ELFI is monitoring the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak and following guidance from state and federal agencies. If you have been impacted by the Coronavirus, our Customer Care Center is available to help you.
×
TAGS
Student Loan Refinancing

7 Common Student Loan Refinancing Questions Answered

January 16, 2020

By Kat Tretina

Kat Tretina is a freelance writer based in Orlando, Florida. Her work has been featured in publications like The Huffington Post, Entrepreneur, and more. She is focused on helping people pay down their debt and boost their income.

 

If you have student loan debt, you know how painful interest charges can be. High interest rates can cause your loan balance to grow over time, forcing you to repay thousands more than you originally borrowed.

 

Student loan refinancing 1 is a strategy you can use to manage your debt and save money. In fact, ELFI customers have reported that they see an average savings of $13,940 after refinancing their student loans2.

 

However, there are questions about student loan refinancing out there that may be preventing you from submitting a loan application. Here are some of the most common questions — and answers — you should know about.

 

1. Does refinancing student loans cost money?

One of the biggest myths is that refinancing student loans is expensive. And that’s because student loan refinancing is often confused with other forms of refinancing, such as refinancing mortgages. While refinancing a mortgage does involve closing costs, student loan refinancing should not.

 

Plus, most lenders don’t charge any application or origination fees. And with Education Loan Finance, there are no prepayment penalties, so you’re free to pay off your new loan as soon as you’d like.

 

2. How long does it take to qualify for student loan refinancing?

Some forms of loans can take months to process, but student loan refinancing is different. You can complete the application in minutes, and you can do everything online. Once you submit your application, the lender will review your information and make a decision. In most cases, you’ll find out whether or not you’re approved in as little as one business day.

 

If approved, the lender will work to disburse your loan. It can take a few days to a few weeks for that process to be completed, so keep making payments on your current debt until you receive a notification that the loan was disbursed. If you refinance your student loan with ELFI, you’ll have a personal loan advisor who will be your guide throughout the entire process.

 

3. Is savings from refinancing student loan debt significant?

You may think that student loan refinancing isn’t worth the work because it won’t save enough money for you. But taking just a few minutes to submit a refinancing application can help you save thousands over your loan repayment term.

 

For example, let’s say you had $30,000 in loans at 7.08% interest — the current rate for federal PLUS Loans.  If you repaid your loans over the course of 10 years, your monthly payment would be $350. In total, you’d pay $41,948 by the end of your repayment term; interest charges would add nearly $12,000 to your loan balance.

 

Use ELFI’s student loan refinance calculator1 to find out how much money you can save by refinancing your debt.

 

4. Will refinancing student loans affect my credit?

Some people hold off on student loan refinancing because they’re afraid it will damage their credit. However, lenders like ELFI allow you to get a rate quote (prequalify) with just a soft credit inquiry, which doesn’t affect your credit score.

 

If you find a quote that works for you and submit a refinancing application, the lender will then complete a hard credit inquiry, which can impact your credit. However, the effect is usually minimal. According to myFICO — the organization behind the FICO credit score — one hard credit inquiry will typically take less than five points off your FICO credit score.

 

5. Is refinancing federal student loans a good idea?

If you have federal student loans, you may have heard that refinancing your debt isn’t a good idea. However, that’s not the case for everyone.

 

When you refinance your loans, you will lose out on federal benefits like income-driven repayment plans and loan forgiveness. But those perks are only valuable if you’d actually use them. If you make too much money or don’t work in a qualifying field, you wouldn’t be able to take advantage of those programs.

 

If you can afford your monthly payments and feel secure in your job, refinancing your federal student loans can help you save money and become debt-free sooner.

 

6. Do only federal student loans have forbearance or deferment programs?

A big perk of the federal loans is the ability to enter into forbearance or deferment. With these options, you can postpone making payments on your debt without entering into default.

 

Few refinancing lenders offer forbearance benefits. However, there are some exceptions. With ELFI, you may be able to postpone your payments for up to 12 months if you’re facing a financial hardship, such as a job loss or medical emergency. That period can give you time to get back on your feet before you have to worry about making payments.

 

7. Can I refinance student loans more than once?

If you already refinanced your loans once, you may think you’re out of luck, and you’re stuck with your current interest rate. However, there’s no limit to how many times you can refinance your loans.

 

If your credit score improves or you get a raise at work, you can refinance your loans again to see if you qualify for a lower interest rate. As you progress in your career and your finances stabilize, refinancing multiple times can help you pay off your debt even faster.

 

Refinancing your student loans

While student loan refinancing can be an effective way to manage your debt, there are a lot of myths and misinformation out there. Now that these common questions have been answered, you can move forward with the refinancing process with confidence.

 

Use ELFI’s Find My Rate tool to get a rate quote without affecting your credit score1.

 


 

1 Education Loan Finance is a nationwide student loan debt consolidation and refinance program offered by Tennessee based SouthEast Bank. ELFI is designed to assist borrowers through consolidating and refinancing loans into one single loan that effectively lowers your cost of education debt and/or makes repayment very simple. Subject to credit approval. See Terms & Conditions. The interest rate and monthly payment for a variable rate loan may increase after closing, but will never exceed 9.95% APR. For example, a 10-year loan with a fixed rate of 6% would have 120 payments of $11.00 per $1,000 borrowed. Rates are subject to change.

 

2 Average savings calculations are based on information provided by SouthEast Bank/ Education Loan Finance customers who refinanced their student loans between 2/7/2020 and 2/21/2020. While these amounts represent reported average amounts saved, actual amounts saved will vary depending upon a number of factors.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Person reading news about student loans in coffee shop
2020-05-15
This Week in Student Loans: May 15

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

  This week in student loans:
person calculating the savings when refinancing

Consumers are refinancing loans as a form of personal stimulus

Despite the economic callout due to the coronavirus pandemic, Americans are using historically low interest rates to refinance their loans as a form of personal stimulus during the pandemic. The article explains how mortgage refinancing volume has skyrocketed and how the low-interest rate environment is also applying to student loan refinancing.  

Source: Yahoo Finance

 

Government building

House Democrats scale back $10,000 student-loan-forgiveness measure

On Thursday, House Democrats introduced an amendment to their $3 trillion coronavirus relief spending package that significantly scaled back a student-debt provision, also known as the HEROES Act, because of its higher-than-expected cost.  

Source: Business Insider

 

Government proposing HEROES Act

HEROES Act promises 5 ways to help your student loans

As mentioned above, House Democrats proposed a new $3 trillion stimulus bill called the HEROES Act to provide financial assistance to Americans due to the coronavirus pandemic. Read about the five changes this act includes in the Forbes article.  

Source: Forbes

 

millennial debating whether to pay student loans during CARES Act suspension of loan payments

Coronavirus pauses federal student loans for 6 months — should you pay anyway?

The CARES Act put a pause on all student loan payments through September 30 – but should you pay anyway? This Fox Business article argues that if you have the financial means to do so, you might consider continuing to repay your school loans or even refinance your student loans in a low interest rate environment.  

Source: Fox Business

    That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.  
 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

2020-05-14
A Nurse’s Guide to Student Loan Refinancing

As the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted, nurses play a critical role in our healthcare system, caring for patients, coordinating treatments, and keeping detailed records.   
By Kat Tretina
Kat Tretina is a writer based in Orlando, Florida. Her work has been featured in publications like The Huffington Post, Entrepreneur, and more. She is focused on helping people pay down their debt and boost their income.
  The demand for skilled nurses is only going to grow. According to the
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for registered nurses is projected to increase by 12% by 2028, much faster than average. And, nurses can command high salaries. As of 2019, the median salary for registered nurses was $73,300 per year, significantly higher than the median wage for all occupations, which is just $39,810.    While you likely had to take out student loans to pay for your nursing education, your higher-than-average income makes you a strong candidate for student loan refinancing. Consolidating your debt can allow you to save money and pay off your loans sooner so that you can focus on your other financial goals.   

Why you should refinance student loans after nursing school

Becoming a registered nurse typically requires only a bachelor’s degree. But if you want to become an Advanced Practice Nurse, nurse administrator, or nurse educator, you’ll need a master’s degree   Graduate student loans tend to have higher interest rates than other types of education loans, causing more interest to accrue and your loan balances to grow over time. For example, the interest rate on federal Grad PLUS Loans disbursed between July 1, 2019, and July 1, 2020, is 7.08%.    If you have high-interest debt, refinancing can help you tackle your loans and lower your interest rate. With a solid income as a nurse and a good credit history — or a cosigner willing to apply for a loan with you — you can qualify for a lower rate and save money over the life of your repayment term. In fact, our customers reported that they saved an average of $272 every month and should see an average of $13,940 in total savings after refinancing their student loans with ELFI.   

How to refinance nursing school loans

You can refinance your nursing school loans in just five steps:   

1. See if you meet the lender’s eligibility requirements

Refinancing lenders all have their own borrower criteria, so it’s a good idea to review their requirements ahead of time to ensure you’re eligible for a loan. At Education Loan Finance, you must meet the following conditions: 
  • You must have at least $15,000 in student loans
  • You must earn at least $35,000 per year
  • Your credit score must be 680 or higher
  • Your credit history must be at least 36 months old
  • You must a bachelor’s degree or higher from an approved college or university
  • You must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident
  • You must be the age of majority — 18 years old, in most states — or older 
  • You must have a debt-to-income ratio low enough that you can afford your monthly loan payments
 

2. Consider asking a cosigner for help

When you apply for a refinancing loan, the lender will perform a credit check. If you don’t have an extensive credit history, or if your credit score is too low, you may not be able to qualify for a loan on your own, or you may not qualify for a competitive interest rate.    However, there is a workaround — you can add a cosigner to your loan application. A cosigner is a parent, relative, or friend with good credit who signs the loan application and assumes responsibility for the loan if you fall behind on the payments. Having a cosigner increases your odds of the lender approving you for a loan and qualifying for a lower rate.   

3. Get a rate quote

To find out what kind of loan terms you can get, use ELFI’s Find My Rate tool. By entering basic information about yourself, you’ll get an estimated rate in just a few minutes without affecting your credit score.*    You can see how different factors, like loan term and choosing a variable or fixed interest rate, can affect your monthly payment and total repayment amount.   

4. Gather documentation

Once you find a loan that works for your budget, you can move forward with the loan documentation. To speed up the process, make sure you have the following documents on hand: 
  • Recent pay stub or proof of employment
  • W-2 forms
  • Tax returns (if self-employed)
  • Government-issued ID, such as a driver’s license
  • Loan account information, such as loan servicer name and account number
  • Current loan billing statement or payoff letter
 

5. Submit your loan application

To complete the application, you’ll have to enter personal information about yourself, including your address, birthdate, and Social Security number. You’ll also have to include information about your employer and income.    Once you submit the application, ELFI’s team will review the form and contact you with either an approval or denial. Until the loan is approved and disbursed, continue making payments to avoid late fees and penalties.   

6 other options for managing your loans

While student loan refinancing can be a smart way to pay down your loan balance and save money, it may not be right for you. If you decide against refinancing your education debt, there are alternative strategies for managing your loans.   

1. Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program

Under the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will pay up to 85% of your unpaid nursing education debt. In exchange, you must commit to working for at least two years in a critical shortage facility or serve as nurse faculty in an eligible school of nursing. For more information, visit the HRSA website  

2. Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

If you work for the government or a non-profit organization, such as some hospitals, you may be eligible for loan forgiveness through PSLF. Under PSLF, the government will forgive your federal loans after you work for an eligible employer for ten years while making 120 qualifying monthly payments.    To find out if your employment and loans are eligible for loan forgiveness, use the PSLF Help Tool  

3. State student loan repayment assistance programs

To recruit nurses to work in areas with shortages of healthcare workers, some states offer student loan repayment assistance programs in return for work commitments.    For example, registered nurses in Kentucky can receive up to $20,000 in tax-free loan repayment assistance if they agree to work for two years at a location in a rural and underserved area.    In Florida, nurses can receive up to $4,000 for every year they work at a designated employment site or facility. Eligible nurses can participate in the program for up to four years, and get up to $16,000 in loan repayment assistance.    To find out if your state offers a similar program, visit your state’s department of health or education websites.   

4. Income-driven repayment plans

If you took out federal student loans to pay for your undergraduate or graduate degrees and can’t afford your current monthly payments, you might be eligible for an income-driven repayment (IDR) plan. With an IDR plan, your loan servicer will extend your repayment term and base your payment on your family size and discretionary income.    Federal loan borrowers can apply for an IDR plan online.   

5. Use your sign-on bonus to make extra payments

Depending on your location, you may be eligible for a sign-on bonus. In some areas, nurses are in high demand, and understaffed hospitals and healthcare companies offer sign-on bonuses to attract talented nurses to work for them. You could qualify for a bonus of $10,000 or more on top of your regular salary.    According to AdventHealth, a major hospital network, sign-on bonuses for nurses aren’t usually issued as upfront payments. Instead, they’re broken up into installments over a service period, such as four payments over two years. But if you use those payments to make extra payments on your student loans, you can save money on interest and pay off your debt early.    You can find nursing jobs that offer sign-on bonuses on Indeed  

6. The Student Loan Forgiveness for Frontline Health Workers Act

On May 5, 2020, Rep. Carolyn Maloney, a Democrat in New York,introduced the Student Loan Forgiveness for Frontline Health Workers Act. If passed, this bill would discharge all federal and private loans belonging to healthcare workers who interacted with COVID-19 patients, including doctors, nurses, and technicians.    The bill’s future is unclear, but it does signal that there is growing pressure on lawmakers to help healthcare workers — especially those on the frontlines of the pandemic — pay down their student loan debt.   

Repaying your student loans

As a nurse, your career is taxing enough; don’t let your student loans weigh you down. Student loan refinancing can give you significant relief from your debt. You can save money, pay off your debt, and even lower your monthly payment.    To find out how much you can save, use the student loan refinance calculator.*  
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.     Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
photo resembling economic downturn
2020-04-29
Should I Refinance Student Loans in an Economic Downturn?

The COVID-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on the economy, causing many people to lose their jobs and struggle to make ends meet.    By Kat Tretina   While the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act gave some relief to federal student loan borrowers — including suspending loan payments and waiving interest charges for six months — those provisions won’t last forever. Under the current legislation, the CARES Act protections will expire on September 30, 2020   If you’re looking for a long-term solution for managing your debt, student loan refinancing is a popular strategy. But does it make sense during an economic downturn? Here’s what to consider.   

Should I refinance student loans? 5 questions to ask first

Before moving forward with your refinancing application, ask yourself these five questions.   

1. What kind of loans do you have? 

What kind of loans you have will impact what protections and benefits are available to you.    If you have federal student loans, you may be eligible for protections under the CARES Act, meaning your payments are suspended until September 30, and interest charges are waived.    Since you don’t have to make payments and interest isn’t accruing, it may not make sense to refinance right now. Instead, it may be wiser to wait until the CARES Act provisions expire to refinance your debt.    However, not all student loans are eligible for the CARES Act benefits. Private student loans and some federal loans, such as Perkins Loans and commercially-owned FFEL Loans, don’t qualify for payment suspensions or interest waivers. If you have that kind of debt, refinancing right away can help you save money and pay down your loans.   

2. How secure is your job? 

During an economic downturn, the job market can become volatile. If you’re at risk of losing your job, it’s important to keep your federal loans where they are so you can take advantage of the CARES Act and federal forbearance and deferment protections.    If you have private loans, refinancing can actually be a good idea. When you refinance, you can move your loans to a new lender that offers more generous repayment options, such as longer repayment terms and financial hardship forbearance. For example, if you are unable to repay your loans because of a financial hardship or medical issue, ELFI may grant you forbearance for up to 12 months.    If your company is relatively secure, you can also encourage your employer to offer student loan repayment assistance to recruit and retain top talent. With ELFI for Business, companies can offer this benefit as part of their compensation packages and take advantage of the tax provisions in the CARES Act that benefit employers.   

3. Do you have an emergency fund? 

Refinancing your student loan debt can accelerate your debt repayment. If you make extra payments toward your loans, more of your payment will go toward the principal rather than interest, cutting months or even years off of your loan term.    However, putting extra cash toward your debt during a recession may not be the best course of action. If you don’t have a substantial emergency fund, you’re likely better off stashing your money into a savings account until you have at least three to six months’ worth of expenses saved.    Once you have a fully-funded emergency fund, then you can focus on paying down your debt.   

4. Do you have good credit or a cosigner? 

Refinancing rates are rapidly dropping, so you can dramatically reduce your interest rate when you refinance your student loans.    However, to qualify for the lowest rates, you’ll need to have excellent credit. If your credit is less-than-stellar, or if you don’t have an established credit history, you can still qualify for a loan and get a competitive interest rate by adding a cosigner to your loan application.    A cosigner can be a parent, relative, or even a good friend with a good credit score and stable income. They apply for the loan with you and agree to make payments if you fall behind. Because they’re backing you on the loan, there’s less risk to the lender, allowing you to get a lower interest rate than you’d get on your own.   

5. What are your goals for refinancing? 

When the economy is in decline, it’s essential that you’re very clear about your financial goals. Before refinancing your debt, think about what you want to accomplish. There are three main benefits of student loan refinancing:   
  • You can pay off your debt earlier: With a lower interest rate, more of your payments go toward the principal. If you stay consistent with your payments, you can pay off your student loans ahead of schedule, becoming debt-free sooner. During a recession, not having any debt is a major advantage. 
  • You can save money over the life of your loan: When you refinance your debt and qualify for a lower interest rate, you can save thousands over the length of your repayment term. You can use the money you save to pursue other financial goals, like investing or buying a home. Use the student loan refinance calculator to find out how much you can save.* 
  • You can reduce your minimum monthly payments: If your monthly payments are too high right now, refinancing can make them more manageable. By getting a lower interest rate or extending your repayment term, you can significantly reduce your minimum monthly payment and get more breathing room in your monthly budget. 
   

Refinancing your student loans

Even though the country is going through a significant economic crisis, student loan refinancing can still be an effective way to manage your debt in certain situations. Before refinancing, carefully evaluate your situation and what protections are available for your loans to ensure it’s the right decision for you.    If you decide that refinancing makes sense, use the Find My Rate tool to get a rate quote.*  
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.    Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.