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Current LIBOR Rate Update: October 2020

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This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of October 19, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog, LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate – October 2020

As of October 19, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 0.15%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.15% (0.15% + 3.00%=3.15%). 

 

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate – October 2020

As of October 19, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 0.24%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.24% (0.24% + 3.00%=3.24%). 

 

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate – October 2020

As of October 19, 2020, the 6 month LIBOR rate is 0.25%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.25% (0.25% + 3.00%=3.25%). 

 

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate – October 2020

As of October 19, 2020, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 0.35%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.35% (0.35% + 3.00%=3.35%). 

 

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Current LIBOR Rate Update: September 2020

Posted on

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of September 3, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog, LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate – September 2020

As of September 3, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 0.16%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.16% (0.16% + 3.00%=3.16%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate for September 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate – September 2020

As of September 3, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 0.25%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.25% (0.25% + 3.00%=3.25%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate for September 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate – September 2020

As of September 3, 2020, the 6 month LIBOR rate is 0.29%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.29% (0.29% + 3.00%=3.29%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate for September 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate – September 2020

As of September 3, 2020, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 0.43%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.43% (0.43% + 3.00%=3.43%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate for September 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

What Trump’s Executive Order Means for Your Student Loans

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Due to the coronavirus outbreak and its impact on the economy, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act in March. The CARES Act gave some federal loan borrowers relief, temporarily suspending their loan payments and reducing their interest rates to 0%.

 

By Kat Tretina

 

The CARES Act was originally set to expire on September 30, and payments and regular interest rates were supposed to be reinstated on October 1, 2020. However, President Trump signed an executive order on August 8 that extended the payment suspension until December 31, extending its benefits but raising some new questions for student loan borrowers. 

 

Here’s what Trump’s executive action means for you, and what to do if you don’t qualify for the CARES Act federal student loan protections. 

 

How CARES Act executive order affects your student loans

For federal loan borrowers who may be still experiencing financial hardships because of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Trump’s executive action was welcome news. 

 

Under the executive action, certain CARES Act protections have been extended until December 31, 2020: 

  • Federal loan payments suspended
  • Interest rates reduced to 0%
  • Collection activities postponed

 

The Education Department has clarified that the extension includes the prior CARES Act protections for those pursuing Public Service Loan Forgiveness and loan rehabilitation, with non-payments during this period still counting as qualifying payments for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program and the federal loan rehabilitation program.

 

Thanks to the executive action, you won’t have to make payments on your loans, and you won’t become delinquent or enter into default. You can use the money you would’ve spent on your payments on rent or other necessary expenses. Or, you can continue making payments on your loans to accelerate your repayment. Since interest rates are set at 0%, you can use this period to chip away at your loan principal. 

 

Who is eligible for the CARES Act federal student loan protections? 

Unfortunately, not all student loan borrowers are eligible for the CARES Act federal student loan protections. Only federal Direct Loan borrowers and those with federally held FFEL Loans qualify, so you must have one of the following loan types: 

  • Direct Subsidized
  • Direct Unsubsidized
  • Grad PLUS
  • Parent PLUS
  • Direct Consolidation
  • FFEL Loans currently owned by the U.S. Department of Education

Should I refinance my student loans?

While federally held student loans are covered by the bill, neither Perkins Loans nor privately-held FFEL loans are covered by the bill. Private student loans are also ineligible for the CARES Act protections and the executive action extension. 

 

If your loans don’t qualify, now may be a good time to consider student loan refinancing. Student loan refinancing rates are at an all-time low, so you can reduce your rate, lower your monthly payment, and save money over the length of your repayment term. 

 

When you refinance, you apply for a loan from a lender like ELFI for the amount of your combined existing debt. Your new loan will have different terms, such as interest rate, monthly payment, and the repayment period. To get the lowest student loan refinancing rates, you typically need good to excellent credit, and you need to opt for a shorter loan term. 

 

With good credit — or a cosigner to apply for the loan with you — you may qualify for a lower interest rate than you have now and save a significant amount of money. 

 

For example, if you had $40,000 in student loans at 6% interest and a 10-year repayment term, you’d pay $53,290 over the length of your repayment term. 

 

But if you refinanced and qualified for a 10-year loan at 4% interest, you’d pay just $48,598. By refinancing your student loans, you’d save $4,692, and you’d even reduce your monthly payment. 

 

Original Loan

Balance: $40,000

Interest Rate: 6%

Loan Term: 10 Years

Minimum Monthly Payment: $444

Total Interest: $13,290

Total Repaid: $53,290

 

Refinanced Loan

Balance: $40,000

Interest Rate: 4%

Loan Term: 10 Years

Minimum Monthly Payment: $405

Total Interest: $8,598

Total Repaid: $48,598

 

Use the student loan refinance calculator to find out how much you save by refinancing your student loans. If you decide to move forward with refinancing, you can get a rate quote from ELFI without affecting your credit score.*

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply. 

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no­­­ control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: August 14, 2020

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

white house

Trump Extended Federal Student Loan Relief: Here’s What Experts Say You Should Do If You Qualify

This past Saturday, President Trump signed an executive order to extend the federal student loan suspensions included in the CARES Act, which put all federal student loans into automatic forbearance with 0% interest accrued during the period.

 

Source: CNBC

 


student loan servicers

New Details, Timeline Announced For Big Student Loan Servicing Changes

This week, the U.S. Department of Education released new details and a possible timeline for the upcoming loan servicing changes that would impact millions of student loan borrowers.

 

Source: Forbes

 


photo of low student loan interest rates

Student Loan Interest Rates Are Way Down — Here’s How to Refinance in 3 Quick Steps

Interest rates on private student loans offered by banks and online lenders have dropped significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic – here’s how you can take advantage of these low rates by refinancing.

 

Source: Yahoo Finance

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: July 31, 2020

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

white house

Trump: Student Loans May Be Suspended For “Additional Periods Of Time”

With a second stimulus package on the way, Trump has stated that student loan suspensions may be extended past the already in place deadline.

 

Source: Forbes

 


GOP Coronavirus Relief Proposal

Here’s How the Latest GOP Coronavirus Relief Proposal Would Impact Student Loans

The GOP has released their coronavirus relief proposal, but experts claim that it is largely ineffective in helping student loan borrowers.

 

Source: CNBC

 


student loan servicers

What to Know About Changes Coming to Student Loan Servicing

In an attempt to streamline student loan servicing, the US government has signed contracts with five companies to provide customer service and back-office support to federal student loan borrowers.

 

Source: U.S. News & World Report

 


man researching whether to refinance student loans

Should You Refinance Student Loans? What to Consider as Legislators Debate New Stimulus Package

Refinancing rates are incredibly low, but due to the second stimulus package not yet being put in place, student loan borrowers are unsure of when the best time to refinance will be.

 

Source: Newsweek

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: July 24, 2020

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

Next Stimulus, What It Could Mean For Student Loans

Next Stimulus, What It Could Mean For Student Loans

With a second stimulus package as a near certainty, a number of plans to help student loan borrowers have been introduced as possible components of a second stimulus package.

 

Source: Forbes

 


Employer paying off student loans

Some Employers Are Starting to Pay Off Student Loans – Here’s How it Works

As student loans have become a larger part of the public consciousness, employers have begun to offer programs to help their employees pay off their student loans more quickly and effectively.

 

Source: CNBC

 


low federal student loan interest rates

With Student Loan Refi Rates Dropping, is This a Good Time to Refinance?

Due to the Coronavirus, student loan refinancing rates have dropped substantially, potentially allowing those who qualify to save extensively on their student loan payments.

 

Source: Newsday

 


millennial preparing for private student loan changes within cares act

House Extends CARES Act Protections to Private Student Loans

In an effort to help student loan borrowers deal with the effects of the coronavirus, the House of Representatives have vocally agreed to a provision that would offer CARES act protections to borrowers of private student loans.

 

Source: Newsweek

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: July 17, 2020

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

borrower stressed about student loan payments restarting

Student-loan borrowers could face headaches when loan payments resume

While the CARES Act has provided some form of student loan relief during a time of economic downturn, there are fears of what will happen to many borrowers when the federal government turns student loans “back on” September 30.

Source: MarketWatch

 


low federal student loan interest rates

Student loan interest rates hit record lows, thanks to COVID-19

Due to the economic fallout from COVID-19, interest rates for federal student loans for the upcoming academic year will be fixed at the lowest levels in history.

Source: Yahoo Finance

 


millennial preparing for federal student loan servicing changes

Major student loan servicing changes: 5 tips to protect yourself

The U.S. Department of Education is planning to move forward with a major overhaul of its federal student loan servicing system as soon as December. Due to prior experiences in which the government has gone under contract with loan servicers to take over a portion of their loan portfolio, there is some fear that this will create confusion among the different servicers’ policies and guidelines. This Forbes article explains how to prepare for this change.

 

Source: Forbes

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Current LIBOR Rate Update: July 2020

Posted on

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of July 7, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog, LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate – July 2020

As of July 7, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 0.18%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.18% (0.18% + 3.00%=3.18%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate for July 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate – July 2020

As of July 7, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 0.27%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.27% (0.27% + 3.00%=3.27%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate for July 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate – July 2020

As of July 7, 2020, the 6 month LIBOR rate is 0.36%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.36% (0.36% + 3.00%=3.36%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate for July 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate – July 2020

As of July 7, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 0.49%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.49% (0.49% + 3.00%=3.49%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over time.

 

Chart Showing Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate for July 2020

(Source: macrotrends.net)

 

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: July 10, 2020

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

US Capitol

GOP Concerns Over Costs Could Limit Student Loan Relief In Next Stimulus

GOP Senate leaders are showing increasing concern about the costs of additional economic relief, particularly when it comes to student loan relief, as they weigh a second stimulus bill.

Source: Forbes

 


State Senate Chambers

Democrats Fail to Override Trump Veto on Student Loan Policy

This Friday, House Democrats were unable to override the Trump Administration’s veto on a proposal to reverse the Education Department’s strict policy on loan forgiveness for students misled by for-profit colleges. The House voted 238-173 in support of the override measure, coming up short of the two-thirds majority needed to send it to the Senate.

Source: ABC News

 


question mark

Study Finds Gen Z Borrowers Are Unaware of COVID-19 Student Loan Relief Programs

While the CARES Act allowed those with federal student loans to pause payments until September, a recent survey from Student Debt Crisis shows that Gen Z borrowers, in particular, were the least aware of the relief program.

 

Source: CNBC

 


note saying pay off debt

Author Shares Her Big ‘Wake Up Call’ That Led Her to Pay Off $81,00 in Student Debt

35-year-old Melanie Lockert, the author of “Dear Debt,” shared with CNBS the story of how she was able to pay off $81,000 in student loan debt over 9 years, with her big wake up call coming five years into repayment.

 

Source: CNBC

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

This Week in Student Loans: June 18, 2020

Posted on

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

 

This week in student loans:

photo saying legislation

NAACP And 60 Other Groups Call On Congress To Cancel Student Debt

After the federal government has provided student loan relief to all federal student loan borrowers through the CARES Act, a coalition of over 60 organizations including the NAACP, American Federation of Teachers, and the National Consumer Law Center are now calling Congress to cancel student loan debt altogether in their next stimulus package.

 

Source: Forbes

 


low rates on federal student loans

Student Loans: 3 Ways To Get A Lower Interest Rate

This Forbes article lays out the three ways to get a lower interest rate on your student loans, covering options such as refinancing, borrowing a new student loan, or even switching to a variable rate loan.

 

Source: Forbes

 


question mark

How to Pay Off Student Loans When You’re Broke

With many individuals struggling to pay off their student loans due to lack or income or overwhelming expenses, this Fox Business article lays out options for paying down student debt when faced with difficult financial circumstances.

 

Source: Fox Business

 


student debt in america

How Student Loans Became a $1.6 Trillion Problem

With the cost of college increasing almost 25% in the past decade and total student loan debt reaching $1.6 trillion, this CNBC video offers a historical view of the path the U.S. took to arrive at this state.

 

Source: CNBC

 

 

That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.