offers around the internet. Maybe you read about it on Reddit, saw a social media post, or even direct mail. Companies regularly send postcards and mailers to try to get your attention. The marketing material can look pretty convincing, too! Don’t let a slick landing page or a nice mailer fool you. You generally want to find suggestions from sources you trust, like a financial expert, or trusted online sources. A good resource would be the Better Business Bureau. You can see online complaints, information about the company, and all provided by an unbiased source. A second site that provides unbiased online reviews is Trustpilot. Websites with unbiased reviews and legitimate accreditation or backing can be an ideal source to verify credibility.

 

Never trust dishonest marketing.

It may sound extreme, but we’ve heard of examples where someone was approached by an entity that attempted to look like the government. These scare tactics are used frequently enough by scammy companies for one reason – they work. These companies use this scare tactic because when you think the government is trying to get in touch and you’re in trouble, you answer! These options work similarly to the IRS scams that are always happening with the IRS calling your phone, but in reality, the IRS doesn’t actually call anyone. If the company tried to look like a government program and later you find out they’re not, drop them. A legitimate company won’t send fake notices or use a misleading URL in order to get your business.

 

Listen to the old adage.

If it’s too good to be true, it probably is. There’s a reason that this simple advice is so often passed down. Really amazing offers are rare. If something sounds like there’s no way they could offer you such incredible terms or that great of a deal, there is likely fine print that’s missing. Fact check the offer and look for comparable data. Your alarm bells should go off if you’re looking at a company whose reputation is dubious. This especially proves true if they’re claiming to get you unheard of service or savings.

 

Requirements to Refinance Student Loans

 

What do I owe you?

There are lots of scams across all kinds of industries. One of the most common is when a person tries to get you to pay something up front with the promise of services to come. Lending is no different. If you have to pay a fee or anything before you can see the offer, chances are that this is a scam. Companies often will offer to facilitate student loan discharge for someone with a permanent disability. The process of applying for student loan discharge if you have a qualifying disability is free. Any company offering to do it for a hefty up-front fee is scamming you!

 

Avoid anyone who is too aggressive.

Sometimes a company will aggressively pursue potential borrowers and push them to select a consolidation option that’s not in the borrower’s best financial interest. They might be a legitimate company but will leave out crucial details in order to sign you up. A good general rule of thumb is to be aware of the interest rate and terms. Understand how a lower payment can extend the life of your loans, thus increasing the overall amount due. Always get all the details, so you know the financial implications of your decision.

 

Give it a gut check.

Sometimes your intuition is your best tool. If something doesn’t feel right, don’t be afraid to hit pause until you can find more information. Be wary of any company that’s asking for too much personal information before you are sure that they’re legit. Keep an eye out for things that just don’t seem right, like misspellings or a digital presence that seems fishy. You should never be faulted or made to feel bad for giving yourself time to look into the details and read everything over. If you feel like you’re being hurried through or your questions aren’t being answered stop and take a breather to do a gut check. All of your concerns should be addressed with ample information so that you feel confident about the process and decision. If that’s not what you’re experiencing, you should back away.

 

Use your village.

There are lots of reputable companies out there, and it’s pretty easy to find them by reading unbiased reviews. Do your research and continue learning more about how their process will help you. Use resources available to you to vet companies before you reach out. If you utilize the resources available to you, you’ll be less likely to encounter an unreputable company on the prowl.

You should never be badgered or threatened.

No reputable company is going to make threats against you or repeatedly harass you to sign up. As a consumer, you have certain protections and any company that violates these should be investigated. If you’re facing this treatment from any lender, would like to see more information on various types of financial products and your rights, visit the FDIC website.

 

 

Check Out Our Guide to Student Loan Refinancing

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

What Credit Score is Considered “Good”? What to know about Credit Scores

This guest post was provided by Debt MD ®, a free service that connects consumers with the professional help they need to become debt-free. Debt MD aims to make the path to financial freedom as quick, simple, and stress-free as possible.

A good credit score is becoming more important. A good credit score illustrates to lenders that you are a responsible borrower. There are three major credit bureaus that report on your credit history and determine your credit score.  The higher your credit score, the more you’ve established yourself as a responsible borrower. The higher your credit score the more likely it will be to receive favorable interest rates and loan terms.

 

Did you know credit scores can be requested from other organizations outside of the financial industry? Credit scores not only illustrate responsibility as a borrower but provide a snapshot of how you handle finances. When you want to establish services like a phone, utilities, insurance, or even rent an apartment, providers look at your credit score. This allows them to choose whether they should allow you to obtain their service or not. Even employers are now looking at credit reports prior to hiring someone.

 

Who Determines a Credit Score? 

What’s a three-digit number that can either make or break your financial deal? Yes, you got it right, it’s your credit score! There are several different types of credit scores generated using your credit report. So, in simplicity, you determine your credit score, since you control how you utilize your credit and finances.

 

A credit report is just that a report on your credit history. It includes details regarding credit card payments, loan payments, and the status of each. Your Credit Score is then calculated using your credit report. Most commonly used is the FICO® score developed by the Fair Isaac Corporation.

 

What Makes Up a Credit Score?

 

The FICO® Score is the most widely used credit scoring model. In fact, according to Fair Isaac Corporation FICO® Scores are used in 90% of United States credit lending decisions. FICO® Scores are calculated using five main parts of your credit report. The FICO® Score utilizes amounts owed, new credit, length of credit history, payment, history, and credit mix to calculate your personal score.  Each category represents a percentage as illustrated on the chart below, to create your full FICO® Score.

 

What’s a Good Credit Score?

 

We now know what a credit score is, what attributes to it, and the main type of credit score used throughout the lending industry, but what is a “good” credit score? Generally, FICO® Scores range from 300 to 850.

 

Here is a look at the FICO® Score ranges and their equivalent rating.

 

Credit Score Range: Rating

300 to 579: Very Poor

580 to 669: Fair

670 to 739: Good

740 to 799: Very Good

800 to 850: Exceptional

 

It is important to note that a “good” credit score cut-off will vary depending on the type of financial institution that you are dealing with. For instance, if you are applying for a mortgage loan, to qualify your score typically must fall between 700 and 759. To qualify for an auto loan your score would ideally be above 740, and to get the best rewards credit card you typically should have a score of 720. If you’re looking to refinance student loan debt you’ll likely be required to have a 650 credit score or higher.

 

It’s important to recognize that lenders do not solely base their decision on credit scores. In addition to your credit score, lenders may look at your credit history, debt-to-income ratio, assets, and liabilities to determine if you’re a good risk or not. The higher your credit score the better, as it illustrates your reliability as a borrower hence presenting a lower risk to the organization. When a person has a higher credit score they likely will be presented better borrowing options due to their credit history.

 

How To Find Your Credit Score?

Checking your annual credit report regularly is one of the most important habits to develop. This is especially true if you want to improve your credit score. By verifying your credit record, you’ll be able to check for errors and discrepancies and dispute them when applicable.

 

Checking your credit reports will also help you to recognize signs of identity theft, which is becoming more prevalent. You can get your credit report at no cost once every 12 months from each of the three widely recognized credit bureaus (Equifax ®, Experian ® and TransUnion ®) from AnnualCreditReport.com.

 

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