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Campus Tours: 6 Stunning Colleges and Universities in the Midwest

There’s something truly extraordinary about America’s Heartland. From amber waves of grain and gently-sloping hills to The Great Lakes and vibrant cities like Chicago and Kansas City, the warm and welcoming atmosphere is felt almost immediately. Along with our friends at eCampus Tours, we’re highlighting six stunning college campuses you can experience from the comfort of your own home – although we wouldn’t blame you for wanting to make a trip in person.

 

University of Iowa

Iowa City, IA

Located on the bank of the Iowa River, The University of Iowa has almost 33,000 students from all over the globe. It’s also been listed #34 on U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Public Universities” list and one of the top 200 universities in the world by U.S. News & World Report. The city itself is one of the largest in the state and has been named as one of the best places to live by Livability.com.

 

This college campus tour begins at the Pentacrest and the Old Capitol building – once the site of the state’s legislature. Stops include the Riverfront Student Union, Kinnick Stadium, home to the Hawkeyes, and Rienow and Slater residence halls. Tour here.

 

University of Iowa

Creighton University

Omaha, NE

One of 27 Jesuit colleges and universities in the US, Creighton enrolls almost 9,000 students and has built a reputation for offering exceptional academics coupled with a low student-to-faculty ratio, highly competitive athletics and value. They’ve also been named one of the top National Universities by U.S. News & World Report’s 2020 list of “Best Colleges.”

 

This college campus tour begins at the Morrison Soccer Stadium and continues to the apartment-style Opus Square housing complex and the relaxing Jesuit Gardens, where students can be seen tossing Frisbees® and enjoying the Midwest sun. Your virtual tour isn’t complete without a stop at Creighton Hall. Tour here.

 

 

University of Michigan – Ann Arbor

Ann Arbor, MI

Well-known for its championship athletics and high academic standards, the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor can claim a lot of accolades, including recently being named the #1 U.S. Public University by QS World University Rankings and #4 Top Public School in the U.S. by U.S. News & World Report.

 

Highlights on the eCampus Tour include a peek inside Michigan Stadium, home to 11 claimed national football titles and Pierpont Commons — the location of the North Campus student union. Tour here.

 

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

North Dakota State University

Fargo, ND

This research university educates over 14,000 students and is one of the largest in the State of North Dakota. NDSU offers a comprehensive selection of courses of study – from Agribusiness and Applied Economics to Pharmaceutical Sciences to Communication.

 

The tour stops by the Wallman Wellness Center, a popular spot for group fitness and aquatics, as well as the Engineering Center, the largest academic program on campus. Reed/Johnson Hall provides students with a glimpse of dorm life while the Memorial Union can provide a taste of dining options and rec activities. Tour here.

 

University of Kansas

Lawrence, KS

Just 55 students enrolled in the university back in 1866, but now, it’s grown to almost 28,000. As the state’s flagship university, KU places a big emphasis on research and service across five campuses. Thirteen academic schools offer over 400 degree and certificate programs, ranging from aerospace engineering to Slavic languages & literatures.

 

The eCampus Tour includes stops at the main union on campus, Kansas Union, and provides an impressive look at the $17 million Student Recreation Fitness Center. Tour here.

 

University of Kansas

Carleton College

Northfield, MN

Located just 40 miles outside of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Carleton College is a small, private liberal arts college that challenges students on ‘how to learn for a lifetime.’ Though the campus spans over 1,000 acres, including an 880-acre arboretum, they take pride in how close-knit their community has become.

 

The virtual tour begins at the Japanese Gardens, which stays true to Japanese gardening principles and continues to Goodhue Bridge, which covers one of two lakes on the expansive campus. Finally, e-visitors can stop by the rec facility and dining center before checking out the Laurence McKinley Gould Library. Tour here.

 

Carleton College

 

 

Whether you’re a rising high school senior still scoping out where to spend your college years, or like us, and appreciate everything a vibrant college campus brings to a community, we think you’ll find the over 1,300 tours on eCampus Tours well worth the visit. Ready to take the plunge? Click here to learn about our great rates and flexible terms for private student loans*.

 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.


Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

Financial Aid Options for Middle-Income Families

It’s no secret that college comes with a hefty price tag. Every year, families have to figure out how they’re going to pay thousands of dollars in school bills. While some may have the resources to pay tuition, many just do not have that kind of money lying around. Thankfully, there are plenty of options when it comes to reducing the cost of college. We’re sharing the steps middle-income families can take to secure various types of financial aid.

 

FAFSA

If you’re looking for financial aid options, you should start by filling out The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, better known as the FAFSA. Even as a middle-income family, you may still receive some need-based aid, especially if your student plans on enrolling at a higher-cost school. Further, many scholarships require the student to fill out the FAFSA anyway. Over $120 billion are awarded through federal grants, work-studies and loans every year, so why not throw your name in the hat? The FAFSA opens October 1 every year, and you can apply as early as the year before your child’s first day of college. The earlier you apply, the more likely your child is to receive financial aid.

 

Scholarships

Perhaps the best thing your child can do is research and apply for scholarships, and it pays to go local. Many locally-owned businesses and organizations offer scholarships for graduating high school students. You or your spouse could also ask your employer if they provide any scholarships or financial aid for employees’ children. After exhausting local options, your child may want to research national opportunities. A quick web search could reveal countless free scholarships – Niche®, Fastweb®, and eCampusTours® are an excellent place to start. Just remember, scholarships are not exempt from internet scams, so do your research and make sure they’re legitimate. The FTC warns families to be cautious if the following lines are included in the application:

  • “The scholarship is guaranteed or your money back.”
  • “You can’t get this information anywhere else.”
  • “I just need your credit card or bank account number to hold this scholarship.”
  • “We’ll do all the work. You just pay a processing fee.”
  • “The scholarship will cost some money.”
  • “You’ve been selected” by a “national foundation” to receive a scholarship – or “You’re a finalist” in a contest you never entered.

Source: FTC

 

Finally, seek out the colleges that offer the best financial aid packages. Student Loan Hero recently highlighted 50 U.S. Colleges With the Most Generous Financial Aid Packages, and yours may be on their list! If it’s not, reach out to your school’s financial aid office, and they’ll be happy to provide you with all of your options.

 

Tuition Discounts

While you’re asking about scholarships, inquire about tuition discounts.

 

Sibling Discounts: Sometimes, if more than one child is enrolled at the same college or university, the school may offer a tuition discount. Often the discount is only applied to one sibling’s tuition, but it is still helpful for the family’s overall finances. These discounts can range from a flat rate to a percentage off each semester or each year. If your children are planning on enrolling at the same school, this option is worth seeking out.

 

Military Discounts: Colleges may also offer discounts to military veterans and their families. The Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014 ensures veterans and dependent family members will not be charged out-of-state tuition if they meet specific requirements. Again, check with the school’s financial aid department to see if they offer “military-friendly” discounts.

 

Alumni Discounts: If you attended your child’s school of choice, your child may be eligible for scholarships, discounts, or other benefits. Many colleges have legacy programs, competitive scholarships, or even special legacy tuition rates. If you have other family connections to the university like grandparents, make sure you talk to an admissions counselor about the financial aid options available.

 

Tax Rewards

Middle-income families are perfectly positioned to receive tax credits for college expenditures. For example, the Lifetime Learning Credit provides a 20 percent tax credit for the first $10,000 in yearly, qualified tuition expenses. Programs like this, as well as tuition savings plans, offer a few different ways for middle-income families to receive tax benefits.

 

Federal Loans

If you’ve taken advantage of all your aid options and find you still have a debt to pay, it may be time to consider loans. Non-need based federal loans such as the Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan for students and the Federal PLUS Loan for parents can bridge whatever gap you find in your aid and your expenses. Federal education loans generally have low-interest rates or may be tax-deductible, so they’re a smart alternative to using a credit card, for example.

 

Private Loans

You may find that you still need financial assistance after exhausting all the options above. If that’s the case, private student loans may be an option. We always recommend you take advantage of grants, scholarships, and federal aid before taking out a private student loan. To learn more about ELFI’s private student loan options1, click here.

 

Other Qualifications

Remember that financial aid in the form of discounts and scholarships aren’t always one and done. Even if you’re getting a scholarship based on your family history or some type of local competitive scholarship, you may be required to meet certain qualifications to receive the money. Sometimes you might be required to complete a number of service hours or stay enrolled in school full-time to keep your scholarship, for example. Make sure you know any additional qualifications or requirements before applying for the scholarship or another type of aid – you don’t want to be caught off-guard.

 

The cost of college can present a challenge for families at all income levels. If you find yourself in that position, don’t despair. The options in this article are a good place to start searching for financial assistance. No matter what, don’t lose sight of the end goal: getting a degree and ultimately establishing a sustainable career. If you’re already looking for financial aid, you’re well on your way.

 

 


1Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

Will Applying for a Student Loan Hurt My Credit Score?

So you’re looking for student loans to finance your education – good for you! Student loans can be an option to bridge the gap when financial aid doesn’t cover the full cost of your tuition and college expenses, which is the case for about 43 million Americans. Nonetheless, it’s smart to think about how student loans can affect your financial future and whether applying for a student loan will hurt your credit score.

 

First off, let’s explain what a credit score is. Simply put, it’s a three-digit number that indicates your relative credit risk. One of the most common credit-scoring model is a FICO® score. Ranging from 300 to 850, the higher the number, the more likely (theoretically) someone is to pay their bills on time. Factors that determine your credit score include:

  • Payment history
  • Your debt-to-income ratio (DTI)
  • How established your credit is
  • Credit mix
  • Recent applications for credit

 

Needless to say, a major indicator of your financial well-being is indicated in your credit score.

 

How Applying for Private Student Loans Affects Your Credit Score

 

Whenever you apply to take out a loan, a credit inquiry from one or several credit reporting agencies will likely occur. If you have a solid credit history, the effects are usually minimal. However, the effects will typically be larger for someone with little-to-no credit. According to an article by Bev O’Shea posted on Nerdwallet, whatever impact your credit score suffers should fall off after 12 months, and after about 24 months, the inquiry should disappear from your credit report entirely.

 

There’s also an important distinction between a “soft” and “hard” credit inquiry.

 

A “soft pull,” as it’s known, can be done just in connection with pre-qualification for a loan, whether it’s a credit card offer you receive in the mail, mortgage, student loan, or car loan. Some employers will do a soft pull of your credit as well. Soft pulls do not impact your credit score.

 

A “hard pull” generally requires your consent and happens when you apply for the credit you’re seeking. It’s the hard pulls that show up on your credit report. It’s important to monitor your credit report and dispute any hard inquiries you didn’t authorize.

 

In the case of private student loans, a prequalification will not typically affect your credit, whereas applying for a loan will show up on your report.

 

Applying for Multiple Private Student Loans

 

So, what if you submit multiple applications? Will they all affect your credit score? It’s hard to know for sure, as credit-scoring model companies don’t provide a lot of detail about their models. Generally speaking, credit-scoring models appear to take into consideration that if an applicant has multiple inquiries for a student loan they may be shopping for the best rate. One key point is that the closer those inquires are together, the less impact it may have on your credit score.

 

In other words, shopping around to find the best loan option for you should not affect your credit score dramatically and is likely not a major cause for concern. By applying for multiple private student loans, you can see which lender will actually give you the best rate – important when it comes to saving money over the life of your loan.

 

ELFI offers a variety of private student loan options for financing your undergraduate or graduate education, as well as private student loan options for parents.* Check out our full list of frequently asked questions or contact ELFI at 1-844-601-3534 to speak with a Personal Loan Advisor.

 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

5 Common Questions About our Private Student Loans

College years can be an exceptional time for not only acquiring skills that translate into a successful career, but also, defining oneself as an individual. Whether it’s pursuing your passion for the arts, discovering your innate talents, or learning the skills that are demanded by our global economy, there’s little doubt there are benefits to attending college. However, the cost of college is rising and that dream of achieving a higher education, for many students, becomes just that. We’re here to help clear some of the confusion around paying for college by sharing the five of the most common questions our Personal Loan Advisors answer about ELFI* Private Student Loans.

 

Which are better, federal loans or private loans?

This is a very common question! Federal and private loans are designed to help cover the cost of college, and students don’t have to choose one or the other. Generally, we recommend students complete their FAFSA, do their research and go after any grants or scholarships they qualify for, plus any other federal loan products before considering private student loans.

 

With that in mind, do ELFI loans have any fees?

This answer is simple. ELFI Private Loans for College have no application, origination or prepayment fees. Keep in mind, this may not be true of all lenders.

 

Do I need a cosigner? What are the benefits?

You don’t need a cosigner for an ELFI private student loan as long as you can qualify on your own. If your credit history is limited (common with students just transitioning into college), and your income is limited (also common), a cosigner who has a good credit history and income can improve your changes of securing a private student loan.

 

How much of my education costs can an ELFI Private Student Loan cover?

The ELFI Private Student Loan program can cover up to 100% of your school-certified cost of attendance. The cost of attendance typically includes tuition, books, supplies, room and board, transportation, and personal expenses. The minimum you can borrow is $10,000.

 

Will my ELFI private student loan have variable or fixed interest rates?

Both are options. Fixed interest rates will not change from year-to-year. However, variable interest rates will change based on the LIBOR index (more on that at the link), and may increase or decrease over the life of the loan.

 

We hope these common questions about ELFI private student loans offer some of the clarity you need as you embark on your college years. It’s important to weigh all of your options when it comes to how you’ll pay for college, and take every step to ensure the college or university you’ve chosen is a fit for your career and financial goals. We encourage you to check out our full list of frequently asked questions or contact ELFI at 1-844-601-3534 to speak with a Personal Loan Advisor.

 

Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

 

*Education Loan Finance is a nationwide student loan provider offered by Tennessee based SouthEast Bank. ELFI is designed to assist students financially with receiving their education. Subject to credit approval. See Terms & Conditions. Variable interest rates may increase after closing but will never exceed 18.00% APR. The term of your loan, financial history, and other factors, including your cosigner’s (if any) financial history can affect the interest rate. For example, a 10-year loan with a fixed rate of 7% would have 120 payments of $11.61 per $1,000 borrowed.

Who Is Considered a Full-Time College Student and Why Does it Matter?

Are you at that important time in your life when you are seriously considering going to college? If so, you probably have a shortlist of colleges that you would like to attend. However, just as important as where you will go to college is the consideration of how you will go to college. Will you be a full-time student or a part-time student? It seems pretty obvious that a full-time student will go to school more often during the academic year than a part-time student. However, what you probably don’t realize is that what distinguishes the two tends to vary by college or university. It’s essential that you know the enrollment requirements of any college that you are thinking of attending.

What Is the Definition of a Full-Time College Student?

 

The most obvious difference between a full and part-time student relates to how many credit hours are taken during a semester. To be regarded as a full-time student generally means working toward a minimum of twelve credits (approximately four classes). Part-time is usually considered to lie somewhere in the area of two to eleven credits (one to three classes).

 

However, what counts as full time at a school that uses a semester system will likely vary from what counts as full-time at a school that uses a quarter system. To make things easier to understand, students are usually classified as full-time as long as they take more than half of a traditional course load.

 

To learn if you will be considered a full-time student, check with the college of your choice. The registrar’s office will most likely have the college’s definition posted online. If not, a quick phone call or email is the best way to go.

Note: if you are a student with some learning differences, then a full-time course load for you might vary from that of other students. Be sure to check with your college on your particular situation.

Does my Enrollment Status Impact my Tax Deductions?

 

Whether or not you are classified as a full-time student can affect different aspects of your education – including any impact it might have on your taxes. For example, you may qualify for certain tax credits and deductions as a full-time student that you would not be eligible for as a part-time student. As we saw above, sometimes this status question is school specific. Luckily, the IRS simplifies things by stating that it will regard you as a full-time student if: you are ‘attending an education program for at least five months per calendar year’. Keep in mind, the five months do not need to be consecutive or full. If you are counting on certain deductions, then you should check with your tax advisor before taking any action (such as dropping a class) that might affect your enrollment status.

 

These tax implications also apply if your parents or guardians claim you as a dependent. To do so, you (the student) must be under the age of 24 and be a full-time student.

 

Will My College Enrollment Status Affect My Student Loans?

 

Most importantly, financial aid packages and student loans are influenced by whether your status is a full-time or part-time student. Often times, academic scholarships require a certain grade point average and the maintenance of a certain enrollment status – think full-time vs part-time enrollment. Check with your financial aid office when considering the shift from full-time to part-time to better understand the cost impact to not only your college provided aid but federal aid as well.

 

If you are a full-time student with private student loans and have selected deferment payment plan while in school, you do not have to begin paying back many student loans until you drop below full-time status (and often times 6 months after that due to a grace period). This is designed to allow students to make it through their college career and find employment prior to paying off their student debt. If you change your status you may trigger the commencement of your student loan payments sooner. Don’t let yourself be blindsided by reducing your course load only to discover that you have to start making student loan payments you had previously thought were delayed until after graduation. If in doubt call your lender to get clarifications on your individual scenario.

 

Does course load impact student athletes?


If you’re a student-athlete, you are already balancing your class load and practice and travel schedules. That could be a strain and it might have you thinking about scaling back your class load. Keep in mind, you may not be eligible to compete if you fall below specified enrollment requirements. This full-time status is very similar to grade requirements, codes of conduct and other requirements set forth by your college and the conference it belongs to. Be sure to speak with your coach prior to making changes to your schedule or class load if this is of a concern.

 

What Are the Benefits of Being a Full-Time Student?

 

One obvious benefit of going to college full-time is that you’ll get through college faster than a part-time student. As mentioned earlier, there are also many scholarships with the eligibility requirement that you must be a full-time student. Don’t underestimate the positive impact these scholarships and grants can have on your total cost of attending college. And, if you want to live on campus, some schools require you to be a full-time student.

 

Can I Be Both a Full-Time and Part-Time Student?

 

It’s completely acceptable to mix the two types of statuses varying between semesters. If the stress of full-time school gets to be too much, you might benefit from taking a part-time semester or even a part-time year. Situations change, and the important thing to remember is that you can adjust your schedule to whatever fits your needs. Just remember to talk to your financial aid office at your college so that you understand how your decision affects your status at the college and your college finances.

 

After you have that well-earned degree in your hand, it will be time to begin tackling your student loan debt. If you are burdened by high monthly payments from your existing student loans, there is a way out – it’s called student loan refinancing. Talk to ELFI to find out how we may be able help you lower your monthly student loan payments or help you pay down your balance faster*.

 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites

Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Top-Earning Majors in the US

Do you know what you want to do for the rest of your life? If you’re like many students, your answer will change as you progress through your college years. Will your career pay well out of the gate, or will it take some time to reach financial success? Some top-earning majors on this list start out with high-earning salaries, while others, such as a business analysis, start out on the lower scale before eventually offering a higher salary as experience grows.  

 

Sometimes your passion is profitable, but if it’s not, knowing what college major to pursue can be hard. This purpose of this blog isn’t to steer you toward a certain top-earning major, but rather to help you make an educated decision based on data. So without further ado, let’s take a look at what careers earn top-dollar in the US.

Highest Starting Salaries

If you’re looking to earn a high salary right out of college, engineering may be the major for you. U.S. News reported that according to PayScale data, these top-earning majors had the highest median starting salaries for workers with a bachelor’s degree:

  1. Electrical engineering. Median starting salary: $71,659

 

  1. Nuclear engineering. Median starting salary: $73,175

 

  1. Chemical engineering. Median starting salary: $73,627

 

  1. Computer engineering. Median starting salary: $74,026

 

  1. Petroleum engineering. Median starting salary: $96,544

PayScale’s Highest Paying Majors of 2019

Data from PayScale’s research confirms US News’s report on engineers’ earnings. Analyzing the overall top-earning majors and not just the highest starting salaries shows engineering jobs are still at the top of the list. The salaries below reflect the median salary for each group described.

  1. Aeronautics & Astronautics

      Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $73,100 

      Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $131,600

 

  1. Pharmacy

     Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $79,600

     Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $132,500

 

  1. Business Analysis

     Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $57,200

     Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $133,200

 

  1. Electrical Power Engineering

    Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $72,400

    Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $134,700

 

  1. Actuarial Mathematics

    Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $63,300

    Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $135,100

 

  1. Political Economy

     Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $57,600

     Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $136,200

 

  1. Operations Research

     Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $77,900

     Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $137,100

 

  1. Applied Economics and Management

     Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $58,900

     Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $140,000

 

  1. Electrical Engineering & Computer Science (EECS)

     Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $88,000

     Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $142,200

 

  1. Petroleum Engineering

    Salary with 0-5 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $94,500

    Salary with 5-10 years work experience + Bachelor’s degree: $176,900

 

You can see a full list of top-earning majors according to Payscale here.

 

Even if you’re not studying one of these top-earning majors, your degree will likely earn you more in the workforce. According to Forbes, the average college graduate will earn around $900,000 more than the average high school graduate throughout their lifetime. Over time, you’ll likely earn the money to pay back your student loans and earn financial independence. In the meantime, focus on your studies and know that in the end, it’ll all be worth it.

 

If you’re interested in a private student loan to help pay for college, our Personal Loan Advisors are available and would love to speak with you and answer any other questions you may have. Let’s connect.*

 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites

Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Top 10 SAT Resource Publications for Students

Preparing to head off to college in the next year or two? If so, are you stressing out about the SAT? Colleges use SAT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships. The SAT has three parts: reading, writing, and math. Studying for the SAT can help familiarize you with what the test looks like, develop relevant strategies and skills, and prepare you to achieve a high score. Here’s a list of self-guided prep books that can help you prepare for the SATs.

  1. The Official SAT Study Guide – The College Board. Pages: 1,145; Price: $19.01-$19.36The Official SAT Study Guide is a publication of The College Board, the organization that creates and administers the SAT. It includes eight practice tests that are similar to the exam. Each of these tests is available as a free, downloadable PDF on The College Board’s website. In addition to the tests, the book has an additional 250 pages of instruction, guidance, and test information. This volume should form the basis of your self-guided SAT studying program.
  2. SAT Prep Black Book: The Most Effective SAT Strategies Ever Published – Mike Barrett and Patrick Barrett. Pages: 575; Price: $24.50-$28.49SAT Prep Black Book deserves a place on your bookshelf right next to The Official SAT Study Guide. The book is authored by an SAT tutor who has guided many students in preparation for the test. Readers will learn how to use the ins and outs of the SAT to their advantage. It includes a walkthrough of more than 600 official SAT questions. The publication is written in a conversational style and is full of understandable advice for doing well on the SAT.
  3. The Complete Guide to SAT Reading – Erica Meltzer. Pages: 349; Price: $29.19-$33.20The Complete Guide to SAT Reading is a comprehensive review of the reading skills required to achieve high scores on the reading section of the SAT. The author is an experienced SAT tutor who provides breakdowns of SAT Reading types of questions. She gives in-depth explanations and numerous examples of how to effectively work through every kind of problem. This book offers helpful guidance for your SAT prep, no matter your level of reading skills.
  4. SAT Vocabulary: A New Approach – Erica Meltzer and Larry Krieger. Pages: 133; Price: $17.99-$18.95SAT Vocabulary covers critical vocabulary for the reading, writing and language, and essay sections of the SAT. Rather than just providing long lists of words and their meanings to memorize, the book teaches you to understand the various contexts in which vocabulary is tested. You can then test yourself by applying what you have learned with practice exercises.
  5. The College Panda’s SAT Essay: The Battle-tested Guide for the New 2016 Essay – Nielson Phu. Pages: 64; Price: $18.99-$21.52Nielson Phu is a teacher who achieved a perfect SAT score when he took the new SAT in 2016. A copy of his high-scoring essay is included in The College Panda’s SAT Essay. And, amazingly, Phu states that he’s not a naturally gifted writer. In this book, you’ll find Phu’s tips, strategies, and resources to enable you to score well on the SAT essay, even if you don’t think you’re a “good” writer. This short book is worth reading cover-to-cover.
  6. The College Panda’s SAT Writing: Advanced Guide and Workbook for the New SAT – Nielson Phu. Pages: 270; Price: $10.29-$28.49Nielson Phu loves to write books to help students achieve a perfect SAT score. Don’t be intimidated, though – The College Panda’s SAT Writing provides comprehensive coverage of what you need to know to do well in the SAT writing and language section. It gives clear explanations of every grammar rule tested on the SAT, from the most basic to the most obscure. It also includes hundreds of examples, drills, and practice questions. To make the study of grammar less boring, Phu has even added in some fun illustrations.
  7. The College Panda’s SAT Math: Advanced Guide and Workbook for the New SAT – Nielson Phu. Pages: 254; Price: $22-$28.49The College Panda’s SAT Math is a comprehensive guide to the SAT Math section. This publication is aimed at the student reaching for a perfect score, and, in pursuit of this goal, it leaves no stone unturned. The book has clear explanations of the math concepts tested on the SAT, ranging from the simplest to the most complex. It also provides hundreds of examples, over 500 practice questions, and lists of the most common mistakes students make. Even if you don’t think you can achieve that perfect score, this book is an excellent way to brush up on your math skills.
  8. Bring Home the Score: A Private Tutor’s Guide to Scoring in the Highest Echelons of the SAT, ACT, SHSAT, GRE, GMAT, LSAT, NCLEX, MCAT, or Any Other Standardized Test – Walter Tinsley. Pages: 86; Price: $9.96-$9.97Don’t be put off by the lengthy subtitle of Bring Home the Score even if you have to look up what “echelon” means. This volume is jam-packed with tips, tricks, and strategies to land you among the top scorers on any standardized test – including the SAT. You will learn mental strategies to improve your motivation and avoid burnout from an overly aggressive study regimen. Bring Home the Score can help you create a schedule that’s intense but manageable.
  9. Solve. Create: The Insider’s Guide to the ACT and SAT –
    Scott Moser. Pages: 523; Price: $19.68-$29.95People don’t usually think that standardized tests and creativity go together. The author of this book, a private test prep tutor, bases his strategy of success in the SAT on individualization and process rather than focusing on rote memorization. Reason. Solve. Create. aims to help the reader become a better thinker. For example, the same reasoning skills that are used in writing a poem can also be applied to solving a math problem or correcting a mistake in grammar. Information pertaining only to the SAT is clearly marked.
  10. The Perfect Score Project: One Mother’s Journey to Uncover the Secrets of the SAT – Debbie Stier. Pages: 288; Price: $6.45-$16.45The Perfect Score Project is not a traditional SAT prep book but provides an interesting and insightful read for both students and parents. Debbie Stier, a single mother and an author, wanted to help her son prepare for the SAT. To this end, she took the test seven times in one year. She also studied every way possible to prep for the test. The result is a book with tried-and-tested answers to every SAT question a student might be asking themselves: When do I begin? Do I really need test prep with a big name? Do I need a tutor, a class, or can I self-study? What’s the one thing I need to know? Stier’s son did well on the SAT, and so can you.

 

All of these books can be purchased online, and the prices are for new and used books as advertised at the time (June 1, 2019) of this writing. The number of pages is approximate and is based on the table of contents for each book.

What You Need to Know About College Scholarships

 

 

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Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the web sites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

How Do You Know When It’s Time to Get a Graduate Degree?

The most recent data from the Digest of Education Statistics show that over 54% of those completing graduate studies take on student loans, and the average loan amount for grad school is over $70,000. With so much at stake, isn’t it worth a serious analysis of the value?

 

Develop a Decision Matrix to Help You Decide

A decision matrix is an analytical tool that helps you compare different factors when making a choice. If you are about to take on more student debt to continue your education, a personal decision matrix that weighs the following questions can help you clarify your values and decide what makes both personal and financial sense.

 

  • Why do you want a graduate degree? Motivation is a complex process, and you may not know what is driving you to continue your education. A little self-analysis is in order. Do you think graduate work will elevate your prestige, make you an industry authority, or help you find a more challenging job? Or are you afraid of leaving your college comfort zone and entering the workforce?

 

  • Do the jobs in your field of study match your talents and disposition? Do you thrive in a fast-paced environment or enjoy working with the public? Perhaps a predictable or solitary workplace suits you more. If you’ve never been employed in your chosen field, it might be wise to work for a while after completing your bachelor’s degree. You’ll get a better understanding of employment opportunities and personal satisfaction levels before investing more time and money toward an advanced degree. Working before pursuing a graduate program has two other distinct advantages:

 

  1. You can make progress toward paying off undergrad student loans.
  2. You will have time to solidify your life and career goals.

 

  • Will a graduate degree improve your employment and earning potential? Before committing to graduate school, do your research. Monitor the job market on sites like Indeed, Monster or Study job requirements, salaries, and the number of job openings. Talk to individuals in your field—both those with graduate degrees and those with four-year degrees. Will an advanced degree make enough difference in job availability, career stability, and earning potential to offset the time and money required to obtain it?

 

  • Are there alternatives for enhancing your employment value? Explore professional or specialized certifications that could make you more valuable to an employer. Obtaining certificates is usually less expensive than continuing with graduate studies, and added training indicates to employers that you take the initiative and possess advanced skills.

 

  • How will you pay for your advanced degree? If you already have student loans, adding more debt for graduate school could further delay your ability to achieve many financial milestones: marriage, purchasing a home, traveling, or starting a family. Often, grad school loans come with a higher interest rate and greater accumulated balance than undergraduate loans. You’ll need to determine whether the added earning potential of an advanced degree justifies the payments and payback period. It may also be worthwhile to explore alternatives like part-time studies and employer educational benefits to lessen the student loan burden.

 

Refinance Student Debt in Three Easy Steps With ELFI

You’ve graduated with a college degree and increased your earning power. Now, get the most for your money by refinancing your student loans with Education Loan Finance. Our competitive interest rates, personalized service, and nationwide availability give you the power to manage your debt and achieve your goals. With ELFI, you could be just three steps away from a brighter future!

 

Click Here to Learn More About Refinancing Student Loans

 

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Responsibilities of Cosigning A Loan

It’s often thought about pretty commonly that people will attend college. What often isn’t discussed is how people will afford to pay for their college degree. When looking for available financial aid options many look to private student loans to pay for college. Once completing the application don’t be surprised if it is denied because of your financial history or lack thereof. Unless your parents opened up a credit card account for you as an authorized user when you born, you probably won’t have a long enough credit history. Don’t be overly heartbroken, since you aren’t the only one without a long credit history. A way around not having an established credit history is to talk with a parent or guardian about being a cosigner on your student loan. This isn’t an easy process, but it can be worthwhile if both parties understand the responsibilities that are associated with cosigned student loans. Additionally, adding a cosigner to a loan may not be the right answer.

 

Having a cosigner can help qualify you for a student loan because the right cosigner should have an established credit history. As a lending institution, it would be too difficult to lend to a borrower who hasn’t yet shown that they are financially responsible. Adding a cosigner who is financially responsible, for a loan assures the lender that the loan is less of a risk and is more likely to be paid back.

 

If you like sports, think of it like a basketball game. If you’re injured and can no longer play, a substitute or someone on the team plays the game in your place. A cosigner would be your financially responsible substitute in the game of loans. If you are unable to carry the financial burden of a loan at any time and take a knee, a cosigner is expected and legally responsible to repay the debt.  Though the concept of adding a cosigner can seem fairly simple, there is a lot that goes along with it. Here are a few things to understand, before you even consider asking someone to cosign your private student loan.

 

 

Why would you need to add a cosigner to a loan?

 

There are multiple different cases why you may need a cosigner. If you have never owned a credit card, had a loan before or held any type of credit, you may have no established credit history. Even if you have had credit for a short time, there may not be enough history for the private loan company to evaluate. If you have a large loan you’re interested in taking out, it’s highly unusual that the loan will be provided to someone with a year or less of credit history. Based on your credit history a student loan company can see how often a person is paying off debt and what their credit score is. Without a credit history, it can be hard for a student loan company to evaluate if you will be on time for loan payments.  With a cosigner, the student loan company can evaluate the financial history of the cosigner and see that they are a reliable applicant.

 

Another reason that you may need a cosigner is that you have a bad credit score. If your debt-to-income ratio is too high, you have an unsteady income, or you have previous defaults on your credit history, this could be a reason why you’d need to add a cosigner. A cosigner can help qualify you for a private student loan. When having a cosigner, it is the cosigner’s loan and they are fully responsible for that loan too. Though your cosigner is not using the loan, it is equally their responsibility to make sure the loan is paid off. If you choose to ask a family member or friend to be a cosigner, it is important they understand the financial responsibility that they are taking. For example, if you do not pay your loan, your cosigner will have to pay it off. A cosigner will need to have a good credit history and consistently have responsible financial habits. You may be thinking of multiple different people who could be your cosigner. Before diving in, be sure to understand who can cosign your loan.

 

Who can cosign a loan for college?

 

When evaluating the need for a cosigner, you will need to know who is eligible. Undergraduate and graduate private loans lenders have a list of criteria that a cosigner must meet. The criteria for a cosigner will be different based on each lending institutions policy and eligibility requirements. Here’s a breakdown of some of the general eligibility requirements needed.

 

  • A cosigner must be a United States citizen and of legal age.
  • Legal age will vary by state, so it is important to look up the legal age for your state of interest.
  • As for your preference, it needs to be someone you trust. Maybe start by asking a parent or close relative.
  • Needs to have a good credit score, and has to know all the financial responsibilities of a cosigner.
  • The cosigner will be required to have a consistent employer or a steady income. If a family member is not an option, consider a dependable, close friend.
  • Some private loan companies require that the cosigner have the same address as the applicant.

 

Cosigner Responsibilities

 

Make sure your cosigner fully understands what they are committing to and that you both discuss the responsibilities needed from a cosigner. Being a cosigner can be unpredictable. As a borrower, you may not be able to pay off a loan that you have taken on and your cosigner will be accountable for the remainder of the student loan payments. This could affect a cosigner and their future. Go over the cosigner paperwork and discuss all the options you have. You both will have equal responsibility throughout the life of the loan.

 

Cosigner responsibilities include payment on any late or missing payments as per the contract of the private loan. The cosigner’s credit report will show the student loan, therefore, any late payments will affect the cosigner’s credit score. A cosigner, by cosigning, is adding more credit to their credit history. Therefore, if the cosigner needs their own loan, they may find it difficult due to the additional credit added from the private loan.

 

A creditor may have different ways of collecting loan debt, but they can garnish wages depending on the state the loan is originated in. If the loan is not paid, you or the cosigner’s employer may be required to refuse a portion of your paycheck and send it to the creditor. In addition, a private loan may have clauses included in the document. Be aware that a clause may require the loan amount paid in full at the time of a cosigner’s death. Meaning if you ask someone to be a cosigner and they pass away the debt may have to be paid in full at that time. The same can go for the cosigner if the borrower passes away, the full debt balance could be expected at the time of the borrower’s death. Open communication between you and your cosigner is vital. Go over all clauses, liabilities, and possibilities to ensure you are both aware of the circumstances.

 

Factors to consider when selecting a cosigner

 

A cosigner needs to be someone who is completely able to pay off your loan. The private loan company will want to see that the cosigner has a steady income. A steady income means that they have reliable employment or a consistent form of payment. Without a steady income, the loan company will have no evidence that your cosigner has the funds to help pay off the loan.

 

Your cosigner will need to have a decently lengthy credit history. Along with the cosigner’s credit history, the lender will review their credit score. A credit score will illustrate to the loan company that the cosigner has borrowed money previously and was able to pay it back on time. A private loan company is always looking for a trustworthy candidate that will be capable of paying back their debt. While the loan company will decide if you and your cosigner are qualified, it is important that you have a dependable cosigner.

 

Cosigning will be a long term commitment and all clauses must be considered. Good health will be a factor when choosing a cosigner. Good health may seem like an odd qualification to have. If your cosigner dies, your loan could automatically be placed in default regardless of the payments you have made. Due to unfortunate circumstances, this could have a harmful effect on your credit score.

 

Whether it a relative or close friend, you and your cosigner must be on the same page. Once you have a loan you both will share the responsibility of getting it paid off. Talk about financial barriers together. If you are unsure you can pay off the loan, let your cosigner know ahead of time. This could help prevent any devastating effects on your credit scores in the future.

 

Benefits of using a Cosigner

 

While having a cosigner is a serious decision, it does include benefits. One of the biggest advantages to adding a cosigner is that it could help you to have a better interest rate. Adding a cosigner with a good credit history, and income, private loan companies may give you a lower interest rate. How can having a cosigner get you a lower interest rate? Since your cosigner should have an established credit history and income, it means that the loan is less risky for the lending institution. If the loan is more likely to be paid back based on previous borrower history, then the lending institution will provide a more attractive interest rate on the loan. Having a lower interest rate on your loan could mean thousands of dollars saved from debt repayment.

 

Secondly, having a cosigner could assist you with your own credit. Since a cosigner gives you a better chance at receiving the loan, you’re more likely to establish the credit to further build out your credit history. Assuming you’re able to make the monthly payments on your student loan, you will start to build a credit history. If you are paying on time, this will help you to improve credit for future needs and purchases for both you and cosigner. Without a cosigner, you may not be eligible for the loan and would not be able to get a jump start on your credit. Cosigning for a debt is not something that should be taken lightly by anyone. This could be the right answer for you or it could be the wrong answer. It’s important to review all your options as a borrower and discuss the liabilities and responsibilities of cosigning with your cosigner.

 

10 Facts About Student Loans That Can Save You Money

 

How to Build Credit While in College

As a child, it’s not uncommon to think that there are monsters hiding under your bed or maybe in your closet. You never actually think it through as to what really could be hiding but it’s something scary. Trust me, you didn’t want to ever have to come face-to-face with it. Thus, my reasoning for staying in bed every night and never moving. Oh, and of course hiding my arms under the blankets. You know you did it too! Well, at twenty-eight I think I’ve finally met those monsters.  It was my credit!

Throughout my life, I was terrified of credit. I, like many others, was taught credit cards lead to lifelong debt and it could ruin my life. Not only that but any minor change like closing a credit card account affected my credit score – SCARY! Credit, like most new things in life can be intimidating or maybe even scary, but we have to start somewhere.

What most people, myself included, don’t understand about credit is that it can be a great thing when used responsibly. A good credit score can help with getting a house or buying a car. I now understand that credit is not a scary thing. Credit is only something you need to be responsible with. If you are a college student looking to build credit purchase only things that you can pay for. If you cannot guarantee that you can stay on top of payments, you shouldn’t be making purchases.

While in college, if you decide to build credit it can help jump-start your life after college. Filling out applications with your credit score will be easy because you’ve already started building credit.  In college, credit can be built through everyday expenses and can benefit you in the long run. Here are some simple ways of building credit that will not break the bank or “ruin your life,” but help you in the future.

Find a Credit Card

While in college, you may see a credit card offer dropped in your mailbox every week. Actually reading through the information and what the card offers is KEY. Look at interest rates and cash back rewards. Some cards have cash back rewards on points earned by using the card on things such as gas and groceries. By using a credit card for necessities and paying it off, you are earning easy credit while still in college.

Some cards offer cash back opportunities on travel. If you’re going away to college, using a credit card could be a great way to earn points for a visit back home or a weekend getaway. Remember, use a credit card on things you will be able to pay back on time. This way you will be building credit while also gaining reward points to redeem on things you want to do.

If you’re attending college you may want to check out student credit cards. Student credit cards can be a really great way to start building credit while you are in school. Be warned that you will still need to demonstrate a decent salary to qualify for a student credit card, simply being a student is not enough. Most student credit cards will not charge an annual fee and many offer additional perks.

 

Learn How Completing College Early Can Save You Money

 

Secure Credit Cards

If you don’t qualify for a student credit card or any traditional credit card because you don’t have a credit history look into secure credit cards. They work just like other credit cards but require a cash deposit, first. This deposit is usually in the hundreds or low thousands. If you make every payment in full and on time you’ll receive back your down payment. If you do not make payments on time or in full the lender keeps your down payment.

Rent

While being in college you will likely be moving into your FIRST apartment. An apartment can be a great way to start earning credit. Putting the rent in your name and paying it on time can assist in building credit. In order for rent to go towards your credit history, your landlord must be reporting the rent payments to one of the credit agencies. If your landlord isn’t reporting your rental payments it will not help you to build a credit history. In today’s society, it is also pretty uncommon for landlords to report rent payments to a credit agency.

If your landlord isn’t reporting your rent payments to a credit agency it can’t hurt to ask if they could start! When sharing an apartment with roommates, it is vital for everyone living there to pay their share of rent on time. Finding roommates that share accountability is important when you are building a good credit score.

Get a Credit Builder Loan

A loan that is in place to IMPROVE CREDIT?! Sign me up! When you have a credit builder loan, you make payments into your savings account. After one year, you will get the amount you paid back and increase your credit score! A credit builder loan does not require good credit to begin, you just have to show proof of income. Start by applying for a credit builder loan, and begin to make payments on time. In order for you to be benefiting from a credit builder loan, you must be paying on time. The pros to a credit builder loan include getting the money you put in and having a better credit score at the end of the year!

Become an Authorized User

Becoming an authorized user is a smart and easy way to embark on creating credit while in college. Being an authorized user means that you can use another person’s credit card and your name will be included on the account. The process simply has the account user add your name to the credit card account. As an authorized user, you will not be responsible for paying back debts on the credit card. This responsibility will legally be in the original account holder’s name. The main goal for being an authorized user is to increase your credit score by having an account holder with an outstanding credit history. If you have an account holder who is known for paying their debt on time, this will increase your score, because you’re on the account. Keep in mind that you should ask someone who is trusted and reliable when becoming an authorized user.

Start on Student Loan Payments

As a former college student, I know that going to school full time while working enough to have money to start paying off student loans can seem impossible. Remember, you do not have to pay off large amounts right away. While in college, consider putting money aside to start paying off loans when you can.

If you start loan payments early you will start to see positive growth on your credit score. The benefits of having student loans include helping build your credit score. If you decide to start paying off loans while in school, it will be before your loan deadline and will create less to pay off later. Even if you are not able to pay off large sums, these small amounts can make for fewer payments later on and a better credit score when you graduate from college.

Credit Utilization

A top way to build credit is not to utilize all the credit that is available to you. For example, if you have a credit card with a credit limit of $2,500 and the balance is $2,500 that would be 100% credit utilization. Credit utilization is important because it impacts your credit score. The maximum recommended credit utilization is about 30%. Therefore, if your credit card had a maximum limit of $2,500 then 30% of that would be $750. In this example, to avoid negatively impacting your credit score you should not spend over $750 on your credit card.

It can be difficult to be disciplined as a college student, but it’s important to remember that this money is not free. It’s also likely that this is probably your first credit card ever! Exciting, but this is a really important rule of thumb! This is a credit that you will eventually need to pay back. In an effort to build credit you want to be sure you’re creating good financial habits for yourself too. Be sure to stay disciplined and not utilize over 30% of your credit card.

BONUS: Credit Reports

While we are on the topic of creating good financial habits, the number one habit you can create is looking at your credit report. If you talk with any financial expert, this will be their number one piece of advice! Yearly, check your credit score and your credit report. Think about it like an annual physical at the doctor, but for your finances. Review your credit report to make sure that there are no errors or fraud to your credit history. If you visit AnnualCreditReport.com you can receive a free credit report from all three major credit agencies in the U.S. and a free credit report can be requested every 12 months.

Having paid off debt or using credit in college will prepare you for future payments on cars, houses, and throughout your adult life. Knowing your responsibilities and taking care of payments on time is key to achieving a better credit score by the end of your college career. Consider these options when deciding how to build credit and choose one that will benefit you in the long run.

 

Are Student Loans Impacting Your Credit Score?

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.