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Current LIBOR Rate Update: March 2020

Posted on

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of March 17, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog, LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 0.75%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.75% (0.75% + 3.00%=3.75%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

 

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.05%%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.05% (1.05% + 3.00%=4.05%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 6 month LIBOR rate is 0.91%%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.91% (0.91% + 3.00%=3.91%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 0.86%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.86% (0.86% + 3.00%=3.86%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: March 13

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

Low Rates Create Big Opportunity To Refinance Student Loans

According to Forbes, the Federal Reserve’s recent decision to cut interest rates in response to growing concerns about the economic impact of the coronavirus could be favorable for student loan borrowers, particularly those with significant student loan debt, such as dentists and doctors.

 

Source: Forbes

 


Senate Rejects DeVos Rule Restricting Aid for Defrauded Students

On Wednesday, the United States Senate voted to reject a student loan rule proposed by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos that would have changed how defrauded students sought relief. The bill reverses DeVos’ new rule on how her department processes debt relief claims made by students who had been defrauded by mainly for-profit colleges that were deemed predatory.

 

Source: Yahoo Finance

 


Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Considers Suspending Student Loan Payments Amid Coronavirus

On Friday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said that the Trump administration is considering suspending people’s student loan payments as part of a larger strategy to mitigate the potential economic consequences of the coronavirus.

 

Source: CNBC

 


An Overwhelming Majority of Millennials Surveyed Regret their Student Debt

According to a survey from Business Insider Intelligence, only 15% of millennials with student loan debt don’t regret their student debt. The survey also found that many millennials overestimated the salary of their first post-grad job, thinking they’ll be able to afford monthly payments.

 

Source: Business Insider

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: March 6

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

People Are Applying for Disability to Try to Get Out of Their Student Loans

Recent data from the National Bureau of Economic Research has claimed that the recent change that allows “Totally and Permanently” disabled individuals to have their student loans discharged has led to an approximate 50% increase in the probability of student-loan holders to apply for Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income.

Source: National Review

 


What This Surprise Fed Rate Cut Means for You

The recent emergency Fed rate cut of 50 basis points in response to the coronavirus outbreak is projected to lower student loan interest rates significantly, as well as student loan refinancing interest rates. The 50-point rate cut was the largest rate cut implemented by the Federal Reserve since late 2008.

 

Source: CNBC

 


Letters Urge Betsy DeVos To Erase Student Loans For Borrowers With Disabilities

An array of student loan advocates are urging DOE Education Secretary Betsy Devos to eliminate hurdles for individuals with disabilities to apply to have their student loans discharged. The letters were signed by more than 30 advocacy groups and student loan advocates of seven states and the District of Columbia.

 

Source: NPR

 


Startup Offers An App That Helps Millennials Pay Off Student Debt

With the trend of companies offering employees assistance with student loans on the rise, a new app, Goodly, provides companies with a variety of methods for doing so, from providing flat monthly payments or tying payments to tenure and increasing over time.

 

Source: Forbes

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: February 28

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

Parents Owe $100 Billion Of Student Loans

The latest data on student loan debt has revealed that while 44 million borrowers collectively owe $1.6 trillion in student loan debt in the U.S., 3.6 million borrowers collectively own $96.1 billion in Parent PLUS Loans.

 

Source: Forbes

 


Record Portion of Student Loans are on Income-Based Repayment

During the fourth quarter of 2019, it was found that almost a fourth (24.7%) of $452 billion in federal student loans were being paid using an income-based repayment plan, which was 21.8% higher than the fourth quarter of the previous year.

 

Source: Market Watch

 


Debt Among Oldest Americans Skyrockets 543% in Two Decades

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, total debt for Americans over age 70 increased 543% from 1999 through 2019. More specifically, student loan debt for 65-year-olds increased 886% per person between 2003 and 2015.

 

Source: CNBC

 


First Aid Beauty Launches Fab Aid Campaign to Tackle Student Loans

A popular beauty brand just took an angle on tackling student debt – First Aid Beauty recently announced that several of their new products sold at Sephora will contribute 10% of retail sales toward a $1 million commitment to help students and graduates pay down their student loan debt. Individuals can apply to have their student loans paid off by First Aid Beauty at fabaid.com by submitting a video sharing their student loan story, and winners will be chosen by the brand’s advisory board.

 

Source: Yahoo

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: February 21

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

30,000 borrowers are being charged for student loans that were already discharged

30,000 borrowers of student loans from a private lender thought their loans would be discharged when they declared bankruptcy years ago – however the lender disagreed, and they are continuing to be charged. The borrowers are now suing the U.S. Bankruptcy court for the Eastern District of New York.

 

Source: Yahoo Finance

 


USC announces new tuition-free plan

The University of Southern California (USC) recently announced two major changes to its financial aid plan, one of which makes attendance tuition-free for applicants whose family’s household income falls at or below $80,000. Owning a home will also not be counted in the calculation to determine a student’s financial need.

 

Source: Forbes

 


Younger employees want help paying down student debt

A recent report from consumer research firm Hearts and Wallets revealed that younger workers would rather have employers assist them with repaying student loans than help them save for retirement. Two-thirds of workers of ages 21 to 27 said companies should help them pay down student debt, while just 27% said companies should help them save for retirement.

 

Source: Investment News

 


49% of Americans expect to live paycheck to paycheck this year

A new survey revealed that a whopping 49% of Americans expect to live paycheck to paycheck through each month of this year. It also revealed that 53% don’t have an emergency fund that covers at least three months of expenses. Despite the negative sentiment, 91% did say they wanted to develop better money habits in 2020.

 

Source: Forbes

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Current LIBOR Rate Update: February 2020

Posted on

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of February 10, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog, LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, February 10, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 1.66%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.66% (1.67% + 3.00%=4.66%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 1 month LIBOR rate as of February 10, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

 

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, February 10, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.71%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.71% (1.71% + 3.00%=4.71%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 3 month LIBOR rate as of February 10, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, February 10, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.72%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.72% (1.72% + 3.00%=4.72%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 6 month LIBOR rate as of February 10, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Monday, February 10, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 1.80%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.80% (1.80% + 3.00%=4.80%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 1 year LIBOR rate as of February 10, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: February 7

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

The Dangers Of Using A 529 Plan For Student Loan Debt

The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement (SECURE) Act that was signed into law on December 20 allows families with a 529 college savings plan to use some of the savings to pay off student loan debt. Previously, you would have to pay a 10% penalty on 529 earnings (not contributions) in order to use the savings for non-qualified expenses, such as paying student loans. This Forbes article explains the limitations of using such plans to pay off student debt.

 

Source: Forbes

 


How Each State is Shaping the Personal Finance IQ of its Student

According to CNBC, there’s increasing research showing that students who are required to learn financial literacy or take personal finance courses in high school make better financial decisions in their early adult life. See how certain states are taking measures to ensure their students are more financially literate in this article.

 

Source: CNBC

 


Student Loan Debt Statistics for 2019

Yahoo Finance has released a report on the state of student loan debt for the year of 2019, including information about the average student loan debt per borrower and student loan debt by state, age, race, and gender.

 

Source: Yahoo Finance

 


Ohio Dad Got 55,000 Identical Letters About His Daughter’s Student Loan

An Ohio father of a student loan borrower was shocked when he received 59 bins of mail containing 55,000 identical letters from the servicer of his daughter’s student loans. The delivery was so large that the man had to pick up the delivery at the back door of the post office and had to make two trips. The servicer claimed it was due to a glitch in the outgoing mail process and that they would work to ensure the mistake would not happen again. When asked what he might do with the letters, the father said, “I just may start a fire, a bonfire, and burn it all,” while laughing.

 

Source: CNN

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: January 31

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

American’s Average Spend on Subscription Services Rises 7% from 2017

An analysis from Mint found that Americans spent an average of $640 on digital subscriptions such as video and music streaming, cloud storage, productivity tools, and dating apps in 2019. This is a 7% increase over $598 in 2017.

 

Source: New York Times

 


Average Monthly Student Loan Payments by State

Ever wonder how much the average monthly student loan payment is in your state? Yahoo Finance is providing that information via a study from Truebill. The article reveals that the average monthly student loan payment varies heavily based on region, with the Northeast states making the highest monthly student loan payments.

 

Source: Yahoo Finance

 


DOE Simplifies Process for Public Service Loan Forgiveness

The Department of Education revealed Thursday that they will simplify the process for borrowers to apply for an expansion of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (PSLF). The change comes after much controversy over the revelation that 71% of denials were “essentially due to a paperwork technicality,” the article states.

 

Source: NPR

 


Young Americans Avoiding Marriage Until Student Loans Are Paid Off

A survey of 1,037 college adults in the U.S. found that one third of individuals 18-34 said they might postpone marriage, or have already done so, until their student debt it paid off. The survey also found that student debt can affect their choice in a partner, with just over a third of millenials and Gen Z respondents saying that their potential partner’s student or credit debt could affect their choice of a spouse.

 

Source: USA Today

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: January 24

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

A Zero Based Budget Helped This Woman Pay Off $215k Worth of Student Loan Debt in 4 Years

When Cindy Zuniga accomplished a major milestone when she graduated from law school in 2015, however, she also came out with $215,000 in student loan debt. See how she managed to eliminate her debt in just four years by both refinancing her student loans and using a zero based budget.

 

Source: ABC News

 


signing legislation

Court Cites Student Loans As Reason To Deny Bar Admission To New Lawyer

Student loan debt can sometimes be a barrier to obtaining professional licensure, specifically for teachers, doctors, and nurses. For one recent graduate of law school, her student loan debt played a significant role in her being denied a license to practice law.

 

Source: Forbes

 


Student Loan Debt Is a Key Factor for Gen Z When Making Career Decisions

A recent survey found that Gen Z’s concern over student loan debt is a key factor in their career decisions, causing many to prioritize finances over passion when it comes to their fields of study. The study found that an overwhelming 61% of college students would take a job they’re not passionate about due to the pressure to pay off their student loans.

 

Source: Yahoo News

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Current LIBOR Rate Update: January 2020

Posted on

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of January 15, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 1.67%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.67% (1.67% + 3.00%=4.67%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 1 month LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

 

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.84%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.84% (1.84% + 3.00%=4.84%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 3 month LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.87%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.87% (1.87% + 3.00%=4.87%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 6 month LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate – January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 1.95%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.95% (1.95% + 3.00%=4.95%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

Chart displaying current 1 year LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.