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Best Apps for Budgeting in College

Managing money is hard, but budgeting in college? That’s a whole different ballgame. For a lot of students, you have so much to worry about with classes, work, and other involvements that finances often slip your mind. So how do you hold yourself to a budget when you can barely remember to feed yourself dinner? Luckily, we live in an age full of apps to help you get a jumpstart on budgeting and money management. Here are a few of our favorites.

 

Mint®. Mint is a free mobile app where you can view all of your banking accounts in the same place. It automatically updates and puts your transactions into categories so you can see where all your money is going – and where it’s coming from. It also recommends changes to your budget that could help you save money. Its features include a bill payment tracker, a budget tracker, alerts, budget categorization, investments, and security features.

 

PocketGuard®. Like Mint, PocketGuard allows you to link your credit cards, checking, and savings accounts, investments and loans to view them all in one place. It automatically updates and categorizes your transactions so you can see real-time changes. PocketGuard also has an “In My Pocket” feature that shows you how much spending money you have remaining after you’ve paid bills and set some funds aside. You can set your financial goals, and this clever app will even create a budget for you.

 

Wally®. This personal finance app is available for the iPhone, with a Wally+ version available for Android users. Like other apps on this list, it allows you to manage all of your accounts in one place and learn from your spending habits. You can plan and budget your finances by looking at your patterns, upcoming payments and expenses, and make lists for your expected spending.

 

MoneyStrands®. Once again, with this app, you’ll have access to all the accounts you connect. Its features allow you to analyze your expenses and cash flow, become a part of a community, track and plan for spending, create budgets and savings goals, and know what you can spend without going over budget.

 

Albert®. A unique feature that Albert emphasizes is its alert system. When you’re at risk for overspending, the app will send you an alert. The app also sends you real-time alerts when bills are due. Enjoy a smart savings feature, guided investing, and the overall ability to visualize your money’s flow and create a personalized budget.

 

Before you download any budgeting app, make sure you check out the reviews and ensure it’s legitimate. Because a lot of apps ask for your personal financial information, it’s essential you verify their legitimacy before entering your account number. Listen to what other people have to say and then choose the option that works best for you, because not every app will be perfect for everyone. Budgeting in college may be hard, but downloading an app is just one way you can make it easier. Maybe you don’t want to use an app at all. If you’re in that boat, you can check out some other approaches to budgeting here or here.

 


 

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

 

Note about mobile applications: Some mobile applications may charge fees or allow you to purchase access to content or features through one-time or subscription-based payments.

5 Financial Tips for After You Refinance Student Loans

The process of refinancing student loans can be like studying for finals: you prepare for weeks, the stress keeps you up at night, and once the big day finally passes, you feel a huge sense of relief. You might even go out with friends to celebrate. But like college, you can’t just forget what you learned. You have to apply that knowledge to the next step. 

 

When it comes to refinancing student loans, the next step is to continue honing your financial savviness. Find other ways to reduce and quickly pay off debts so you can start spending money on the things you want, instead of the things you need! Below are five tips to consider after refinancing student loans. 

Pay Down Other Debts

Take the extra amount you paid toward that student loan and apply it to other debts. With a $50,000 loan at an 8% interest rate, you could owe approximately $480/month for 15 years. Your total interest over the life of the loan is $36,000. But if you’re able to reduce that interest rate to just 6%, your monthly payment drops to $420/month and the total interest paid is $26,000. What could you do with an extra $60/month? What could you do with an extra $10,000 over 10 years? A lot. 

 

Consider all the types of debt and ongoing expenses you have that you could apply that $10,000 toward:

  • Credit cards
  • Car loans
  • Home loans
  • Medical bills
  • Childcare
  • Cell phone bills
  • Utility bills

 

You can also opt to keep that extra money aimed at your loan. Refinancing student loans often establishes terms with no prepayment penalties. So paying off loans faster can alleviate the burden of debt. This can take many forms, including:

  • Make an extra payment: In addition to your minimum monthly payment (12 payments a year), consider an extra payment every few months. In the example above, if you save $60/month on your refinanced student loan, you will have enough money for a whole extra payment every 7 months, with no additional work done on your part. Just a little saving!
  • Pay more than the minimum: If you don’t want to worry about orchestrating extra payments, overpay during each regular monthly payment. By going above and beyond the minimum payment, you’ll keep from accruing as much interest on your principal balance. Going back to our example again, if you were to keep that extra $60 applied to your monthly payment of $420 (for a total of $480), you could pay off your loan 2–3 years earlier at a savings of $5,000. It might seem tempting to use that extra $60 as play money right now, but $5,000 could be an even bigger play day in the future!
  • Make single lump-sum payments: Use your tax return, annual bonus, or an inheritance to make lump-sum payments toward the principal balance on your refinanced student loan. Again, the mindset here is to pay off that loan as fast and comfortably as you can.  

Negotiate Other Bills or Debts

Don’t stop while you’re on a roll. Once you secure better terms for your loan, find other ways to lower your bills. Use that financial savvy you picked up refinancing student loans, and negotiate with other debt collectors. This negotiation isn’t limited to loans—you can often get better rates with your cable and internet provider too. 

 

You also likely have a dozen or more automatic monthly payments coming out of your checking account or linked to a credit card. Some banks or apps like Truebill® and Trim® can help you find and cancel subscriptions that are unused or that you forgot you signed up for in the first place. What started as $60/month saved could possibly turn into $150/month after canceling unused subscriptions. 

Consolidate Credit Card Debt

You can consolidate loans, but did you know you can also consolidate credit card debt? If you have multiple cards that you owe money on, you can roll those cards into a single loan. Depending on your credit score and other factors, a consolidated loan can have lower interest or a lower, more achievable payment. You could also take out a personal loan with a lower rate to pay off cards directly with the credit card company.

Keep At It

Refinancing only sounds like the hard part. The real challenge comes after you sign the papers. Getting a new interest rate and a new loan term won’t save you money if you don’t make on-time payments and pay off your loan according to those new terms. Adult life has a lot more things on its to-do list. Set up automatic payments so you don’t risk forgetting. At the very least,   set monthly reminders in your calendar app to write a check or manually process your payment. 

Tell Your Friends

ELFI offers options for student loans and refinancing student loans. But did you know ELFI also has a referral program1 that can help you make (and save) even more money? Sign up and create a personalized referral link to share with friends or family. When someone refinances using your link, you’ll get a $400 referral bonus check and your friend will receive a $100 credit toward the principal balance of an Education Loan Finance loan. There’s no limit on the number of people you can refer. Learn more at elfi.com/referral-program-student-loan-refinance.

 

 

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

 

Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.

 

1Subject to credit approval. Program requirements apply. Limit one $400 cash bonus per referral. Offer available to those who are above the age of majority in their state of legal residence who refer new customers who refinance their education loans with Education Loan Finance. The new customer will receive a $100 principal reduction on the new loan within 6-8 weeks of loan disbursement. The referring party will be mailed a $400 cash bonus check within 6-8 weeks after both the loan has been disbursed, and the referring party has provided ELFI with a completed IRS form W-9. Taxes are the sole responsibility of each recipient. A new customer is an individual without an existing Education Loan Finance loan account and who has not held an Education Loan Finance loan account within the past 24 months. Additional terms and conditions apply.

How to Build Your Child’s Credit Score When They Don’t Have One Yet

From the 2007 Housing Crisis, 2008 Stock Market Crash, and now the student debt crisis there is no surprise parents nationwide are looking to educate and protect their children on finances. Many people during these national events lacked basic financial know-how and self-discipline. Gen-Xers and millennials, starting to have children of their own, worry that a new generation could be seduced by the allure of instant gratification and the digital disconnect between earning and spending money. What as a parent can you do for a young child to teach them finances and help them learn the basics? Here are some basic tips to help your children build healthy credit and learn to use it responsibly.

 

Start With Basic Financial Life Lessons

Whether your child is 2 or 22, financial education is the key to building good credit and financial independence. Erin Lowry, business blogger and author of Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together, explained in a recent podcast that her parents taught her about delayed gratification early in life. “I was really encouraged from a very young age to start making money, especially if I wanted something,” Lowry said.

 

Saving for discretionary purchases is a lesson many young children can miss. A growing number of young adults also don’t have realistic expectations of their future earning power. Lowry grew up in a different reality. She explains that her first successful enterprise was at age 7, selling doughnuts at a family garage sale. Before she could feel too excited about her earnings, her father adjusted the amount she made by taking out the cost of the doughnuts and wages for her sister. He explained that the money left was her profit. “He actually took the money,” she remembers. “That is something that has stuck with me forever.”

 

It’s never too late to teach lessons like these. Resources for financial education are abundant in print and online, and parents can refer adult children to Lowry’s book and her blog, brokemillennial.com. For younger children, check out this post by Dave Baldwin, “The Five Best Apps for Teaching Kids How to Manage Their Money.”

 

Three Tips for Establishing Good Credit for Your Children

Parents with good credit and a clear vision of their children’s financial future can take these three actions to ensure a sound credit score for children reaching adulthood.

 

TIP 1: Make your child an authorized credit card user.

There is no minimum age to most credit cards, so you can add your child as an authorized user as early as you like. The best part is you do not have to give the child access to the card, just keep it in a safe place. It’s imperative that you use the credit card wisely and are able to pay the minimum monthly balance on the card. If you are unable to make payments on the card that could negatively affect your child’s credit history too. Try to only use the card for reoccurring balances like gas or food shopping.

 

When your child comes of age to have their first credit card in adulthood, they will benefit from your history of timely payments and reasonable use of credit. It will also benefit them if they need a loan to attend college and you as a parent may not need to be a cosigner.

 

TIP 2: Add a FREE credit freeze to your child’s credit report until they reach age 18.

Contact each of the three reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion, to request a freeze in your child’s name. In some states, the freeze may need to be renewed every seven years. A credit freeze is fairly simple to implement and will protect your child from identity theft, which in turn will protect their credit history and credit score. You can also lift credit freezes when your child is ready to apply for credit.

 

It may seem like an extreme to put a credit freeze on your two months old credit but it will only protect them in the long run. Identity theft to children is an unfortunate reality in the United States. According to CNBC, more than 1 million minors were victims of identity theft or fraud in 2017. What may be even more surprising is that data breaches are just as much a problem for minors as for adults, if not more. According to CNBC, only 19% of adults were fraud victims compared to a staggering 39% of minors due to data breaches. This can happen to your child, but it can be prevented. You have the power to protect your children from falling victim to fraud. Not to mention a credit freeze is free thanks to recent laws passed by the federal government, so it won’t even cost you or your family a dime.

 

To learn more about protecting your child’s credit and preventing identity theft, visit the Federal Trade Commission’s Consumer Information site.

 

TIP 3: Set up a secure credit card account for your child to use.

A secure credit card is similar to an unsecured or the “normal” type of credit card. The only major difference is that a deposit is used to open a secured credit card account. The amount of secured credit card deposit is usually the credit limit of that secured credit card. Now, as long as all payments are made on time and in full at the end of the designated period you’ll receive your deposit back. Additionally, that fact that all payments were made on time and in full means that you should see that reflected in your credit report and you may even see that reflected in your credit score. If your child fails to make on-time payments or fails to pay the full amount of the card this could hurt your child’s credit instead of helping it.

 

If you choose to give your teenager a secured credit card you should be certain that you discuss the responsibilities of card with them. Make sure your child is committed to paying on time, staying within the credit limit, and using the card for only appropriate expenses you have discussed in advance. This is a great responsibility to provide a teenager because it really gives them the ability to start developing good financial habits. Whether that is putting an alert in their cell phone when the payment is due or if that is handwriting it on a calendar. Additionally, your child will have the opportunity to really learn to budget and live within their means. These are fundamental finance lessons and habits that will help to lay the groundwork of what could be a very financially responsible young person.

 

Financial Outlook

 

Regardless of what ways you choose to teach your child about credit or build their credit, know that your outlook on finances can easily become your child’s. If you find yourself scared of money, it’s likely your child will too. So often children learn relationships based on what they see their parents doing, so be sure that you’re laying the right framework for them to be successful. It doesn’t have to be an overly complex and if you aren’t sure that what you are teaching them is correct try looking locally for classes or programs. You should be able to find some financial literacy courses either online or within your local community. These can really help your child to familiarize themselves with common financial terms and create good financial habits. Good financial habits include how to save money, charitable giving, and even what taxes are.  No one knows your child better than you and no one wants them to succeed more than you, so be sure to give them the right tools and resources to do so.

 

Ask These 10 Questions When Hiring a Financial Advisor

 

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

What is a Prepayment Penalty? What’s the Catch?

Imagine finally paying off your loan just to find out you owe the lender more money!  All because you’ve paid your debt off early. Instead of your lender rewarding you for paying the loan off earlier than your contract states, they charge you extra. Here’s what that is, how to avoid it, and what you can do.

 

What is a prepayment penalty?

 

A prepayment penalty is a fee charged to a borrower. If you pay off your loan earlier before the date planned in the contract the lender could charge you a prepayment penalty.

 

A prepayment penalty is charged once you’ve completed paying your debt, if it was paid it off early, or it could be a fee for overpaying the scheduled amount set per year. A prepayment penalty can be a fixed amount or based on what the remaining balance of your loan was set to be. For example, certain loans may allow you to pay off 20% extra each year before facing a fee.

What are prepayment penalties for?

 

When you borrow from an institution, they assume that it will take you a certain amount of time to repay the debt back, with interest. If you pay back your debt sooner, that institution may lose out on the interest that they collect. For this reason, loans like a mortgage might have a prepayment penalty to discourage people from refinancing or selling within the first few years.

 

You can think of a prepayment penalty as a way for the institution to ensure that it makes an adequate return amount for the credit they lent. Additionally, lenders charge prepayment penalties because if they place the loan in security and sell it, they need verification that the loan will be outstanding for a particular period of time. Having the security outstanding for a period of time will provide the buyer of the security a yield.

 

Student Loans

There are so many benefits to paying extra on your student loans each month. One of the main benefits – you’ll pay less interest over the life of the student loan. When it comes to student loans, you may be surprised to find out that there are no prepayment penalties. That’s right no prepayment penalties for both federal and private student loans. According to the Higher Education Opportunity Act of August 2008: “It shall be unlawful for any private educational lender to impose a fee or penalty on a borrower for early repayment or prepayment of any private education loan.”

 

Before you begin making extra payments towards your student loans, you should contact your servicer. Verify that the additional payment is being applied to the principal balance of the loan and not to the interest. If the overpayment is directed to the principal you’ll be able to pay down the debt faster.

 

Mortgage Loans

Mortgages don’t always have prepayment penalties, but some do. If there is a prepayment fee on your mortgage you should be able to review the details in the mortgage contract. It’s vital when signing a contract that you pay attention to the fine print. If you don’t understand something or need further clarity, be sure to ask questions.

 

When dealing with Mortgages, if you chose to refinance your loan there could be a prepayment penalty. Typically if you choose to refinance within the first three or five years of having the loan there may be a prepayment penalty fee that applies.  If you ever have any questions about prepayment fees you should contact your mortgage lender for clarity.

 

Auto Loans

When taking out an auto loan there are two types of interest that may be used in your contract, simple interest or pre-computed interest. Simple interest works similarly to a student loan, it is calculated based on the balance of the loan. Therefore, if you have an auto loan with simple interest, the sooner you can pay your loan off, the less interest you’ll pay.

 

The other type of interest is pre-computed interest. This interest is included in your agreement. It is a fixed amount calculated and added on at the beginning of the contract. Using a pre-computed interest rate is typically when you encounter prepayment penalties. Similar to mortgage loans it isn’t guaranteed that these loans have a prepayment penalty, but if so, it should be in the contract. Be sure to contact your lender or institution that services the loan to find out if there are any prepayment penalties before paying extra towards your debt.

 

Personal Loans

Personal loans can be used for a number of different reasons, from medical expenses to travel or even wedding expenses. When it comes to the prepayment penalty for personal loans, most companies will charge a percentage of the remaining balance. Though it’s likely your personal loan won’t have a prepayment penalty, you could still have one. Check with your lending institution or be sure to closely review your contract to see if there are any penalty fees for paying your debt down earlier.

 

 

Soft Penalty vs. Hard Penalty

 

You may have heard of two different types of prepayment penalties: soft and hard. A soft prepayment penalty would charge you a fee for refinancing, but not for other situations. A hard prepayment penalty would charge you for refinancing, prepayment, or selling (in the case of a mortgage – selling your house).

 

How can prepayment penalties affect you?

 

First, assuming you have multiple bills and debts that you pay each month, knowing whether any of them have a prepayment penalty can change how you pay. Imagine you have a student loan and a mortgage loan, you know the student loan doesn’t have any prepayment penalties, but the mortgage loan does. Let’s say that you’ve received some additional income and you want to put it towards one of the loans, but you aren’t sure which one. You’ll want to pay additional money toward the student loan debt because you won’t get penalized for paying it off early. Knowing a loan you’ve applied for has a prepayment penalty might motivate you to find a different borrower and give you the freedom to pay off that debt sooner without a fee.

 

Does this mean you should never pay off debts early? No way! There are plenty of loans and other types of debts that won’t have a prepayment penalty. The important thing is to know what you’re getting into. Read the fine print and ask questions during the application process. Also, for loans like a mortgage, there is typically a page you sign toward the end of the process that includes disclosures on things like whether there is a prepayment penalty, balloon payment, and so on. Always be aware of those disclosures before you take on new debt.

 

What is lifestyle creep? Is it affecting you?

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Comparing Salary to the Cost of Living

Recently, CNBC released an article discussing student loan debt in relation to locations throughout the United States. This has many questioning whether they can find a job title in their field where they want to live, that will support their current bills, payments, lifestyle, and student loans. Depending on the location and cost of living, you could be making thousands less in one location when compared to another. To add more insult you could be expected to pay off more than you are capable of based on your location. When searching for a career path, it’s vital to consider where your job title is going to be the most successful and where you can afford your current lifestyle. Here are some important factors to keep in mind when

Location Expenses

Consider the cost of living in a variety of locations.  Everyday costs like food, housing, utilities, and transportation can all vary depending on where you live in the United States. Let’s see how a location can be affected by each of these variables.

Generally, big cities are known to be more costly compared to rural areas.  The Bureau of Economic Analysis tracks price levels for food, housing and education in each state and compares them to the national level. This information can be put into a dollar value scale to simplify which states are more expensive to live in than others. For example, the value of a dollar in New York, Hawaii, and California is less than the national average dollar. Meaning your dollar bill is comparable to some cent values in other locations. In states like Kansas, Kentucky, and Ohio that are not as urbanized the dollar values higher than the national average dollar. Meaning your dollar goes a little further in these areas.

 

Housing Costs

You may be asking, “What makes big cities so pricey?” and there are actually a few different reasons. The main drive for high priced locations is housing. For cities with a high population, there needs to be an abundance of housing. A high population causes overcrowded cities to have a limited amount of space for the number of people wanting to live there.   A high housing demand creates steep prices in the market because everyone is in need of a place to live. If the city life is looking a little out of budget for you, remember living outside the city and commuting is an option, and may be more cost-effective. Aside from the costs of housing, costs like transportation, utilities, and insurance may affect the cost of living.

 

Transportation Costs

We all know how expensive a car, gas, and maintenance can be. When commuting to work or even the supermarket, the distance between point A and point B will affect the amount of money you spend. .Whereas, living in the city you may literally be paying for convenience. You may be spending $200 or more a month on a permanent parking spot for your car, in addition to spending money on transportation fees. For example, in New York you could take a bus to the subway station, costing you around $2.50. Then you commute to work on the subway, costing you another $2.75. If you do this twice a day (at least) the commute will cost $10.50. Spending $10.50 five days a week for a month will get you to a grand total of $210.00 not even considering additional outings.  Please note that these prices may not be the same for all locations. For example, the average bus fare in Los Angeles is $1.75, but in Washington DC the bus fare ranges from $2.00-$5.00 depending on the commute.

 

Utilities

Utilities will also affect the cost of living, the amount depending on where you live. The cost of utilities can vary based on government regulations. Things like how much water, electricity, and gas, you are consuming can be dependent based on the weather where you are located. If you are living in a location where the winter can get very cold, that could be making a dent in your wallet on utility bills. For example, Alaska, Connecticut, and Massachusetts have an average electric rate of $21.62 per Kwh (kilowatt hour) a month.  In a place where it is always warm like Hawaii, the air conditioning may be used more frequently and the average electric rate would be $32.40 per Kwh a month.

 

Additional utility costs may include garbage removal and sewage costs. In the United States, the average cost for garbage removal is from $12.00 -$20.00 a household. Sewage rates are usually included in water rates that can be viewed with the electricity bill and can altogether be around $50.00.  In some cases, if you are living in an apartment, utilities like garbage removal and sewage will be included in your rent, or it can be separate on your electricity bill. Talk to your landlord or call housing management to find out what is included.

 

Insurance

Besides housing, transportation, and utilities, you will have car insurance, renter’s insurance.  The average rate for car insurance in the United States is $118.63 per month but can vary based on the location you are in. For example, the average cost of auto insurance in North Carolina is $865 each year while the average cost of auto insurance in Oklahoma is $1,542 a year. T Auto insurance pricing can depend on the company you have insurance with, your age, and even your gender!  For example, some companies will have a 1% price difference between genders.

 

If you choose to live in the city, it’s likely you may find yourself renting. Renter’s insurance is an additional cost you’ll want to consider.  The average, renter’s insurance in the United State is $187 per year. Renter’s insurance can be more expensive in some areas due to population and crime. If you live in a high populated area, insurance could be priced higher because the crime risk is higher.  The insurance company takes greater measures to cover your belongings in high populated areas. Renter’s insurance in Florida has an average rate of $217 per month, while in South Dakota the average rate is $118 a month.

 

Before completely scaring you back into your parent’s house for life, there are a few resources you can use to find a job and field of your choice, in areas that could be most profitable.

 

Job Search Resources

 

SimplyHired

https://www.simplyhired.com/salaries

SimplyHired will estimate the salary your specific job will be making in different locations. All you have to do is type in the job title you are looking for, and the city and state, into the search engine. Using this tool you can find out things like a nurse can make $50,000 in Dallas, Texas but, in Indianapolis, Indiana is making closer to $40,000. Although this does not calculate the cost of living, this website pulls up jobs from all over the United States. SimplyHired gives users easy access to salary information when starting to compare careers in different regions.

 

Check Out These 3 Steps to Negotiating Salary

 

Expatistan

https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/nashville

Cost of living is an important factor when searching for a location that is right for you and your preferred career. Hence why we created this helpful blog! Expatistan has a feature that pulls up a spreadsheet estimating how lifestyle choices may cost in different cities or even countries. For example, when searching in Nashville, Tennessee, Expatistan created a page that included potential prices for food, housing, clothes, transportation, personal care, and entertainment. Expatistan estimated:

 

Rent 900 Sq Foot Apartment – $1,408/month

Lunchtime Meal – $14

Sports Shoes – $98

Shampoo– $6

 

This website is a great place to find detailed estimates of what you may be spending on everyday items.  A tool like this can be very helpful when trying to manage the salary and lifestyle you are looking for.

 

CNN Money

https://money.cnn.com/calculator/pf/cost-of-living/index.html

After finding an estimated salary and cost of living for a specific location, you can compare it to other areas with CNN Money Cost of Living Calculator.  You’ll need to input

  • where you live now
  • where you are considering living
  • give an estimate of how much your salary is now (or what the salary is in the field you are searching for)

Based on the information provided, the calculator will estimate how much you would be making somewhere else. For example, if you live in Atlanta, Georgia right now and are making $50,000 a year, and you would like to move to Bozeman, Montana, the comparable salary is $50,709, which is around the same amount. Now if you moved, from Atlanta with a $50,000 salary to San Francisco, the comparable salary is $97,470. Once again, the cost of living will factor in what you can afford in each region.

 

Comparing salaries, regions, and the cost of living can help you determine where you’re aspiring jobs can be the most beneficial for your lifestyle. Consider where you will have the most financial wiggle room. Educate yourself on the cost of housing, transportation, utilities, and insurance before jumping into the car moving to a new city. Optimize your options by looking at the cost of convenience versus living outside of a location for less and other opportunities. What city you will feel the most at home in? If you are not satisfied with your options, try a different job title or location, you’re not a tree. Scope out all of your alternatives and find one that betters your lifestyle in the long run.

Top 7 Money Mistakes For Young Professionals

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

Resources

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/economy/2018/05/10/cost-of-living-value-of-dollar-in-every-state/34567549/

https://ask.metafilter.com/37074/Why-is-it-more-expensive-to-live-in-a-city 

https://www.priceoftravel.com/595/public-transportation-prices-in-80-worldwide-cities/

https://www.chooseenergy.com/electricity-rates-by-state/

https://www.thezebra.com/auto-insurance/average-auto-insurance/#state

https://www.valuepenguin.com/average-cost-renters-insurance#nogo

https://www.valuepenguin.com/average-cost-life-insurance#nogo

Benefits and Savings of Completing College Early

People usually think of completing college in four years as a typical timeline. In reality, many undergrads find that working in the summer or studying abroad can add extra time to getting their degree. According to the NY Times, only 19% of college graduates at public universities finish a Bachelor’s Degree in four years. Most experts use the timeline of six years to complete a Bachelor’s and three years to complete an Associate’s Degree. There’s nothing wrong with taking more time, but there are advantages to getting college completed early. Here are some reasons you may want to take an extra class each semester or stay on campus for summer classes to finish early.

 

Less time in school means less money spent on college.

Think about the extra fees you pay each semester. From parking permits, recreation center fees, and fees charged per department. The longer that you’re in school for, the more you will end up paying in fees. Taking more classes at once won’t save you on overall tuition necessarily. Taking more classes will lower the amount you’re paying for being in school, over time. Plus, tuition has the tendency to go up over time, and rarely goes down. Therefore, taking more classes now could save you on tuition in the long run since you’ll avoid rate hikes.

 

The cost of college will depend on the type of college you attend. The cost difference between public school and private schools may be surprising. When looking at the cost of public schools whether a college is in-state or out-of-state from your current residence will also play a role in the cost. We broke down the cost of college into three separate categories public in-state, public out-of-state or (public OOS) as can be seen below, and private. We calculated the costs for a 4-year completion, 5-year completion, and 6-year completion. These costs were based on averages provided by Value Penguin.

 

 

The below graph shows what the cost for 6 years of school will ultimately cost the borrower at each of these three types of colleges. The cost of a private college for six years equates to the cost of a Rolls Royce Wraith. Just to put that in perspective for you, Gwen Stefani the previous singer of the band No Doubt owns this car. It’s important to understand if something like studying abroad will set you back a semester or not. Yes, studying abroad is a great experience, but are you prepared to tackle the debt that may come along with delaying your academic career?

6-Year Costs of College

Public In-State School – $172,277.15

Public Out-Of-State School – $266,177.15

Private School – $325,937.15

 

 

The overall cost of college can seem overwhelming, but it’s important to understand what you’re spending by staying in school longer. It will help you to understand if the cost of an education is worth the field that you are studying to enter into. In addition, the college that you choose will have an impact on what you have to pay to achieve that education. For example, if it takes you five years to graduate there could be a price difference of about $128,050.00. The cost of college really is impacted by the type of school you choose in addition to the amount of time you spend there.

 

5-Year Costs of College

Public In-State School – $142,255.75

Public Out-Of-State School – $220,505.75

Private School – $270,305.75

 

It’s tough these days to graduate from college in 4 years, but it’s still doable. If you work closely with your counselor and study hard you’ll be on the right track. If you need summer classes they are typically available as well.

 

4-Year Costs of College

Public In-State School – $112,799.70

Public Out-Of-State School – $175,399.70

Private School – $215,239.70

 

If you enter college determined and know what you want to do, it will save you a decent amount of money. The difference between graduating in four and six years can be extreme in some cases. Below is an illustration of the cost difference between four and six years. Notice the cost difference specifically between a public out-of-state school and a private school.

 

Cost Difference Between 4 Years & 6 Years

Public In-State School – $59,477.45

Public Out-Of-State School – $90,777.45

Private School – $110,697.45

 

One of the most important parts of preparing for college is understanding how you will pay for it, how long you’ll be in school for, and if you can graduate early. If you have the ability to graduate early you should certainly consider it. At the same time, it’s important that you don’t overwhelm yourself.

 

Get to work, work, work, work, work.

It’s hard to apply for a job and commit to a typical work schedule when you’re still in school. If you can work throughout school and put contributions to your loans that is a great thing to do. If you can’t work at a traditional job, that’s okay too, but be sure that you are doing all the work you can to finish early. Completing your degree earlier can give you the ability to start looking for a job in your career field earlier. That extra year or two of working at a professional career job will put you at an advantage.

 

Bring home the (much better) bacon.

With your degree completed, it’s likely that you’ll qualify for higher-paying positions in your field. If you already have a job that you like and want to stay with the same company, chances are you’ll be worth more once you’ve got that degree in your hand.

 

Find more time.

When you’re done with school, you’ll have more time to work, build your resume, or balance commitments with life. Lots of students experience burnout, especially when they’re working while going to school, or taking a heavy study load. Add things like internships and clubs to that list and it just sounds overwhelming. Post-college, you will likely have more time to balance working, taking care of yourself, and pursuing other hobbies. Working full-time is still a commitment, but compared to working, taking 18 credits, and being in a student org. graduating might feel like a relief to your schedule.

 

Spend less money on college living.

It might make sense to have a meal plan or live on campus while you’re in school. Be aware those things are notoriously more expensive than how the rest of your community probably lives. By getting a shared apartment with friends or other young professionals, meal planning each week and doing your own shopping – you can usually save money.

 

Have more control over your schedule.

You know how it goes with classes. Sometimes you try to fit all of your classes into two days so you can have more free time. Try using your free time to work or study on days off. Coming across a required class that doesn’t pair with your schedule can ruin a lot of possibilities. By graduating, you’ll have fewer of those college-imposed restrictions on your time.

 

Get on with adulting!

Sure, many of us joke about the downsides of adulting, but it’s also nice to pick where you live and what you do. You can make choices like how to budget and what your financial and personal goals are. If you’re in a relationship, you can decide together what the next chapter holds or start making bigger plans together. If you’re unattached, you can go anywhere and don’t have to worry about credits transferring. The world is your oyster!

 

There are some instances where it absolutely makes sense to slow down your progress toward a degree. It’s okay if you need to take more than the typical two- or four-year (or even three- or six-year) track. Working parents or non-traditional students may find they can comfortably handle a half-time load with their other commitments. A full-time course schedule may be impossible to maintain for them. If you’re already working in a job that you like and are getting reimbursed for school, going at a slower pace could actually put you at a tax advantage. Not to mention some people take fewer classes at a time so they can pay more out of pocket and take out less in student loans. You should choose what works for you and helps you progress toward the ultimate goal of getting the education to support your dreams. Just make sure you have a plan that works for you and keeps you motivated to graduate!

 

Here’s How to Cut A Budget

 

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Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

 

Medical Match Day Finance Tips

Congratulations you’ve worked hard been through multiple interviews and finally, your hard work has paid off! You’ve been matched and you’re getting ready for residency. It’s so exciting to jump into residency and see what having this career will really be like. You’ll have the ability to learn from experienced professionals in your field of interest. Getting yourself prepared for your residency can feel stressful, but it doesn’t need to be. Here are some financial tips to help you get settled and make good choices for your future.

 

Set Up Loan Payments

Once you are done with school, you should start paying on student loans. Residency can take several years to complete. It’s likely that your residency isn’t paying you what a full-time position in your career will so all the medical school debt that’s accumulated, can be difficult to sort through. If you find yourself with a large amount of federal student loan debt, look into income-based repayment plans. We would recommend this as a temporary solution until you’ve completed your residency program.  This will assure that you’re making student loan payments towards your medical school debt, but that those payments are not impossible to complete. You may eventually qualify for public loan forgiveness on your federal student loans. If you qualify to get on an IBR plan in residency after completing the program you may only have a few years remaining.

 

 

If you also have private student loans there is no need to worry. Most private student loan lenders will work with you to offer some type of payment plan. You may want to consider refinancing your medical student loan debt. In order to qualify for student loan refinancing, you may need to add a cosigner due to income you’ll be making in your residency. Regardless of which route you chose, in the first few months after graduation, you’ll want to have your payment plan set up. Don’t let this task fall off your radar—in-school deferment ends shortly after graduation for most kinds of medical school debt.

 

How to Reduce Medical School Debt

 

 

Make a Budget

The average income for first-year medical residents is about $55,000, according to a recent report. That money may not go very far with your loan payments and other living expenses. It’s crucial to set your budget and stick to it. Many medical professionals suggest living with roommates, carpooling, using public transit, and setting a budget to keep other spending at a minimum.

 

 

Look Into Your Benefits

If you’re starting off pretty frugal until you get accustomed to your new budget, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t think about saving for the future. When it comes to saving for retirement, the sooner the better. Employer matches and retirement programs should be on your list of things to do early in your residency. Take advantage of match money for retirement if your employer offers it. Match money from your employer is free money! Don’t miss out on that opportunity, and check out the rest of your benefits while you’re at it. There are usually several perks and programs you can look into that might help make your transition to residency more comfortable.

 

Set Up Housing

Speaking of housing arrangements, there is conflicting advice on whether or not it makes sense to buy a home vs. renting while in residency. Since most residents spend long hours working and don’t have time for household maintenance or upkeep, buying a home can be a difficult choice. Plus knowing that you might not choose to live in the same place long term cause many experts to advise renting. Look at your unique situation and make sure you’re weighing all of these factors when you decide what to do for housing.

 

As far as finding somewhere to live, location will probably be top of your list. After working long hours and several days in a row, having a long commute is the last thing you want. If the area near your work is not cost-effective, look for ways to get connected with a good roommate or two. Research the area before you relocate and stick to your budget for housing costs so that you don’t end up being rent-poor or house-poor.

 

Practice Self-Care and Routine

Residency can be engrossing. You’re so involved in your work role and in living the life of a busy resident, that it’s not uncommon to let self-care fall by the wayside. Remember, you can’t care for others if you haven’t cared for yourself. Make sure you’re doing what you can to stick to healthy habits, even if there are days you’re low on sleep or not making the best food choices. Getting rest on your time off, enjoying your hobbies even in small doses, and exercising or meal planning can help make sure you’re cared for even with a busy schedule.

 

Enjoy your new life adventure!

 

Ways to Save on Student Loan Debt During Residency

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

Don’t Put Out the F.I.R.E with a Lifestyle Creep

Unless you’re on a desert island somewhere, it’s likely you’ve heard of the F.I.R.E movement. If you haven’t Gilligan, the F.I.R.E movement stands for “Financial Independence, Retire Early.” Basically, it’s a movement started in which many finance savvy people increase their savings in hopes of retiring early and living their best life. Sounds great right? It may sound great but there are really only two ways to participate in F.I.R.E and that is increasing your income level or increasing your savings. So, how does the Financial Independence Retire Early movement relate to lifestyle creep?

What is Lifestyle Creep?

Lifestyle creep might be a term you haven’t heard before, but you’ve probably experienced it or witnessed it. As your discretionary income goes up, your lifestyle becomes more expensive. It’s that train of thought that can really get you in trouble with your bank account. You know the thought, the good ole “I worked really hard this week I deserve a new purse.” That is where lifestyle creep really starts.

 

If you suffer from lifestyle creep you’ve probably also thought of things like. If you can afford a better car, why not drive a better car? If you can afford an apartment without roommates, why have roommates? So, what’s wrong with these thoughts, because if you can afford it, then you should do it, right?

 

Lifestyle Creep and Financial Independence Retire Early Movement

It’s a really delicate balance when income goes up and you feel entitled to nicer things. Suddenly the ability to afford something makes your current situation or current belongings seem like they are not enough, whereas they were just fine yesterday. This is a nightmare for most people involved in the F.I.R.E Movement. So when does it make sense to increase your budget based on higher income and when should you hold off? Here are some things to keep in mind that will keep you away from lifestyle creep and keeping you in the race of Financially Independent Retire Early movement.

 

Always “pay yourself” first.

To pay yourself means to invest in yourself—specifically, your future self (oh hey, F.I.R.E). Increase your contributions to your retirement when your income increases. If you get a raise every year, set a reminder or put your retirement contribution on autopilot to also increase by 1% (or whatever amount works for you). If aiming to be in the F.I.R.E movement you may want to contribute over 1%. This is how people end up “maxing out” retirement contributions, without ever feeling like they are taking a hit in the present to save up for the future. Just ask anyone who’s ever done so. They’ll tell you it may have been the hardest thing they have ever done at the time, but their future self was really grateful!

 

Look at the big picture.

If you get a job offer and will suddenly make 40% more, but your commute will be long, does it make sense to move closer to work if your residence will also cost more? That depends on the big picture. Maybe the amount of time you’ll lose to commuting is worth more than the higher rent or mortgage? Maybe, you will be able to get a house in a better school district, which fits with your long-term plans?  If the commute is farther with a lower mortgage, and you can pay down debt or increase your savings. You need to run the numbers. Check out our below examples of two different scenarios that we estimated. Please note that these are estimated costs.

 

Scenario #1

For example, let’s say that you work in Manhattan, New York…

You currently live in Blairstown, NJ and live rent-free thanks to Mom and Dad.

Your commute to NY takes 4 hours by bus and costs about $400 a month.

If you pay $400 x 12 months = $4,800 a year spent on commuting

In 2019 there are about 250 Business days (excluding public holidays and weekends)

250 business days x 4 hours = 1,000 hours a year you spend commuting.

 

Scenario #2

Let’s say that you move to Hoboken and have a roommate.

You pay $1,000 a month on rent.

Your commute is about 1 hour a day.

Let’s say it costs about $150 a month to commute.

$1,000 a month x 12 months = $12,000 a year on rent

$150 x 12months = $1,800 a year on commuting costs

$12,000 year rent + $1,800 year commuting = $13,800 a year on commuting and housing

1 hour x 250 business days = 250 hours a year spent commuting

 

Now, this example really gives insight into that big picture. Yes, it costs more to live in Hoboken and you have a roommate, but look at that time saved! If your time is of high value to you, Scenario #2 is likely the best choice for you. If you are participating in F.I.R.E and want to save money or pay down debt as much as possible, Scenario #1 is likely the right choice for you. Regardless, which option is personally best for you, understand these are the types of numbers to run when looking to make big decisions.

 

Do I need this or do I just want it? The treat yo’ self trap.

Let’s say your discretionary income goes up, should you get that household repair or a non-urgent medical procedure? By all means, this is not an example of lifestyle creep and you should use your higher income to make it happen. Now, if you find yourself flush with cash and jealous of your neighbor’s new car, you should pause.  If you believe that you have worked hard enough to deserve a big trip. Planning a vacation just because you can, is an example of lifestyle creep. We aren’t saying you don’t deserve a vacation, but that vacation should be planned on a responsible budget.

 

When making any purchasing decisions ask yourself, “Are these wants more important than other needs?” We’d recommend thinking long-term when it comes to making purchasing decisions. What’s more responsible, paying off debt and continue reaping the reward of not having high payments or added interest or making a purchase like a car that you don’t “need”? Maybe there is a compromise like paying off your current car and setting a goal to upgrade next year, or maybe you can plan a trip for next year and save for it while you are concurrently paying down debt.

 

It’s dangerous to deserve better. We are constantly bombarded with flashy advertising, slick marketing, and more choices than ever before. It can be really easy to think that you deserve something better, but in reality, is that new item really going to bring you long term happiness and security? Many participating in the F.I.R.E movement will say items are just items and that real happiness comes from relationships and memories.

 

The F.I.R.E mindset can get even tougher when many of us have had parents who treated us like the most special people ever who gave us what we wanted. That’s not a bad thing until you start making decisions based on what you think you deserve, instead of what you can practically achieve. Thanks, Mom and Dad, but I don’t mind having roommates for another year, or it’s not a big deal to keep driving a car that’s older but works fine.

 

Check those budget boxes.

If your discretionary income has gone up either because you got a raise or other costs went down, you need to do some budgeting. Typical steps that personal finance experts advise working on include getting up-to-date on all of your bills if you aren’t already. Second, have a $1,000 emergency fund. Lastly, experts advise people to focus on high-interest debts before building a savings account with 3–6 months of expenses in it. Then look into things like investing, saving for your children’s college or paying off your house!

 

Achieving a higher income is great! It’s a wonderful feeling when you see your hard work paying off and making life easier. Don’t end up being someone who makes more than enough to live comfortably but you’re still living paycheck to paycheck. Lifestyle creep is so important to recognize and avoid. Keep your financial goals in order and continue to work towards them. Whether your goal is to be Financially Independent and Retire Early or to pay off your debt, you got this!

 

Click for Cards and Accounts That Pay You

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

How To Lose Weight On A Budget Starting Today

It’s that time of year when we’re all reflecting on who we are and how far we’ve come in the last year. Some people hate on resolutions because they are so often temporary, but there’s nothing stupid about trying to make positive changes in your life! Two of the most common changes are losing weight and saving money. Why not do both? Here are some of our tips on how to lose weight on a budget.

 

Have you penciled yourself in?

Put yourself on the calendar and stick to it. It’s easy to skip a workout when you already scheduled a meeting or made other plans. Making YOU part of your routine means that self-care becomes a habit. It can even be something you look forward to liking spin class or joining a workout group? Try working out with friends as it will help to hold you accountable.

 

How much does success cost?

Things like a celebratory meal, your weekly social brunch, or getting a gym membership cost money. That doesn’t mean you can’t budget for them. Just set a goal for how much to spend on those meals out. Make sure you track those little extras and cut yourself off when you’ve reached your monthly limit. If you’re faced with an important celebration, see where you can cut something else to keep your budget balanced.

 

If you want to put a gym membership into your budget, look for places like community centers and colleges. They will often sell much cheaper memberships that are just as good as what you’d use as a more expensive fitness club. If you live in a household with multiple people, try looking into fitness family plans. Fitness family plans can come in especially helpful when you have little ones. Facilities will usually offer discounted classes and free daycare for your kids.

 

There are sneaky calories on every menu.

Buying lunch every day at work can be a real drain to your wallet, and you’re less likely to get a balanced meal within your calorie budget. An average meal out contains upwards of 1,400 calories and can cost Use a little time on the weekend to cook and plan ahead. Keep a few healthy snacks in a drawer at work so that you’re not tempted to hit up the vending machine. You’ll save money, never get hangry, and stay on track for weight loss or maintenance.

 

If you’re going out for a special occasion or just plain didn’t manage to get together a meal to bring to work, look up the restaurant menu ahead of time. Make a decision on what to eat when you’re not hungry! That way, you won’t be tempted into getting a gigantic double-bacon burger bomb. Most places have their menu on their website, but you can also check somewhere like

 

We’re a generation of Googlers—use it!

Thanks to the wonders of the internet, there are so many free resources for fitness. From to blogs with the best bodyweight exercises, free exercise plans are everywhere. You don’t need a fancy gym to get in shape, but you do have to be motivated. If you’re on your phone regularly anyway, follow some of your fave fitness Instagram accounts like Ebonny Fowler (@funwithfit) or Marie Purvis (@MariePurvis) to get simple, effective workouts delivered right to your IG feed. Or look for other fitness gurus who focus on how to stay fit without having to sell you something.

 

Make savvy substitutions.

If you know that a big slice of pie (pizza or otherwise) is your weakness, look for ways to enjoy your favorite foods without tanking your calorie budget or emptying your wallet. For instance, you can make inexpensive pita pizzas at home using whole wheat pitas, low-sugar sauce, and all your fave fresh veggies and herbs. If you eat mindlessly in front of the TV while you watch season 4 of The Office for the 200th time, pop some light popcorn to crunch instead of sitting down with a bag of greasy chips.

 

How Hydrated are You?

Staying hydrated can help make you feel less hungry on top of promoting healthy digestion and ample energy levels. You don’t even need a fancy water bottle. Just make sure you’re regularly drinking a glass of water and you’ll reap the benefits.

 

Mom was right about fresh air.

Nobody says you have to become a bodybuilder to lose weight. Going outside to walk or ride your bike can be a great way to keep your weight in check, get the mental health boost, and feel connected to your community. Even better: find someone to go with you! Don’t forget about the benefits of biking or walking to work. Saving money on transportation while getting your heart rate up is an incredible way to tighten your budget and burn some calories. Plus, it’s worked right into your routine, so it won’t feel like exercise.

 

Be kind to yourself and have patience.

Thankfully we millennials are pretty good about self-care. We’re the first generation to really spotlight mental wellness as a really important part of your overall health. Mental wellness can suffer when you decide that you need a big change and try to overhaul all of your habits at once. Have some patience and realize that it’s not easy to change overnight. You’re still going to have some slip-ups, and you’re not going to experience a #TransformationTuesday overnight. Sure, physical health and financial health are important, but so is mental health. Make sure you’re not setting unrealistic expectations, and be sure to take rest days even when you’re hitting things hard at the gym.

 

If losing weight is only part of your goal and you really want to look at how to save money, check out our student loan refinancing options. You can call us any time to talk to a specialist and see how we can help!

 

5 Financial Mistakes to Avoid in Your 20s

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

Don’t Wait for Graduation to Pay Down Student Loan Debt

What does a currently enrolled graduate student, a recent graduate, or a Doctorate student all have in common? The answer is simple, student loans. Sounds like a bad joke, but student debt in the United States is no joking matter. The current student loan debt total has hit $1.5 trillion as of 2018 according to Federal Reserve data. If you find yourself a borrower of student loan debt, know that debt doesn’t just start after graduation. The moment your loan is approved you become a borrower and therefore take on the responsibility to pay down that debt. As a borrower, here are some ways to be financially responsible and pay down debt quickly ensuring yourself a brighter financial future.

 

Don’t Go Overboard

 

According to CollegeBoard the average full-time bachelor degree seeking student, who attends a four year school will pay somewhere in the range of $21,370 to $48,510 per year in 2018 – 2019.  Now the average Master’s seeking student will pay about $19,080. These estimates do include the cost of room and board and will differ depending on if the student is attending an out of state school or an in-state school.

 

When the time comes to apply for your loans, be sure you have a budget! We cannot stress this point enough you need a financial plan before you make the decision to apply for student loans. Know what you’ll need to borrow money for. Think about tuition costs, housing, meals, book costs, personal costs, and transportation costs. Only borrow what you absolutely need for school.

 

The Countdown

 

Don’t be the student who has the countdown until graduation. You know, the one using the grace period to look for their future career and move back in with their parents. Now there’s nothing wrong with moving back in with the parents to save a few bucks, in fact, we would encourage it. What we mean is instead of waiting until the clock starts at the end of your grace period start paying down debt on day one! The sooner you can start throwing money at your student loans, the better off your future self will be.

 

Now it doesn’t have to be an astronomical amount of money. Even the smallest contribution towards your debt will help you in the long run. Let’s say that instead of going out to brunch with your friends on the weekend you decide to make it. Let’s say you usually buy an egg and cheese, on a bagel with a coffee for about $10 for simplicity. That $10 a week can turn up to $40 a month.

 

Say you took out $30,000 in student loan debt. If you completed a $40 payment every month while you’re in school, you would save $2,515 from the total of your loan. Yes, you can drop almost $3,000 off your loan by simply making a $40 a month payment. Small sacrifices make all the difference in paying down your student loans before graduation.

 

It’s No Vacation

College in the past was seen as an experience but it is not any longer. Don’t treat your education like a vacation with a limitless budget. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the annual American household cost for eating out is $3,000. Even if it’s only one person, that would count as a household. Broken down that would be $250 a month the average household spends eating out! Before you start spending money on food remember that’s money that could go towards your student loan debt. We all have to eat to live, but is eating out necessary? Try using that meal plan or doing weekly grocery shopping and meal prep.

 

Stay in Budget

Someone once said “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should” that could not be truer here. Though you may have money for streaming services like a Spotify Premium® membership or Netflix® – doesn’t mean you should have it. In addition to cutting down on eating out, you could lose that Netflix® account. About nine out of ten college students use Netflix® according to Daily to Reader. If you’re living on campus you’re provided with free cable. Yes, the keyword being “FREE” – drop the subscription services and put them towards student loan debt. No, you won’t be able to watch the latest series of Stranger Things on your own, but I’m sure your friend or their friend has Netflix®. The Basic plan on Netflix® as of 10/2018 is $7.99 a month. Let’s take your savings from cutting back on eating out including our previous example- $100 and savings from losing that Netflix® subscription $7.99 that equates to 107.99 a month towards student loan debt. When you pay $107.99 every month towards your loan it is a savings of $7,083.71 from the total loan amount.

 

They’re Called Doctors

 

If you’ve ever seen the movie Tommy Boy you’ll get the reference. If not, you can watch the clip online. Going to school for seven years is for doctors, not the average student seeking a bachelor degree. All jokes aside, you need to do your best to graduate on time. Staying in school longer means more debt and that means more money you’ll need to pay off in the long run.

 

In recent years there has been a trend of typical 4-year degrees taking 6 years to achieve. Students who take longer to graduate are spending 50% more than participated for their degrees according to Student Debt Relief. One major tip (no pun intended) know what you want to major in before starting. It’s okay to change your major but work closely with counselors take summer classes. Do your best to stay on track for your estimated graduation date.

 

Evaluate Loans

Yes, you finally graduated! Don’t be fooled the work doesn’t stop. To continue being a financially responsible borrower you’ll need to evaluate the types of loans that you have. Do you have federal or private loans? The type of loans that you have will have major implications on the options that you available to you moving forward.  Pay attention to your interest rates and knowledgeable regarding repayment types.

 

Be wise; if you are within that 6 month grace period, continue to make those payments because we know that they will pay for themselves and then some. Create a long-term plan to pay down your debt. Use your income to create the long-term plan and stick with your budget. There are so many resources available at your fingertips to research things like loan consolidation, student loan refinancing, student loan forgiveness, and deferment and forbearance.

 

Your responsibility for staying a responsible borrower is to continue those healthy spending habits that you created for yourself in college. In addition you should look to further your education. Do you want to get a Master’s Degree? Use reliable sources and stick to a budget and long-term plan. Education is so no joke. Whether you’re the currently enrolled graduate student, a recent graduate or a Doctorate student debt doesn’t have to weight you down forever.

 

Learn More About Grace Periods

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.