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Common Resume Mistakes for Medical Professionals

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If you search for “medical resume template” online, you’ll find thousands of options, all very different. Which choice, though, will give you the best chance of earning your dream job? Keep these common resume mistakes for medical professionals in mind when you’re putting together your application, and you’ll already be a step ahead of many other candidates.

 

Write Your Resume for the Job You Want

Too many medical professionals make the resume mistake of assuming all jobs are looking for the same thing. This is, in fact, a huge logical fallacy, because although two jobs may be in the same industry, it doesn’t mean they’re looking for the same candidate. One danger of using an online medical resume template is winding up with a resume that’s a little too generic. Pay attention to make sure the format you’re using really highlights your medical skills.

 

For example, if you’re interested in becoming a physician at a hospital, you’ll want to show you’re comfortable with a variety of medical tasks, especially within a hospital setting. You’ll need to prove leadership experience, discipline, problem-solving skills and strong time-management capabilities. In a hospital environment, it’s important to be familiar with your tasks, but also to be prepared to pivot when the situation calls for it.

 

On the other hand, if you’re applying to become a podiatrist at a group medical practice, your day will likely be more specialized and structured. You’ll need to show experience in the field of podiatry, as well as the ability to provide exceptional patient care. Any hiring manager or supervisor will want to know you’re detail-oriented and that you can clearly explain to patients how to maintain at-home care and general wellness practices.

 

Some jobs even use an applicant tracking system to screen applications for specific keywords. Do some research before submitting your resume to a potential employer to make sure your resume is optimized. If the hiring manager is looking for keywords like “patient care” or “medical records,” you won’t want to miss these important bullet points.

 

Talk About Your Experience, Not Your Goals

Another common resume mistake for medical professionals is focusing on goals and objectives versus real-world experiences. You’ll want to be sure you’re formatting your medical resume to showcase your hard-earned experience.

 

In some professions, employers may be looking for someone trainable that can learn most of their job skills on-the-go. In the medical field, however, employers need the opposite. Because you’ll be providing healthcare to patients, knowing your field is far more important than having the ability to learn new skills from scratch.

 

Most jobs do require learning as you go, however, medical professionals are expected to bring some level of experience with them, even to entry-level positions. After all, you’ve put years of time and effort into earning a high-level degree, so you’ve likely graduated with a significant amount of knowledge. Unlike other professionals who learn many of their job skills after graduation, medical professionals graduate with the knowledge necessary to hit the ground running. Employers need candidates whose experience prepares them to do just that.

 

Share Quantifiable Evidence of Success

If you received an award, increased productivity by 10% or worked with 250 trauma cases during your residency, list those numbers on your resume. One common resume mistake for medical professionals is listing vague experiences without backing them up with quantifiable information. Be sure the way you present your experience highlights your medical skills and shows the impact of your work. Here’s an example of how to share your experience, as well as an example of how not to share:

 

How Not to Describe Your Medical Experience

“Spoke with several patients about their ongoing medical needs” doesn’t work, because it isn’t specific or quantifiable. Did you speak with five patients or 50? What did you discuss about their ongoing medical needs? While this likely describes months of hard work, without details, the hiring manager may miss what you’re trying to say.

 

How to Describe Your Medical Experience

“Conducted medical interviews with 34 new patients, with a 96% patient retention rate” is much more specific. It explains that you spoke with an impressive number of new patients, collecting details about their medical histories and ongoing needs. As a general practitioner, retaining this many patients is a huge win, as most patients stay with the same doctor for a long time.

 

Grammatical Mistakes: Missing the Forest for the Trees

Sometimes, when you’re so focused on getting the tiny details of your medical resume right, it’s easy to miss larger mistakes like spelling errors. Even if the information in your resume is fantastic, a misspelled word negates all your hard work.

 

Several employers will immediately toss resumes with grammatical errors, so be sure to proofread. For good measure, ask a friend or family member to look it over, as well.

 

The Bottom Line

Applying for jobs is hard work. If you can avoid these common resume mistakes many medical professionals make, however, you’ll stand out as a stronger candidate. Putting in extra time and effort on your resume will pay off when you receive follow-up calls for fantastic jobs. It will also differentiate you from other candidates, as well as from those using medical resume templates. After crafting the perfect resume, be sure to check out our tips for graduates entering the job market, as well.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

A Psychiatrist’s Guide to Student Loan Refinancing

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Psychiatrists are highly-educated doctors trained to diagnose mental health disorders and to prescribe medicine. Psychiatrists receive extensive training, attending undergraduate and medical schools before completing a seven-year residency.

 

This training comes at a price. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the median cost of a four-year public medical school is $255,517, and the cost of a private medical school is $337,584.

 

The time and effort pay off for psychiatrists, however, as the average wage was $220,380 in 2018. The field is also growing, with demand for psychiatrists expected to increase by 12% through 2029 — far above the average of around 4% growth for all occupations.

 

The combination of career stability and high earning potential makes psychiatrists ideal candidates for student loan refinancing. Refinancing psychiatric student loan debt can help psychiatrists lower their student loan interest rates and accomplish other key financial goals more easily.

 

Why student loan refinancing may be right for psychiatrists

Becoming a psychiatrist requires multiple degrees over more than a decade of education. You’ll need an undergraduate degree from a four-year institution, as well as a degree from an accredited medical school. You’ll also need to complete at least two rounds of residency. These include the standard four-year medical student residency, as well as a three-year psychiatry residency.

 

After years of training, most psychiatrists acquire substantial student debt. To make matters worse, the interest rates on medical school loans are often higher than other student loans. It also takes time to start earning a high income, as the average salary for a first-year medical resident was just $57,191 in 2019, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

 

If you have high-interest student loan debt, refinancing can reduce the cost of your monthly payments and reduce total borrowing costs over time.

 

How to refinance your psychiatric student loan debt

There are five simple steps in refinancing your psychiatric student loans:

 

1. Determine if you qualify to refinance your psychiatric student loan debt

Lenders want to make sure you’re a reliable borrower so you’ll have to meet qualifying requirements. Each sets their own standards, but at Education Loan Finance, these are the key conditions:

  • You must have at least $15,000 in outstanding student loan debt
  • Your annual income must total at least $35,000
  • Your credit score must be at least 680
  • You must have at least 36 months of credit history
  • You must have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher
  • You must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident
  • You must have reached or passed the age of majority (18 in most states)
  • Your debt-to-income ratio must be low enough that your monthly loan payments are affordable

 

2. Consider whether a cosigner could help you get approved for student loan refinancing

Sometimes, it’s difficult to be approved when refinancing on your own. This is especially true if you haven’t had a lot of time to build a good credit score or are earning an entry-level salary.

 

A well-qualified cosigner could help you be approved for a better interest rate. Cosigners share legal responsibility for repayment and the lender considers their credit and income in determining if your approval and rate estimate. If your cosigner has a proven history of financial responsibility, this significantly ups your chances of securing the loan you need.

 

3. Find out loan rates and terms

Next, you should research different lenders for an idea of the student loan refinancing rates available. Use ELFI’s student loan refinancing calculator* to see how much you can save by refinancing your psychiatric student loans.

 

4. Get your financial documents together

If you’ve decided to move forward with refinancing, compiling a few key documents will make the loan application process easier. You’ll need:

  • Proof of employment, such as a recent pay stub
  • A W-2 form from your employer or tax returns if you’re self-employed
  • A driver’s license or other government-issued ID
  • Information about your current student loan accounts, including the loan servicer’s name, your account number and the balance on your loan

 

5. Apply to refinance your psychiatric student loan debt

Finally, you’ll submit an online application to ELFI by filling out a quick and simple form using the documentation mentioned above. ELFI’s team will then review your information and let you know if you’ve been approved or denied. You should keep making payments in the meantime and you’ll be notified when your loan has been approved and disbursed.

 

Other options for managing your loans

1. The National Health Services Corps

Some trained mental health professionals, including child and adolescent psychiatrists, are eligible for loan assistance through the NHSC. Psychiatrists who meet the requirements may receive grants of up to $50,000 towards loan repayment.

 

2. Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) is available on most federal student loans if you work for the government or for an eligible non-profit. You must make payments on a qualifying income-driven plan and can have loans forgiven after 120 on-time payments.

 

3. State student loan repayment programs

Many states offer student loan assistance to psychiatrists who work with underserved populations or who work in the public interest.

 

For example, New York operates a Psychiatric Loan Repayment Program for psychiatrists who work at OMH facilities. Individual psychiatrists who make a five-year commitment can apply for money to repay student loan balances up to $150,000.

 

4. Income-driven repayment plans

Those with federal student loans can qualify for various payment plans in which monthly payments are capped based on income and family size. Payments could be as low as $0 per month and forgiveness eventually becomes available after you’ve made payments for between 20 and 25 years (depending on the program).

 

Repaying your student loans

As a psychiatrist, you understand the importance of avoiding undue stress — including the financial stress that can come from substantial student debt. To make repaying your loans as easy and stress-free as possible, consider whether student loan refinancing makes sense for you.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

The 10 Best Cities for Medical School Graduates

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By Ben Luthi

Ben Luthi has been a freelance writer since 2013, covering all things money and travel. His work has appeared in many major publications and financial websites, including U.S. News & World Report, The New York Times, Fox Business, Experian, FICO and more. Ben lives in Utah with his two kids, and loves spending his free time traveling, hiking and talking about credit cards.

 

Graduating from medical school is just one milestone in the quest to become a physician. Your next step is likely a residency, and for some, the process may also include a fellowship and board certification.

 

Regardless of where you ultimately end up, though, it’s crucial to take your time when deciding where to start that process. To help you narrow down your list of options, we looked at HospitalCareers.com to get an idea of the best cities for medical school graduates.

 

Determining Best Cities for Medical School Graduates

It’s difficult to create a definitive list of the best cities for medical school graduates because the right city for you may depend on your field of expertise, your personal preferences and several other factors.

 

But in its list, HospitalCareers.com provides a comprehensive view of what’s important to medical graduates. That includes cities with the best hospitals and job markets, places with a relatively low cost of living and more.

 

10. Rochester, Minnesota

For many healthcare professionals, the primary pull of Rochester is that it’s home to the No. 1 hospital in the country: the Mayo Clinic. The city also has a relatively small population of just under 120,000, which could make it more manageable for medical graduates who aren’t used to a big city.

 

The city’s cost of living is 94.1% the national average, making it a solid choice for new graduates who are gaining their financial footing. Plus, according to medical professional networking service Doximity, the nearby Minneapolis metropolitan area has one of the highest average physician salaries in the country at $369,889.

 

9. Jacksonville, Florida

While Rochester, Minnesota, is home to the Mayo Clinic headquarters, the medical center has a campus in Jacksonville, Florida. Jacksonville is a much larger city, with a population of more than 900,000. But you won’t have to worry about dealing with the cost of a larger city — Jacksonville’s cost of living is even lower than Rochester’s at 93.5% the national average.

 

Despite being a low-cost area, medical graduates don’t have to go anywhere to enjoy one of the top 10 physician salaries in the country. According to Doximity, it’s $338,790. What’s more, the city has the fifth-smallest gender wage gap between male and female physicians.

 

8. Durham, North Carolina

Durham, North Carolina, has one of the lowest average physician salaries in the nation at $266,180. But for graduating medical students, working at one of the best university hospitals in the nation, Duke, can be incredibly appealing. The medical center is ranked nationally for 11 adult specialties and nine children specialties.

 

Also, like Rochester and Jacksonville, Durham has a relatively low cost of living at 95.2% the national average, which means your salary will go further than most areas in the U.S. The city of Durham is home to roughly 280,000 people.

 

7. Boston, Massachusetts

Boston isn’t just known for being the capital of higher education in the U.S. It’s also home to some of the most well-known medical centers in the country, including Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

 

The former is ranked No. 12 overall in the nation, while the latter ranks in the top three hospitals in the nation for psychiatry, diabetes and endocrinology, and rehabilitation.

 

The only reason to think twice about Boston is its cost of living, which is 162.4% the national average. Also, its average physician salary is relatively low, at $305,634. The city’s population is just under 693,000.

 

6. Nashville, Tennessee

Nashville is one of the most culture-rich cities on our list, especially if you love music. It’s also home to another excellent university hospital, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, which ranks nationally in seven adult specialties and 10 child specialties.

 

The city’s cost of living is 101.4% the national average, which isn’t a deal-breaker but is something to consider. That said, the average annual physician salary is on the high end at $337,914. The Nashville-Davidson area is home to more than 670,000 people.

 

5. Austin, Texas

Austin is the fastest-growing big city in America, which means a lot of opportunity. Its population is just short of 1 million people, which also makes it one of the largest cities on our list. And according to U.S. News & World Report, it ranks as the No. 1 place to live in America.

 

Some of the largest hospitals in the city include St. David’s Medical Center, which was the first health system in the state to be recognized as Employer of the Year by the Texas Workforce Commission, and Cornerstone Hospital of Austin.

 

The city’s cost of living is 119.3% the national average, which could be a non-starter for some. Also, the average salary for physicians in Austin is relatively low, at $299,297.

 

4. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Oklahoma City isn’t known for its world-renowned hospitals. Its healthcare industry, however, is among the fastest-growing in the city, with an expected 30% jump over the next 10 years. This means a lot of opportunity for recent medical graduates.

 

What’s more, the state’s capital has one of the lowest cost of living on our list at 85.4% of the national average. According to Salary.com, the average physician salary in the area is $254,195, which is low compared to the other cities on our list but compared with many cities with high costs of living, your money could go further here.

 

Oklahoma City is home to 655,000 residents.

 

3. Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City’s average physician salary of $351,300 ranks No. 11 in the country, making it an ideal destination for many medical graduates. It’s also an excellent choice if you enjoy outdoor adventures.

 

The state of Utah has one of the nation’s lowest unemployment rates, which means you won’t have too much trouble finding a job. Even during the coronavirus pandemic, the state’s unemployment rate sits at 4.5% for July 2020, compared with 10.2% overall in the U.S. However, the city’s cost of living is 118.9% the national average, which could be a deal-breaker.

 

Despite being the state’s capital, Salt Lake City has only 200,000 residents.

 

2. San Antonio, Texas

San Antonio is the largest city on our list, with more than 1.5 million residents. Despite its size, the city has a cost of living that’s just 89.4% of the national average. That said, the average annual salary for physicians is also relatively low, at $276,224.

 

In terms of stability, roughly 18% of San Antonio residents work in healthcare or bioscience, making the city a safe bet for recent medical school graduates. Some of the best medical centers in the city include Methodist Hospital-San Antonio, Baptist Medical Center and University Hospital-San Antonio.

 

1. Cleveland, Ohio

Cleveland sits atop our list for a few reasons. First, it’s home to the Cleveland Clinic, which has been ranked the second-best hospital in the country behind the Mayo Clinic. Second, the city boasts five large hospitals, which employ more than 100,000 people combined. That’s more than 25% of the city’s population, which sits at about 381,000.

 

Finally, Cleveland has the lowest cost of living on our list of the best cities for medical school graduates — it’s an impressive 72.6% of the national average. One thing to keep in mind is that the average physician salary in the city is $312,448. But considering the low cost of living, that salary will go further than most of the top salaries in other cities.

 

How to choose where to live when you graduate from medical school

Making the decision on where to live after you leave medical school can be challenging. Depending on the residency process and other requirements for your field, your options may be limited based on your specialty. If you have multiple options, though, it’s important to take your time and research all of the factors that are important to you.

 

For example, consider the quality of the healthcare system, as well as the opportunities that might be available to you. Also, look at average salaries in the area and how they compare with the cost of living. Finally, remember that you not only have to work in one of these cities, but also live. Think about your personal preferences and the quality of life you’ll be able to enjoy in each place to make a decision.

 

Additional Sources

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no­­­ control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Best Tips for Paying Off Medical School Debt

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Working as a healthcare professional can be lucrative, but the cost of your education can be overwhelming. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the average cost of medical school at a public university is $243,902, while the average price at a private school is $322,767. 

 

By Kat Tretina

 

With such expensive totals, most students have to borrow a significant amount of money to pay for school; the median amount of student loan debt for medical school graduates was $200,000 as of 2018. 

 

You could spend 20 to 30 years repaying your debt, and with high-interest rates, pay hundreds of thousands in interest charges. Paying off medical school debt can be challenging, but there are ways to manage your loans more effectively. 

 

7 best ways to pay off medical school student debt

Follow these tips to save money, reduce your monthly payments, or pay off your medical school loans early. 

 

1. Make payments during your residency

Many medical school students opt to defer their payments during residency so they can focus on this grueling stage of their education without worrying about their loan payments. However, deferring your payments can cause more interest to accrue on your loans, adding to your overall cost. 

 

If possible, make partial payments during your residency. The American Medical Association reported that the average first-year resident makes around $60,000, so you’ll have some income coming in that you can use. If you can’t afford to make full principal and interest payments, even making interest-only payments or flat $25 monthly payments can reduce charges and help you save money over the long run. 

 

2. Pursue Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

As a medical school graduate, you may qualify for loan forgiveness through PSLF if you work for a non-profit hospital, medical facility, or government agency. If you have federal student loans and work for a qualifying employer full-time for ten years while making 120 monthly payments, your remaining loan balance will be forgiven tax-free. The following loan types are eligible for PSLF: 

  • Direct Subsidized Loans
  • Unsubsidized Loans
  • PLUS Loans
  • Direct Consolidation Loans 

 

3. Apply for an income-driven repayment plan

If you have federal loans and cannot afford your monthly payment under a 10-year Standard Repayment Plan, apply for an income-driven repayment (IDR) plan. Under an IDR plan, your payment is based on your income and family size.

 

During your residency and while establishing your career — while your income is relatively low — an IDR plan will reduce your monthly payments. 

 

Plus, if you still have a balance after 20 to 25 years of making payments, the remaining loan balance is forgiven. However, the discharged amount is taxable as income. 

 

4. Use your physician signing bonus to make a lump sum payment

To recruit healthcare professionals, some hospitals and healthcare facilities offer signing bonuses. According to the American Medical Association, the average physician signing bonus is $32,692. If you’re eligible for a signing bonus, use it to make a lump sum payment against your student loan debt. It can make a significant impact on your balance and repayment term. 

 

For example, let’s say you left medical school with $200,000 in student loan debt at 6% interest with a 10-year repayment term. If you received a signing bonus of $32,692 and applied the entire amount toward your student loans, you’d pay off your loans 25 months ahead of schedule. Plus, you’d save $23,274 in interest charges. 

 

5. Research loan repayment assistance programs

If you’re willing to work in an underserved or rural area as a healthcare practitioner, you may qualify for loan repayment assistance and get some or all of your student loans repaid. There are national and state programs. For example, the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment Program provides primary care clinicians who serve for at least two years at approved sites with up to $50,000 in loan repayment assistance. 

 

For a list of potential loan repayment programs, check out the Association of American Medical Colleges’ database

 

6. Refinance your student loans

If you’re wondering how to pay off medical school debt faster, student loan refinancing* is one of the most effective techniques. When you refinance, you work with a private lender like Education Loan Finance to take out a new loan for the amount of your existing debt. If you have private loans or a mix of private and federal loans, you can consolidate them together and qualify for a new interest rate and loan term. 

 

If you have good credit, you may qualify for a lower interest rate, allowing you to save a substantial amount of money. How much could you save? Consider this example. 

 

If you had $200,000 in loans at 6% interest and a 10-year repayment term, you’d pay $66,449 in interest charges by the end of your repayment term. 

 

However, let’s say you refinanced your debt and qualified for a 10-year loan at 4.25% interest. Your monthly payment would drop, but you’d still repay just $45,850 in interest charges. By refinancing your loans, you’d save $20,599 in interest. 

 

Original Loan

Balance: $200,000

Loan Term: 10 Years

Interest Rate: 6%

Minimum Monthly Payment: $2,220

Total Interest Paid: $66,449

Total Repaid: $266,449

 

Refinanced Loan

Balance: $200,000

Loan Term: 10 Years

Interest Rate: 4.25%

Minimum Monthly Payment: $2,049

Total Interest Paid: $45,850

Total Repaid: $245,850

 

Use the student loan refinance calculator to find out refinancing could help you cut down on interest charges.* 

 

7. Make extra payments

Instead of making only the minimum payments, pay extra each month to reduce the interest that accrues. Over time, paying extra will help you save money and pay off your debt ahead of schedule. Increasing your payment by just $100 per month can make a difference, even if you have six-figures of student loan debt. 

 

With $200,000 of student loans at 6% interest and a 10-year term, your minimum monthly payment would be $2,220. If you increase your monthly payments by $100 — paying $2,320 toward your debt each month — you’d pay off your loans six months early. And, you’d save $4,147 in interest charges.

 

The bottom line

Medical school can be expensive, and if you’re like most students, you had to borrow money to pay for your education. 

 

Paying off medical school debt may seem intimidating, but you likely earn a good income with your degree. You have multiple options for managing your debt, and you are likely a strong candidate for student loan refinancing. 

 

If you decide that refinancing is right for you, you can check your rate online with ELFI.*

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

A Pharmacist’s Guide to Student Loan Refinancing

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Becoming a pharmacist can be a lucrative career decision. However, it requires a significant amount of education. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the typical entry-level education requirement for pharmacists is a doctoral or professional degree. To get the necessary degrees, you likely borrowed a significant amount of money. In fact,  the Pharmacy Times reported that the average student loan debt for pharmacists is over $163,000. 

 

By Kat Tretina

 

Despite the hefty student loan burden, your career path comes with high earning potential. As of 2018, the median salary was $126,120 per year. With such a large income, student loan refinancing is a smart strategy, especially if you work in the private sector. 

 

Why you should refinance pharmacy school loans

If you work in the private sector as a pharmacist — meaning you work for a pharmacy like Walgreens or CVS rather than a non-profit hospital or health organization — you’re ineligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness, even if you have federal student loans. If you have high-interest student loan debt, that means you’re a prime candidate for student loan refinancing. 

 

Student loans for graduate and doctoral degrees tend to have the highest interest rates of any education loan. Even Grad PLUS Loans, a form of federal loan, have sky-high interest rates. For loans disbursed after July 1, 2019, and before July 1, 2020, the interest rate is a whopping 7.08%. With such a high rate, your loan balance can quickly balloon out of control. 

 

With student loan refinancing, you take out a loan from a lender like ELFI* for the amount of your combined existing debt. The new loan has completely different repayment terms, such as length of repayment and interest rate. Your old loans are consolidated together, so now you’ll have just one loan and one easy monthly payment. 

 

Benefits of refinancing pharmacy school loans

There are two main benefits to student loan refinancing

 

1. You can save money

With a pharmacist’s salary and good credit, you could qualify for a lower interest rate when you refinance your debt, allowing you to save a significant amount of money. 

 

For example, let’s say you had $163,000 in student loan debt at 7.08% interest and a 10-year repayment term. Over the course of your repayment, you’d pay back a total of $227,915; interest charges would add $64,915 to your loan cost. 

 

But let’s say you refinanced your debt and qualified for a 10-year loan at just 5% interest. You’d pay back a total of just $207,464. Refinancing your loans would allow you to save $20,451. 

 

Use the student loan refinance calculator to find out how much money you can save.* 

 

2. You can reduce your monthly payment

If you have a large amount of student loan debt, your monthly payments may be more than you can afford. If that’s the case, student loan refinancing can help make your payments more affordable. 

 

When you refinance your debt, you can opt for a longer repayment term. With a longer term, you may pay more in interest, but the tradeoff may be worth it to give yourself more breathing room with your cash flow. 

 

Let’s say you had $163,000 in student loan debt with a 10-year repayment term. At 7.08% interest, your minimum monthly payment would be a whopping $1,899 per month. If you didn’t qualify for a lower interest rate, but extended your repayment term to 15 years, you’d reduce your monthly payment to just $1,472 per month, freeing up $427 from your budget.

 

How to refinance pharmacy school loans

To refinance your loans, follow these four simple steps: 

 

1. Find out if you meet the eligibility requirements

Each refinancing lender has its own eligibility criteria. At Education Loan Finance, borrowers need to meet the following requirements: 

  • Must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident
  • Must have at least $15,000 in student loans
  • Must have a bachelor’s degree or higher
  • Must have a minimum income of $35,000
  • Must have a credit score of at least 680
  • Must have a minimum credit history of 36 months
  • Must have received a degree from an approved post-secondary institution

 

2. Ask a friend or relative to cosign the loan

If you don’t meet the minimum credit or income requirements, consider asking a friend or relative with good credit and reliable income to cosign the loan application with you. A cosigner shares responsibility for the loan with you, lessening the lender’s risk. Having a cosigner on the application increases your chances of getting approved and qualifying for a lower interest rate than if you applied on your own. 

 

3. Request a loan estimate

Before submitting a loan application, get an estimate so you know what interest rate and loan term to expect. With ELFI, you can get a rate quote without affecting your credit score so you can select the right loan that works for you.* 

 

4. Submit your loan application

Once you find a loan that matches your needs, you can complete the loan application. You’ll be asked to enter information about yourself, including your name, address, Social Security number, employer, income, and current loans. 

 

4 other options for managing your loans

While student loan refinancing can be a smart idea for pharmacists, it’s not for everyone, especially if you don’t work in the private sector. If you decide against refinancing your loans, you may be able to get some help with your student loan debt in the form of loan forgiveness, reduced payments, or repayment assistance. 

 

1. Income-driven repayment plans

If you have federal student loans and can’t afford your payments, you may eligible for at least one of the four income-driven repayment (IDR) plans. Under these plans, the federal government extends your loan term to 20 to 25 years and caps your monthly payments at a percentage of your discretionary income. Depending on the repayment plan, your income, and your family size, you could significantly reduce your monthly payment. Some borrowers even qualify for $0 payments. 

 

2. Public Service Loan Forgiveness

If you have federal Direct student loans and work for a government agency or non-profit organization, you may qualify for loan forgiveness through Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF). With PSLF, the government will forgive the remaining loan balance after you work for an eligible employer for 10 years and make 120 qualifying payments. 

 

3. Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Program

The National Health Service Corps (NHSC) operates the Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Program. Under this program, eligible pharmacists can receive up to $100,000 in student loan repayment assistance. In exchange, you have to make a service commitment to work in a substance use disorder site with a health professional shortage area as designated by the NHSC. For more information, visit the NHSC website

 

4. National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program

Highly qualified pharmacists willing to commit to biomedical or biobehavioral research careers can receive up to $50,000 in student loan repayment assistance. In return, you must commit to working in a research area in an approved subject. Visit the National Institutes of Health website for more information. 

 

Repaying your student loans

If you’re a pharmacist with education debt, you should know that you’re an excellent candidate for student loan refinancing. Whether you want to save money or lower your monthly payments, refinancing your loans can help you achieve your goals.* 

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Amazon, Apple, Best Buy, and More: Getting the Most Out of Student Discounts

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Student life can be expensive, but the good news is, most businesses are aware of that. Many provide college student discounts and special offers.

 

With the new school year rapidly approaching, now is the time to take advantage of the many deals available to you. With that in mind, we’ve compiled a list of student discounts to help you save some money during college.

 

Music Streaming Services

If you’re into streaming music, you’re in luck. Many music streaming services provide large discounts to students. Apple Music, Spotify, Youtube Music, and Tidal all offer 50% discounts to students for up to eight semesters. Some subscriptions even offer additional benefits, for example, Spotify provides student members with access to both Hulu and Showtime.

 

Apple

Apple is currently offering a variety of back to school deals for students or and teachers. Qualifying product purchases, including many models of MacBooks and iPads, come with a free pair of AirPods.

 

Amazon

Let’s be honest. We all love two-day free shipping. What a wonderful feeling it is to order something and have it delivered to your door in what feels like no time. The good news is, Amazon offers a Prime Student discount. After a six-month free trial, students can access Amazon Prime for $59 a year.

 

In addition to two-day free shipping, a prime student membership includes access to Prime Video and Amazon Prime Music. Canceling a membership is easy, so even if you don’t choose to pay for the membership, it’s worth taking advantage of the six-month free trial.

 

Best Buy and Other Tech Retailers

If you’re on the market for some new tech, don’t miss Best Buy’s student discount program. From TVs to TI-84s, Best Buy offers student discounts on a variety of products. A number of other tech retailers, including Logitech and Lenovo, also offer student discounts.

 

Clothing Retailer Discounts

If you’re a fashion icon, these retailers have your back. JCrew, Banana Republic, TopShop, H&M, and many other clothing retailers offer student discounts of around 10%-15%. Retail discounts will occasionally stack with other promotions, as well. For even better deals, check out your local Goodwill, as they, too, often offer student discounts.

 

Software Discounts

A number of companies provide student discounts on software. For instance, Adobe offers a 60% discount on their Creative Cloud software for students. Github also provides a number of developer tools at discounted student rates. If you’re into producing music, Ableton Live offers a student discount. For note-takers, Evernote offers their premium accounts at a 50% student discount. If you’re not looking to spend any money, check with your college to see if they provide any free software. For example, many colleges provide access to Creative Cloud programs and the Microsoft office suite, accessible through your .edu email.

 

News Sites

Several newspapers offer student discounts for current college students. The New York Times offers a discounted plan for students at $1.00 a week, which includes online access to the newspaper’s complete archives and articles. The Wall Street Journal offers a comparable student discount for digital access to the newspaper, and an additional option at $10 a month to receive a print copy of the newspaper six days a week.

 

Service Discounts

When you think of service discounts, senior discounts often come to mind. Several service-based industries, however, also offer student discounts. Many museums offer free or reduced admission to students. Several movie theater chains such as Regal and Cinemark also offer student discounts.

 

If you’ve caught the travel bug, don’t forget to keep an eye out for travel discounts. Amtrak, for example, offers regional student discounts. Greyhound has a similar program, offering 20% discounts to students. Student airfare is even up for grabs, so make sure to check with your airline before you buy your tickets.

 

Car Insurance Discounts

It’s no secret that car insurance is expensive for young people. Fortunately, many car insurance providers offer student discounts to help balance some of that cost. These discounts vary by provider, but often include discounts for good grades.

 

If you participate in any campus-sponsored activities, keep an eye out for organization-based discounts. For instance, Geico offers discounts to members of some fraternities, sororities, and honors societies.

 

Cell Phone Plan Discounts

AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon Wireless all offer special student pricing. Several of them also offer student phone discounts. However, these discounts vary, so it’s best to check with your cell service provider and university to find out what discounts are available for students.

 

UNiDAYS

UNiDAYS is a great website for finding college student discounts on almost anything. It functions as a platform that shows student discounts as well as verifies the student. It makes it easy to apply student discounts to wherever you shop regularly.

 

By no means is this a conclusive list of all student discounts. If you’re curious whether a place you frequent offers student savings, the best thing you can do is ask. The discounts add up over time, so take advantage of them whenever you can.

 

If you’ve already graduated and you’re looking to save a little money, you may be out of luck on the student discount front. However, there are other ways to save money after graduation. One such option is refinancing student loan debt. Check out your student loan refinance options with ELFI.*

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

Should You Refinance Student Loans After Medical Residency?

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Congratulations! You’ve graduated from medical school and completed your residency. You are most likely earning substantially more than you were as a medical resident. If you are focusing on paying down your student loans now that you are earning more, you might be wondering whether refinancing your student loans following residency is a good idea. In many cases, it can be a smart move. But there are important things to consider when deciding whether to refinance following medical residency.  

 

By Caroline Farhat

 

In 2018 the average student loan debt for a new medical graduate was $196,520. With the average medical resident salary of $61,200 per year in 2019, it may seem impossible to chip away at the debt balance. But after residency when the average salary for a family physician is $239,000, paying off your student loans can become much more manageable. But once you start thinking about your other financial priorities such as purchasing a house, starting a family, or saving for retirement, suddenly the loans seem like they will never be fully paid off. To combat this, refinancing student loans after you complete your residency can be a great way to reduce the loan amount you owe, making it easier to pay them off more quickly.  

 

What to Consider When Deciding Whether to Refinance After Residency

Here are the factors to consider when deciding whether to refinance your student loans after medical residency.

 

Student Loan Forgiveness

If you completed your residency at a non-profit hospital and think you will continue to work for a non-profit or government entity, you may be eligible for student loan forgiveness. If you have federal loans and are considering entering the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, refinancing your federal student loans to private loans would not be a good option for you since private loans are not eligible for forgiveness under that program. With only 46% of medical graduates planning to work towards student loan forgiveness, this may not be a big factor for many, but it is something to be aware of. The PSLF requires 120 on-time payments while you work in a qualifying non-profit organization or government entity. Only certain federal loans and payment plans qualify for the program. Once the criteria are met, the remaining balance of your student loans is forgiven. At this time, taxes would not be owed for the forgiven amount, however, legislation is frequently introduced to change the program terms. 

 

Your Loans During Residency

How did you handle your student loans during your medical residency? Did you put them in deferment or forbearance? Did you already refinance them? If your loans were in deferment or forbearance they most likely accrued interest, meaning you will be facing more debt to contend with. Although the balance may seem intimidating you may be able to stop the high interest from accruing by refinancing and qualifying for a lower rate. If you have already refinanced, you may qualify for a lower interest rate now since you have increased your income.

 

Your Financial Goals

Your financial goals and timeline are factors that will determine if refinancing after residency is a smart decision for you. Will you continue to live like you are in residency and be able to use your additional income to quickly pay off your student loans? Or is it your financial goal to purchase a home once your residency is completed? If you have other financial goals you want to focus on in addition to paying off your student loans, refinancing would be beneficial to save you extra money per month. Retirement savings is important to focus on since new physicians may be in their 30s when they finish residency. Refinancing earlier and having extra money to save for retirement while you are still young allows you to catch-up on your retirement savings and take advantage of compounding interest.    

 

In addition, refinancing can allow you to shorten the length of your loan. This will not only save you in interest costs over the life of the loan, but it also helps you pay off your loans faster.  

 

Your Current Financial Status

When deciding whether now is the time to refinance, take into account your financial status. Do you have a strong credit score and a good credit history? These are just some factors that are analyzed by lenders to determine your interest rate on a new loan. Lenders usually require a minimum credit score in the 600s, at ELFI the minimum required score is 680. But if you are looking to score a lower interest rate you want a credit score in the high 700s. Lenders will also want to see three years of good credit history. If your finances need a little improvement, refinancing right after residency may not be a good time because you may not see much savings. However, a financially prudent cosigner may be able to help you qualify for a lower rate. If you are already rocking a high credit score and strong credit history, refinancing after residency could save you money now. 

 

Your Current Income

If you are now earning a physician’s salary, instead of your medical resident salary it may be a great time to refinance. When you apply to refinance student loans, your debt-to-income ratio is calculated and helps determine your interest rate. The lower your ratio the better. All your debt is taken into account, including mortgage, car payment, student loans and credit cards. Most lenders will require a ratio of 50% or lower to qualify for refinancing. 

 

For example: if your debts are student loans of $2,000 per month, mortgage of $3,000 per month, auto loan of $500 per month, and credit cards of $200 per month, your total monthly debts are $5,700 per month. If your monthly income is $14,000 per month your debt to income ratio is $5,700/$14,000 = 40.7%.  

 

If you want to see how much you could save by refinancing, use our Student Loan Refinance Calculator to get a custom calculation of your potential savings.* You can also see how shortening the loan term could help pay your loans off faster and save you more interest over the life of the loan. 

 

Conclusion

For many physicians, refinancing student loans after residency will be advantageous. But be sure to consider your own circumstances and finances to determine what would be most beneficial for you. Either way, having a plan to tackle student loan debt is always a good start!

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.