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Cards and Accounts That Pay You

Unless you’re hardcore off the grid and don’t need a credit score or credit history (not advised), you’re going to need bank accounts and at least one credit card. If you need them anyway, why not find the accounts that pay you back? There are tons of promotions for cards and accounts that will give you perks for signing up. It’s up to you to determine what account fits your needs, but these are the main types of offers we’ve seen.

 

Cards with Cash Back

Some people swear by cards that give them cash back. Cashback rewards tend to work best for people who use their credit card for all or most purchases and then pay it off in full each month. A quick tip is to pay the balance off before the interest accrues each month. If you choose not to pay off the balance each month you could actually be spending that money. Basically, what you pay in interest is going to reduce or even negate your reward. The average individual will not pay off their card’s balance each month this is how it makes sense for the credit card company to offer the reward. If you’re smart about it and don’t charge more than you can pay off each month, you’ll reap the reward.

 

There are multiple options for receiving cash back rewards. How you cash back will be applied will be dependent on what your credit card provider allows. Some cards will allow you to redeem your cash back for gift cards, paper checks, direct deposits, or even putting the cash back you earned back to your credit card balance.

 

If you believe that this type of card is best for you, understand the redemption threshold. Cash back credit cards often have a minimum redemption threshold. A minimum redemption is the amount of rewards that you must achieve before cashing in your cash back rewards. These redemption minimums can often be associated with reward credit cards as well.

 

Cards with Rewards

If rewards like frequent flier miles or points you can redeem for travel expenses are more your speed, check out cards with other types of rewards. Look at the conversion from dollars to points to what your points can be redeemed for. If you have to spend $10,000 for a $100 gift card, then that probably isn’t enough of a reward for you to care. But if you fly often for work or find a card that has good travel rewards and you can pay it off each month, this might be a nice way to add to your travel nest egg or get a good discount on a few trips each year.

 

How the rewards are calculated will be determined based on the credit card that you select and get approved for. Some reward cards will provide the same rewards rate per purchase regardless of balance. Another type is similar to a tiered cash-back credit card. Each purchase you make will fall into a category. Some categories offer a larger return than other categories.

 

A quick word of caution before signing up for a card like this is to know the type of borrower you are. If you typically do not pay your credit cards on time, have a balance, or budgeting is not your strong suit this is probably not the right credit card for you.

 

 

Cash Rewards on Bank Accounts

Bank accounts often offer cash rewards for signing on or setting up an account. You may often times see at your local community bank a large sign in the window with an amount on it for new customers who open up an account. This sign-on bonus is by far the most common type of cash back for a bank account. When considering opening up an account to get the sign-on bonus there may be conditions you have to meet. The small print and terms are so important when opening up any type of account. When opening an account, you have to make a pretty substantial initial deposit, and you might have to maintain it for a period of time as well in order to keep the sign-on bonus. You don’t want to count on a reward and then find out that it requires you to deposit $20,000 if you don’t have that much money.

 

Conditions can include a number of direct deposits or purchases you have to make within a certain period to qualify. This type of offer is fairly common when looking into high-yield checking or savings accounts. You’ll typically be required to have a specified number of transactions per month and have to have a direct deposit. If you’ve read all the terms and small print and feel the account is the right choice you should move forward.

 

Other Things to Consider

 

Know the Interest

If you are looking at a card for the rewards and it has a much higher interest rate than others, this should weigh into your decision. Even if you plan to pay the card off each month, you don’t want to end up using it in an emergency and struggle to make payments with interest later. If you already have other credit cards, have a plan for which card should be used where and how you’re going to pay them.

 

Look at Annual Fees

Some reward and cash-back cards have a pretty hefty annual fee. Don’t sign up for a card until you know what the annual fee is. Make sure if there is a fee, that it makes sense for how you intend to use the card. If saving money is the name of the game for you, look for a card with no annual fee.

 

Know the Requirements

Requirements for different types of accounts vary wildly. There could be a minimum deposit, amount, number of purchases, or balance. Many companies utilize different types of requirements that you may have to meet to get rewarded. Keep an eye out for those requirements and see if you qualify. If it doesn’t match your situation, don’t do it.

 

Check the Terms and Conditions

Always read the fine print and make sure you understand it. This rule should be applied t anything and everything. Make sure you’re reading any documentation fully and that you understand. Reading the terms and conditions will help to prevent any surprises. If there’s something you’re not sure of, read further or talk to customer service for more information. You always want to be sure that you know what you’re getting into before you sign up so that you don’t end up in a bad situation.

 

 

Check Out These Common Credit Card Myths

The Basics of Credit Cards and Credit Card Debt

Updated December 4, 2019

Credit cards are an important component of building a strong credit history. Having a strong credit history will enable you to get future loans, such as a home mortgage and can lead to improved rates. Your credit history is also essential for other things, like getting an apartment or opening a cell phone plan. Credit cards — if used properly — can be effective in helping you to create a credit history in order to reach your financial goals, including becoming a homeowner.

 

According to Magnify Money, Americans paid banks $113 billion in credit card interest in 2018, up 12% from the $101 billion in interest paid in 2017. Because of this rising category of debt, it is important that you understand the basics of credit cards, how they are meant to be used, and a few tips on how you can get the most out of having them – without falling into debt.

 

What is a Credit Card?

A credit card looks just like a debit card, but instead of taking money out of your account when you make a purchase, it borrows money from your bank. Most credit institutions will give users a twenty-five to thirty day grace period with which to pay back the money they borrowed. If you do not pay the amount back within the allotted time, the bank will add interest to the remaining balance. The amount of interest added will be determined by your credit card’s interest rate and the amount of money that you owe for the remainder of the grace period.

 

Have a Repayment Plan

Users must be careful when making purchases with a credit card. It can be tempting to make a large purchase with a credit card and push the payment off until later. Forbes magazine says, “Credit cards are like DVRs for money,” because like a DVR, a credit card allows you pay now, and then pay it back later. This philosophy is what can lead to bad spending habits. So make sure that you have a plan before you make a purchase on your credit card. Look at your budget, and make sure that you allocate money for the use of paying off your credit card. Credit cards should be used as an extension of your financial accounts, NOT as a supplementary form of income. Making sure that you don’t spend more on your credit cards than you can pay back will ensure that you won’t find yourself in financial trouble.

 

Recommended Usage

Having a credit card is a great way to boost your credit and establish a good credit history. However, if misused, it can have a negative impact on your credit score. According to a recent survey from NerdWallet, most credit card users are unaware of the effects that many common actions have on their credit scores. In the financial industry, there are various opinions about how to best use a credit card. What experts can agree on, however, is that there are several important things you can do to ensure that you stay in good standing with your credit provider.

  1. The first things are to make sure that you never miss a payment. Whether you are paying a large lump sum or making a minimum payment — the minimum you can pay to stay in good standing — you must make sure to always pay on time. A missed payment could result in a reduced credit score.
  2. Another great practice is to keep your balance at or below 35 percent of your credit limit. This is the optimal amount for a healthy credit score, says Lucy Duni of Truecredit.com.

Owning and using a credit card does not have to be a bad thing, and it certainly does not mean that you are going to develop bad spending habits. If you follow these suggestions and make wise purchases, your credit history will be strong, and you will reap the rewards of being in good financial standing.

 

Check Out These Credit Card Myths

 

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