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Medical Match Day Finance Tips

Congratulations you’ve worked hard been through multiple interviews and finally, your hard work has paid off! You’ve been matched and you’re getting ready for residency. It’s so exciting to jump into residency and see what having this career will really be like. You’ll have the ability to learn from experienced professionals in your field of interest. Getting yourself prepared for your residency can feel stressful, but it doesn’t need to be. Here are some financial tips to help you get settled and make good choices for your future.

 

Set Up Loan Payments

Once you are done with school, you should start paying on student loans. Residency can take several years to complete. It’s likely that your residency isn’t paying you what a full-time position in your career will so all the medical school debt that’s accumulated, can be difficult to sort through. If you find yourself with a large amount of federal student loan debt, look into income-based repayment plans. We would recommend this as a temporary solution until you’ve completed your residency program.  This will assure that you’re making student loan payments towards your medical school debt, but that those payments are not impossible to complete. You may eventually qualify for public loan forgiveness on your federal student loans. If you qualify to get on an IBR plan in residency after completing the program you may only have a few years remaining.

 

 

If you also have private student loans there is no need to worry. Most private student loan lenders will work with you to offer some type of payment plan. You may want to consider refinancing your medical student loan debt. In order to qualify for student loan refinancing, you may need to add a cosigner due to income you’ll be making in your residency. Regardless of which route you chose, in the first few months after graduation, you’ll want to have your payment plan set up. Don’t let this task fall off your radar—in-school deferment ends shortly after graduation for most kinds of medical school debt.

 

How to Reduce Medical School Debt

 

 

Make a Budget

The average income for first-year medical residents is about $55,000, according to a recent report. That money may not go very far with your loan payments and other living expenses. It’s crucial to set your budget and stick to it. Many medical professionals suggest living with roommates, carpooling, using public transit, and setting a budget to keep other spending at a minimum.

 

 

Look Into Your Benefits

If you’re starting off pretty frugal until you get accustomed to your new budget, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t think about saving for the future. When it comes to saving for retirement, the sooner the better. Employer matches and retirement programs should be on your list of things to do early in your residency. Take advantage of match money for retirement if your employer offers it. Match money from your employer is free money! Don’t miss out on that opportunity, and check out the rest of your benefits while you’re at it. There are usually several perks and programs you can look into that might help make your transition to residency more comfortable.

 

Set Up Housing

Speaking of housing arrangements, there is conflicting advice on whether or not it makes sense to buy a home vs. renting while in residency. Since most residents spend long hours working and don’t have time for household maintenance or upkeep, buying a home can be a difficult choice. Plus knowing that you might not choose to live in the same place long term cause many experts to advise renting. Look at your unique situation and make sure you’re weighing all of these factors when you decide what to do for housing.

 

As far as finding somewhere to live, location will probably be top of your list. After working long hours and several days in a row, having a long commute is the last thing you want. If the area near your work is not cost-effective, look for ways to get connected with a good roommate or two. Research the area before you relocate and stick to your budget for housing costs so that you don’t end up being rent-poor or house-poor.

 

Practice Self-Care and Routine

Residency can be engrossing. You’re so involved in your work role and in living the life of a busy resident, that it’s not uncommon to let self-care fall by the wayside. Remember, you can’t care for others if you haven’t cared for yourself. Make sure you’re doing what you can to stick to healthy habits, even if there are days you’re low on sleep or not making the best food choices. Getting rest on your time off, enjoying your hobbies even in small doses, and exercising or meal planning can help make sure you’re cared for even with a busy schedule.

 

Enjoy your new life adventure!

 

Ways to Save on Student Loan Debt During Residency

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

Student Loan Refinancing: How To Avoid Predatory Lending

No one wants to get scammed, but it can be hard to feel confident about whether you’re working with a reputable source or not. In an era when we have access to so many different options and there are countless financial entities available at our fingertips, there are definitely some things to keep in mind so that you don’t end up getting a raw deal.  It’s not uncommon if you’re interested in student loan refinancing, or have been approached by a company to want to see if they’re legit before you move forward. Here are some tips on how to avoid being a victim of predatory lending.

 

Check your sources.

It’s not uncommon to find random financing offers around the internet. Maybe you read about it on Reddit, saw a social media post, or even direct mail. Companies regularly send postcards and mailers to try to get your attention. The marketing material can look pretty convincing, too! Don’t let a slick landing page or a nice mailer fool you. You generally want to find suggestions from sources you trust, like a financial expert, or trusted online sources. A good resource would be the Better Business Bureau. You can see online complaints, information about the company, and all provided by an unbiased source. A second site that provides unbiased online reviews is Trustpilot. Websites with unbiased reviews and legitimate accreditation or backing can be an ideal source to verify credibility.

 

Never trust dishonest marketing.

It may sound extreme, but we’ve heard of examples where someone was approached by an entity that attempted to look like the government. These scare tactics are used frequently enough by scammy companies for one reason – they work. These companies use this scare tactic because when you think the government is trying to get in touch and you’re in trouble, you answer! These options work similarly to the IRS scams that are always happening with the IRS calling your phone, but in reality, the IRS doesn’t actually call anyone. If the company tried to look like a government program and later you find out they’re not, drop them. A legitimate company won’t send fake notices or use a misleading URL in order to get your business.

 

Listen to the old adage.

If it’s too good to be true, it probably is. There’s a reason that this simple advice is so often passed down. Really amazing offers are rare. If something sounds like there’s no way they could offer you such incredible terms or that great of a deal, there is likely fine print that’s missing. Fact check the offer and look for comparable data. Your alarm bells should go off if you’re looking at a company whose reputation is dubious. This especially proves true if they’re claiming to get you unheard of service or savings.

 

Requirements to Refinance Student Loans

 

What do I owe you?

There are lots of scams across all kinds of industries. One of the most common is when a person tries to get you to pay something up front with the promise of services to come. Lending is no different. If you have to pay a fee or anything before you can see the offer, chances are that this is a scam. Companies often will offer to facilitate student loan discharge for someone with a permanent disability. The process of applying for student loan discharge if you have a qualifying disability is free. Any company offering to do it for a hefty up-front fee is scamming you!

 

Avoid anyone who is too aggressive.

Sometimes a company will aggressively pursue potential borrowers and push them to select a consolidation option that’s not in the borrower’s best financial interest. They might be a legitimate company but will leave out crucial details in order to sign you up. A good general rule of thumb is to be aware of the interest rate and terms. Understand how a lower payment can extend the life of your loans, thus increasing the overall amount due. Always get all the details, so you know the financial implications of your decision.

 

Give it a gut check.

Sometimes your intuition is your best tool. If something doesn’t feel right, don’t be afraid to hit pause until you can find more information. Be wary of any company that’s asking for too much personal information before you are sure that they’re legit. Keep an eye out for things that just don’t seem right, like misspellings or a digital presence that seems fishy. You should never be faulted or made to feel bad for giving yourself time to look into the details and read everything over. If you feel like you’re being hurried through or your questions aren’t being answered stop and take a breather to do a gut check. All of your concerns should be addressed with ample information so that you feel confident about the process and decision. If that’s not what you’re experiencing, you should back away.

 

Use your village.

There are lots of reputable companies out there, and it’s pretty easy to find them by reading unbiased reviews. Do your research and continue learning more about how their process will help you. Use resources available to you to vet companies before you reach out. If you utilize the resources available to you, you’ll be less likely to encounter an unreputable company on the prowl.

You should never be badgered or threatened.

No reputable company is going to make threats against you or repeatedly harass you to sign up. As a consumer, you have certain protections and any company that violates these should be investigated. If you’re facing this treatment from any lender, would like to see more information on various types of financial products and your rights, visit the FDIC website.

 

 

Check Out Our Guide to Student Loan Refinancing

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Marriage and Student Loan Debt

Ever been on a date where the other person doesn’t stop talking about their ex? If you’ve had this experience, you can likely relate it to discussing your student loan debt in your relationship. Talking about finances is a necessary evil in a marriage. It can be difficult to discuss finances in a marriage because many people handle finances different based on their personal experiences and how their parents handled them. You might be great at adulting, but if your parents were never open about managing money, you’re probably unsure of how to bring it up. You might even be unsure as to where to start when it comes to managing finances together. Student loans are a big part of many couples’ financial reality. Figuring out how marriage will affect your student loans is an important part of managing your money together.  Here are some main points that we think you should know about marriage and student loan debt.

 

Honesty

The fastest way to create a rift and cause problems in your relationship is to hide information about your finances. According to CreditCards.com, 6% of Americans in a relationship have hidden credit cards or checking/savings accounts from their partner. That total adds up to about 7 million, for perspective, that’s the size of the state of Massachusetts.  It’s not uncommon especially in younger people ages 18-29 to withhold some financial information. It’s when a partner begins to lie about large purchases that a partner should become concerned.

 

People might think that love solves everything, but it’s better to be on the same page and realistic about the situation. If you are mature enough to get married and really want to work together to succeed, you need to face your finances.  As a couple, you need to get over any fears about assessing the financial situation and air everything out. It doesn’t have to be painful but it needs to be an honest outlook. For some couples, this can seem really overwhelming but it doesn’t have to be.

 

Get Tips on How to Talk Finances With Your Partner

 

Get a Plan

Have a conversation about how to best review everything. Discuss each of your finances and then surmise a plan to tackle them. Now in some cases, it may not be this simple depending on your income level, occupation, and level of debt. You may want to meet with a financial counselor first and go over everything together, or sit down as a couple at home and discuss the basics before moving any further. It’s totally up to you both, as a team.

 

Don’t be shy or embarrassed by your financial situation as a couple. There are people who make a living on making sure couples are financially confident and ready to tackle financial goals together. Don’t overlook this benefit of consulting with an outside source about finances—especially if you feel like you don’t know what you’re doing. If you can’t afford an outside counselor check online, you may be surprised at the educational resources available for free. When it comes to self-learning about finances just be careful how you select your resources. As the old saying goes not everything you see online is true!

 

Loan Responsibility

When the person you’ve chosen to marry has student loan debt you can face some challenges. If you haven’t co-signed for a spouse and it’s just their name on the loan, this won’t be something that shows up on your credit report. Beware that even if you did not co-sign your partner’s loan there are instances when you might be responsible for paying the loan. Student loans aren’t that different from other types of loans.

 

For example, if someone passes away, the rest of their loan will likely be forgiven and the spouse would not have to continue making those payments. There are some cases where death will not discharge the remaining debt and the loan company may contact the estate for payment. If your spouse ever lost their income and went into default, the loan companies will look for someone to pay. If your spouse doesn’t have an income, your wages could be garnished. It’s a pretty extreme scenario, but it also happens and is something you should be aware of.

 

If you are choosing to marry someone with student loan debt, it’s important to talk about this. You’ll want to have a plan set up for each of these scenarios. Though they are extreme if you have savings and you pay down your debt responsibly you shouldn’t have any problems.

 

Repayment Plan Adjustments

IBR and other types of repayment plans are often used when paying back student loans. We would caution against using these programs. In some cases, your monthly student loan payment may not be covering the interest accrued that month and therefore your balance will continue to increase.

 

Repayment plans can be based on your household income and family size. When you get married your income and family size may change. If your spouse makes a considerable amount of money, your minimum payments could go up even with your family size going up. If your spouse makes less than you or is not working, your loan payment could go down. It all depends on the details of your financial situation and your loan servicer, but it’s worth noting that this is a possibility.

 

Refinancing

Fairly often we receive request to refinance couple’s student debt together. Many see this as creating a lot less hassle for themselves by creating only one bill.  That’s not always possible, and many experts suggest keeping your loans separate in case your relationship status or financial situation changes in the future. You are not always able to refinance together, either.  Whether or not you can refinance your student loan with your spouse will depend on the loan type and servicer you have. If you’re looking into refinancing, talk to each other about goals. Do you want a lower payment so you can save for a house or do you want to pay loans off sooner so you can live abroad or go to grad school? Again, it’s up to the two of you, but you can’t be on the same page if you don’t talk about it.

 

Don’t stress.

Take a deep breath and know that it’s normal for people to get stressed out talking about money, but it doesn’t have to be that way. No matter how much money you make, you will have to work together as a team to set priorities. This isn’t a blame game. Just talking about finances doesn’t mean that you’re secretly harboring any resentment or grudges. No one is being attacked and no questions are stupid. You both have to agree to create an open dialogue where you both feel good about discussing money and plans. Know that sometimes there are compromises, or one of you might change your personal plans to advance the other. That’s what it means to be a team.

 

Tips for Finding the Perfect Lender to Refinance Your Student Loans

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Glossary of Student Loan Refinancing Terms

There are so many terms that borrower’s encounter in the student loan application process, most borrowers may not be exactly sure what each means. If you’re getting ready to apply or just want to know what the documents are talking about, here’s our glossary of common student loan terms that you should know.

 

Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) and Gross Income

Gross income is the total income you earn in a year before deductions for federal or state taxes, credits, and so on. Adjusted gross income is the income you earn in a year which is eligible to be taxed after accounting for deductions. AGI is usually lower than your gross income and is what many institutions use to determine if you can get perks like loan tax benefits or financial aid, grants, etc. The easiest place to find these are on your official tax return.

 

Adverse Action Letter

When you apply for credit, insurance, a loan, or sometimes even employment, and are denied due to something negative on your credit report, the organization inquiring might be required to send you one of these. It explains why you were turned down and it’s important because it gives you a reason to see if something is wrong on your credit report.

 

Amortization

This term describes how the principal is paid over the course of a loan.  Most student loans are fully amortized, meaning that if all payments are made as scheduled over the life of the loan the principal balance will be fully repaid at the maturity date.  Other types of loans, including some types of mortgage loans, have a feature known as a balloon payment.  With a balloon payment, regularly scheduled payments do not fully repay the principal amount borrowed, so when the loan matures the final payment contains a larger, or balloon, payment of all remaining principal.

 

Annual Loan Limit

This is the maximum loan amount you can borrow for an academic year. Loan limits can vary by facts like grade level and loan type.

 

Award Letter

If you received financial aid, expect to see an award letter that explains the different types of aid for which you are eligible. The document will also include information about your loans, grants, or scholarships, and you’ll see a new one each year that you’re in school.

 

Borrower

The person who is responsible for paying back a student loan. You may not be the only one responsible, like if you signed with a cosigner, but the loan is for you and your academic fees and tuition. You’re the borrower.

 

Capitalized Interest

When unpaid interest gets added to the principal balance (increasing your overall balance and future interest), this is called capitalization. This is why it’s important to pay interest whenever possible. Capitalization might happen at the end of a grace period or deferment, or after forbearance, depending on whether it’s a federal or private loan. When a loan is consolidated or if it enters default, capitalization may occur.

 

Cosigner

If needed, borrowers can add a second person who shares responsibility for a student loan. This second person co-signs the loan and becomes partially responsible for repayment in the event that the primary borrower is not able to pay.

 

Consolidation Loan

Consolidation is when a new loan replaces your current student loans. People might do this to make payments easier to manage or to reduce the amount you owe each month or in total. There are lots of things to know about consolidation.

 

Default/Delinquent

A loan is considered delinquent when a scheduled payment is not made in a timely manner.  Delinquency can result in the imposition of late charges, collection calls or letters, and negative information being placed on a credit report.  Default is when the lender determines that the borrower has failed to honor the terms of the loan agreement in such a way that the lender is entitled to declare the entire loan balance due and payable, even if the loan has not yet reached its maturity date.  Serious delinquency is very often the reason for a loan being declared in default, but loan agreements typically provide that certain other events can trigger a default.  Before entering into a loan agreement, always read the loan agreement carefully and understand what can constitute a default under that loan.

 

Deferment

Students can usually postpone loan repayment if they meet certain criteria. This might be a pre-set time limit or can be when someone is in school and not able to make payments. Unsubsidized loans accrue interest while being deferred, but subsidized loans do not accrue interest while in deferment.

 

Disbursement

This is when your school receives funds like financial aid money or student loan funds. The institution then applies it to your bill for tuition and school-related fees. If you consolidate, the disbursement happens when money is sent to pay off your old loans.

 

Discharge

When some or all of your student loan debt is canceled, this is called discharge.

 

Entrance/Exit Interview or Counseling

Schools provide entrance or exit counseling to help students understand important financing topics like how to repay loans and stay in good standing with student loans. This can happen during enrollment as an entrance to the process, and after graduation as part of leaving the school system.

 

Expected Family Contribution (EFC)

This amount is an estimate based on how much money you, your spouse, and/or family can contribute to your tuition for the academic year. It’s calculated with information provided on your FAFSA and helps determine your financial need. Financial need is calculated as the cost of attendance minus your EFC. This determines your eligibility for aid including Stafford loans, Perkins loans, scholarships, and grants.

 

Fixed or Variable Interest Rate

If an interest rate cannot change over time, it is fixed. A variable interest rate can change over the life of the loan.  Variable rates can move up or down based upon changes to an identified index, such a prime rate, a particular U.S. Treasury note, or LIBOR.  LIBOR stands for the London Interbank Offered Rate, and is an index commonly used with student loans.  Some variable rate loans may have a “cap” and/or a “floor.”  A cap is the maximum rate that can be applied to the loan, regardless of changes to the index.  A floor is just the opposite – the minimum rate for the loan regardless of changes to the index.

 

Forbearance

Forbearance is when you can postpone or reduce student loan payments, but interest continues to accrue and increase the total amount you owe.

 

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

FAFSA is the application a student must complete to apply for any type of federal student aid including loans, grants, or scholarships.

 

Full-Time/Part-Time Enrollment

Whether you are enrolled or not, and your status as part-time or full-time can affect different aspects of student loan financing and repayment. Part-time is usually six credit hours and full-time is twelve, but this can vary.

 

In-School Deferment

While in actively enrolled in school, you might be able to postpone your federal or private student loan payments until you graduate or drop below half time.

 

Loan Forgiveness

When you qualify for certain programs, you may be able to have the final balance of your loans forgiven after a certain period of time. There are specific criteria for eligibility and usually a detailed application process.

 

Master Promissory Note (MPN)

This document states the terms of repayment for your student loans and is the official document proving your commitment to repay the money you borrowed with interest. To receive federal loans, all borrowers must sign an MPN.

 

Principal Balance

The principal balance is the amount of money borrowed under the loan that you currently owe. It doesn’t include interest or fees that are either unpaid or yet to accrue.

 

Repayment Period

This amount of time is what you have to repay your student loans. Standard for Stafford loans is ten years, but this can be extended with reduced repayment plans. The longer you take to pay your loans, usually, the more you end up paying in interest. A repayment plan is the formal agreement you have with a servicer that details how you plan to repay your loans each month.

 

Repayment Terms

These terms represent all of your rights and responsibilities for the student loan, including what you’ll pay for monthly payments. Lenders are required to disclose repayment terms to you before you can commit to borrowing a loan.

 

Right to Cancel

Once an approved application has been accepted by the borrower, the federal Truth in Lending Act requires the lender to provide a Final Truth in Lending disclosure statement.  This final disclosure statement includes a three business day right to cancel, during which time the borrower can change their mind and cancel the loan.  To protect borrowers, the lender cannot disburse the loan proceeds until the right to cancel period has expired.

Servicer

The loan servicer handles your student loan billing like collecting payments and offering customer service between you and the lender.

 

Student Aid Report (SAR)

The SAR is a detailed list of all of the financial and personal information you submitted for your FAFSA, including financial info for your family. Your school receives a copy of this and you should receive one as well.

 

Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans

While in school and during your grace period, the government pays the interest on your subsidized loans so you don’t have to. Federal loans that are not based on financial need are unsubsidized, meaning you’re responsible for paying the interest that accrues.

 

Top Tips for Finding the Right Student Loan Refinance Lender

Student Loan Refinancing & Your Dating App

When understanding student loans or any part of the finance industry for that matter, you’ll notice similarities. One significant similarity is that all requested borrowers of a loan will have their information reviewed by an underwriter. It sounds complicated, but in reality, the guidelines of a loan underwriter’s job are relatively simple. In fact, you could say that the entire application process works like that of a dating app and the underwriter is the Tinder® that will get you there.

 

Swipe Left-

On a dating app, you’re not going to swipe right on everybody. Well, we hope that you have some standards for yourself! Similarly, when applying to refinance student loans, you’ll find different criteria or standards for companies. In a dating app, it’s usually pretty superficial first. The same can be said for student loan refinancing data. You see, student loan refinance lenders will have mandatory requirements like minimum student debt, minimum credit score, and others like institution attended.

 

The guidelines are pretty straightforward at this point to determine if you could be a good fit for the lender. If you are not, at this time a good fit for a lender, keep trying! Work on that credit score, assuming it’s something that can be fixed. If someone swipes left, that’s okay. It’s better to determine it now, than have it not work out later after you’ve invested significant time, energy, and emotion.

 

Swipe Right-

Dating and financial stability are relatively comparable. Both take a long time to build and can be destroyed with one simple mistake. To gain back stability, it could take years, but that shouldn’t stop you from living your life and doing what’s best for yourself. Though it can be daunting, there are times when you’ll hit it off! If you “matched” with the lender you’ll move on to your application process or the case of a dating app slide on into the DMs.

 

Getting That “Match”

Congrats, you’ve now moved on to the next level! You’ve received your notification and will start getting to really know one another. In the case of a lending institution, it can be a bit more formal. You’ll likely be submitting required documents at the time of your application. These documents differ based on the lender. Documents that are typically requested include, W-2, pay stubs, and government-issued ID.

 

The Date

Once you’ve worked your way through the application form or direct messages, it’s time for the date. Yes, the date! Here’s where your underwriter really comes into play.  An underwriter is someone that is hired by a financial institution to evaluate requested borrowers. An underwriter reviews the information that a requested borrower submits and determines if they are a good fit. Consider the underwriter your dating app, it allows you to get to know someone and learn more about them.

 

In some cases, an underwriter may feel that they do not have adequate information and may request that additional information be provided. This can be common in the case of adding a cosigner, being recently employed, or other circumstances. Don’t be thrown off if additional information is requested. Just like when you’re messaging, and your match throws you a curve ball. If you see it through both things could work out well for you.

 

Long Term

If your date worked out well for you, it’s likely you may want to go on another one. Fortunate for you, when it comes to student loan refinancing you can always continue to refinance your student loans through other vendors to get the best interest rate available. Once you’ve completed the application process and worked with an underwriter if needed, you’ll either receive an acceptance or a notification with details as to why your loan was not approved. When you’re dating well, there could be many possibilities. One of those possibilities could include getting ghosted. Regardless, we hope that it’s the beginning of a long and happy relationship for you both!

 

10 Facts About Student Loans That Will Save You Money

Our Simplest Guide To Student Loan Refinancing: Part lll

This is the third part of our Simplest Guide to Refinancing. If you’re interested in student loan refinancing and want to know everything there is to know—in simple terms—about refinancing, check out part 1 and part 2. We’ve talked about the benefits of refinancing and process to refinance your student loans, so let’s take a look at what prospective lenders will be reviewing when looking to refinance your student loan debt.

 

Refinancing After Claiming Bankruptcy

 

Bankruptcy is a challenge when it comes to refinancing. Many people may find it challenging to refinance student loans after a bankruptcy for some time. It could even take as long as ten years for a bankruptcy to clear from your credit report entirely. Bankruptcy doesn’t clear student loan debt unless an exception is made, therefore it’s best to look into refinancing before a bankruptcy. If it’s too late for that as an option, that’s okay it may just be harder to qualify for student loan refinancing after bankruptcy. Check with lenders to see what they can offer.

 

Debt-to-Income Ratio

 

Debt-to-income ratio or DTI is the amount of money you owe versus the amount of money you make. This equation gives lenders an idea of what you should be able to afford as far as payments and additional debt amounts.

 

What’s a good DTI? Some sources note 36% or less as the acceptable debt-to-income ratio. It varies based on a lender’s underwriting criteria, but having less debt and more income will qualify you as lower risk for lending. You’ll be considered a lower risk because you have a more disposable income to dedicate to your debts.

 

Credit Score and History

 

Traditionally a “good” credit score is about 680 or higher. Most lenders won’t qualify you for refinancing if your credit score is below 660, but that’s not always the case. If you have a low credit score don’t hesitate to refinance, but be aware that the better your credit score the better rates you’ll receive from lenders.  If you didn’t know, your credit score is impacted by your credit history. So what is your credit history? Well, it’s exactly that, a history of your credit.  Credit history keeps track of how long you’ve had credit and if you’re a responsible lender. Obviously the longer you’ve had credit history the better, but we can’t all have credit as children – unless your parents added you as an authorized user to a credit card when you were born. Even if you don’t have perfect credit and a long credit history, it’s worth checking to see if refinancing might be right for you.

 

Employment

There are a few things to consider regarding employment as you refinance your student loan debt. Lenders will likely look at your income from your job, the length of time you’ve worked there, and job history. If you have a job offer or promotion, you can get a job offer letter to submit that might help the lender understand your employment situation. People with long job history (and one with few gaps), higher income, and good earning potential are less risky for lenders. If you don’t hit all of these criteria, you might still be able to refinance. Without using a cosigner it’s in your best interest as a borrower to be employed to qualify for student loan refinancing.

 

 

Questions to Ask During the Refinancing Process

The State of Student Loan Debt in America Today

Education is an investment in one’s future. It opens doors to greater possibilities. It empowers people to reach their full potential. But for many, college has become an anchor instead of a sail. Crushing student loan debt can hinder a graduate’s ability to focus on the future. Some must choose careers based on salary instead of passion, just so they can handle loan payments. The constant need to earn more money stunts employee loyalty and justifies job-hopping. Even after refinancing student loans, debt still delays graduates from buying homes and starting families.

 

It’s not just an unfortunate few saddled with student debt. Consider the following statistics:

 

  • More than 44 million Americans currently carry student loan debt.
  • The total combined debt is nearly $1.5 trillion. That’s more than the total amount of credit card debt owed.
  • Student loan debt is equivalent to 7.6 percent of the U.S. GDP in 2017. To put it another way, retiring the full amount of student loan debt would take 7.6 percent of the value all the goods and services generated in the U.S. economy for a full year.
  • The average debtor owes $39,400 in student loans. That’s equal to 70 percent of the median household income in the United States, which is $56,516, according to the 2015 U.S. Census.
  • On average, student debt is far greater than the annual salary of a new college graduate. According to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American ages 20 to 24 earns just over $28,000 annually. It’s slightly better — $38,400 — for Americans between the ages of 25 and 34. However, that’s still less than the average overall student loan debt.
  • According to a 2017 PricewaterhouseCoopers survey, 40 percent of millennial employees have a student loan. Over 80 percent of them say student loans have a moderate or significant impact on their ability to meet financial goals.

 

New doctors carry an extreme amount of medical school student loan debt. About 75 percent of new doctors in the U.S. graduated with debt in 2017. The average amount is now close to $190,000.

 

This explains why New York University will now grant all medical students free tuition. That is approximately $55,000 a year per student.

 

“We thought it was a moral imperative because it’s very difficult for medical students to incur the debt burden of medical school, as well as the additional time burden of training,” Dr. Robert Grossman, dean of NYU School of Medicine, told ABC News.

 

According to the report, student loan debt can “scare away” students from a career in medicine. It may also prevent graduates from pursuing a lower-paying specialty like pediatrics.

 

Clearly, there is no quick fix for student loan debt. However, several public and private programs can ease the burden. These initiatives continue to grow as more employers recognize the value of offering financial benefits, such as student loan repayment assistance.

 

Common student loan assistance programs include:

 

  • The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program is a federal program designed to forgive student loan debt for employees of certain public and nonprofit jobs.
  • The Federal Perkins Loan Cancellation and Discharge forgives a certain percentage of student loan debt after every year of service. There are a number of ways to qualify for this program.
  • Both the Pay-As-You-Earn (PAYE) and the Income-Based Repayment (IBR) programs set repayment cap amounts based on income and family size. They also forgive remaining debt after a set number of years of qualifying payments.
  • Student loan forgiveness programs designed specific careers such as teachers, nurses, and lawyers.

 

Public programs may be a great fit for some. But for others, they may actually end up costing more over time. When considering a deferment or forbearance program, make sure you are not accruing additional interest. If so, this will then be capitalized and added to your original principal balance. Programs like IBR can be misleading. They can set graduates up to make payments only towards the interest rate accruing that month. This means they never actually apply to the principal balance of the loan. And it keeps the loan balance the same over time even though payments have been made towards the loan.

 

Before choosing a program, graduates should crunch the short-term and long-term numbers. It’s easy to get caught up in a program’s immediate impact. After all, you may only need a little breathing room in your budget. However, it’s this lack of knowledge surrounding these programs that is fueling the student loan debt crisis.

 

In response, more private employers are adding student loan and tuition assistance programs to their benefits packages.

 

“Employer-sponsored third-party student loan repayment assistance programs are projected to grow quickly in the future,” according to a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) report on student loan repayment assistance programs.

 

According to a January 2017 WorldatWork survey:

  • 4 percent of employers surveyed offer student loan debt repayment assistance.
  • 11 percent offer employee scholarships and student aid.
  • 23 percent have scholarships available for employees’ children.
  • 14 percent offer college savings plans as part of their benefits package.
  • 87 percent offer tuition reimbursement to current employees for career development opportunities.

 

A similar employee benefits survey by the Society of Human Resource Management showed that the number of employers offering student loan repayment programs increased from 3 percent in 2015 to 4 percent in 2017.

 

In general, the larger the company, the more likely it is to offer employees student aid benefits. Companies can use these programs as a recruiting tool to attract recent graduates.

 

Still, experts agree there’s much more that needs to be done.

 

Summarized the CFPB: “Recognizing that significant student debt can have a domino effect on consumers’ financial lives and overall financial wellness, reports suggest an increased interest by both large and small employers in exploring benefits to help their employees pay down student debt or help manage their employees’ student debt stress.” Most of these initiatives are steps in the right direction. However, there is still a long road to recovery ahead for those affected by the student loan debt crisis.

 

This guest post was authored by Colin Nabity. Colin Nabity is the Chief Executive Officer of LeverageRx, a digital lending and insurance company for healthcare professionals. Through software technology, LeverageRx helps healthcare professionals find better rates on disability insurance, medical malpractice insurance, student loan refinancing and mortgage loans.

 

9 Signs It’s Time to Refinance Student Loan Debt

Our Simplest Guide To Student Loan Refinancing: Part I

Student loan refinancing can seem like a terrible exercise in adulting, but if you’ve ever thought you’d rather get a root canal than learn about refinancing options, we’re here to save you.This is Part I of ELFI’s Simplest Guide to Student Loan Refinancing!

What Is Student Loan Refinancing?

Definition

Refinancing a student loan means you set up a new loan. That new loan pays off your old loan and sets you up with usually a new loan servicer, new interest rate, and different payments. The interest rate is based on current standard interest rates as well as your personal financial situation like your credit score and report and your annual income. It’s important to note that not everyone qualifies for student loan refinancing, so be sure to speak with one of our Personal Loan Advisors to see what your options are.

Example

For example, maybe you have a mix of private and federal student loans that are higher interest than what you can currently get. So if you have $25,000 in loans and you’re paying anything from 5% to 8.75% interest, if you can get them refinanced at 4%, then you will save a lot of money by lowering the rest of your payments until the debt is paid off.

Information About Student Loan Repayment Plans

When should I change my repayment plan instead of refinancing?

Sometimes you may want to pay your loans off quicker or get a lower payment if your situation has changed (like you make less money now). Those can be reasons to set up a new payment plan. Depending on the type of loan you have, you may be able to set up payments that are based on your income or that change your repayment based on helping you pay off the loan faster, or draw out payments for a longer amount of time.

Make sure to check with your loan servicer to understand your repayment options. Federal student loans have several repayment options that can lower your payment or raise your payment to help you pay off faster, but private loan options vary.

Consolidation vs. Refinancing

Consolidating

Consolidating your student loans simply means combining several loans from different servicers into one loan. It’s pretty similar to refinancing. You can combine all or some of your loans, and you’ll get an opportunity to pick repayment options that can be more manageable than paying all of your loans separately. It’s especially helpful to consolidate when you have loans from many servicers, which can be confusing to manage.

  • The interest rate you get from consolidating is based on an average of your combined loans, or a weighted average.
  • Consolidating extends the life of your loans, which can be a way to get lower payments. You pay less each month, but for a longer period of time.
  • Be careful consolidating federal loans into a private loan. There are some rights you lose under the federal student loan program if you switch your federal loans into private loans.
  • Consolidating is one way you can get out of default and start making payments again to get in good financial standing.

With the Direct Loan Consolidation Program, borrowers can consolidate:

  • Stafford Loans (Subsidized and Unsubsidized)
  • Supplemental Loans for Students
  • Federally Insured Student Loans
  • PLUS Loans, Direct Loans
  • Perkins Loans
  • Health Education Assistance Loans
  • And just about any other type of federal student loan
  • State and private loans that are not federally guaranteed aren’t eligible for consolidation with this program.

A Note About Refinancing Student Loans Instead of Consolidating

Refinancing can combine your loans and get a new interest rate and payment terms, but when you refinance federal loans, you have to get a private loan. There is no refinancing option to be taken out through the government. Government loans, however, can be consolidated through Direct Loans.

There’s so much more we could say about refinancing your student loans! That’s why we’ll be continuing this guide in Part II, which will cover different types of student loans, what to take into consideration, and what to watch out for when refinancing.

 

Be Sure to Check Out Part II of Our Student Loan Refinancing Guide

 

Questions about Part I? Give us a shout here to talk more!

10 Facts About Student Loans That Will Save You Money

Many millennials are first-generation college students, which is awesome! Going to college is a huge achievement, and you should be proud of your hard work. Navigating the financial side of college, however, can be a little tricky. There are definitely some basic facts you should know—all of them will save you money. We’ve compiled 10 facts about student loans that will save you money. Make sure you’re reaching out to your school to see what resources are available to you and read up on how you can make good borrowing choices.

  1. Not all student loan servicers are created equal.
  2. Small differences in interest rates and origination fees can mean BIG dollars down the road.
  3. Keeping an eye on your principal can help you understand the repayment process.
  4. It could behoove you to pay interest while in school
  5. Deferment is a short-term solution that you should avoid if possible.
  6. There are different reasons to consider fixed or variable interest rates.
  7. You pay taxes on forgiven loan amounts.
  8. You might qualify for loan forgiveness.
  9. There are options if you can’t pay. Don’t try to hide.
  10. Some borrowers save tons of money with refinancing.

 

Click Here to See What You Could Be Saving 

 

Not all student loan servicers are created equal

Some people think that getting a student loan from any company or bank is roughly equal. Maybe the interest rate will be a little different, but they all offer mostly the same thing. Sadly, too many millennials have found out the hard way that some student loan companies are not as reputable as others. Whether it’s a lack of payment options, little to no deferment even, or just plain difficult customer service, there are a lot of reasons why shopping around for the best service and best options can save you time and money in the end.

 

Small differences in interest rates and origination fees can mean BIG dollars down the road

The interest rate you pay for borrowing money is a percentage that’s calculated based on the principal or the amount borrowed. Interest rates might be fixed or variable, depending on your loan, and knowing the difference will save you big money. For instance, if you get a loan with a variable rate because it’s low now, you need to know how high the rate could go, which might affect your decision. When comparing loans, check the interest rate, but also look at the life of the loan and other associated fees. For example, some lenders or products charge an origination fee as well. Here’s a scenario to show how some of these variables play out:

  • A student takes out a $20,000 loan with a 7% interest rate & 0% origination fee. This loan accrues interest monthly and when it capitalizes at repayment 48 months from now, this student will have an outstanding balance of $25,600.
  • A student takes out a $20,000 loan with an 8% interest rate & 4% origination fee. This loan accrues interest monthly and when it capitalizes at repayment 48 months from now, this student will have an outstanding balance of $27,456.

It might look like a minor change, but these small differences matter a lot!

 

Keeping an eye on your principal can help you understand repayment progress

Your principal and payoff balance will appear on your loan statements and you should note those amounts each month. Obviously, you want to see them trending down, but sometimes watching your principal balance each month will help you realize how much more impact you could have on your loans if you increased or restructured your payments.

 

It could behoove you to pay interest while in school

There’s one reason why paying even just your interest payments on student loans while in school is a good idea: compound interest. Compound interest is when your interest gets added to the principal. When this happens, your principal is higher, and you end up paying more interest. To combat it, pay interest payments! If you make these small payments while in school, you won’t graduate with even more debt than you actually took out. If you continuously defer your loans, the debt grows and grows until you start paying. This is how some people get into a lot of trouble!

 

Deferment is a short-term solution that you should avoid if possible

Student loan deferral can sound like a great deal if you’re in dire straits, but there are a lot of reasons why you should avoid student loan deferral or forbearance if at all possible. These options increase your debt and add fees to your loan. If you’re in an extreme situation and have to defer payment or two that you can catch up on in a few months, you do what you have to do. But don’t opt to defer just because you want more money for something like a wedding when you could find other ways to save.

 

There are different reasons to consider fixed or variable interest rates

Government loans are always fixed-rate, but private loans can be fixed or variable. Knowing the benefits and possible downside of both options can help save you money when it’s time to decide which loan to get. With a fixed rate, you know what you’re going to pay for the life of the loan. Variable rates are not so certain. You might start with a low rate that goes up over time or vice versa, but they also generally start lower than the fixed rate. Consider how the variable rate is set and whether you’re okay with a variable rate or would prefer the fixed amount.

 

You pay taxes on forgiven loan amounts

Student loan forgiveness can be a great thing since your remaining balance after 10, 20, or maybe 25 years is forgiven. Many people don’t know, however, that current IRS rules require the forgiven loan amounts to be treated as taxable income. That means you could be on the hook for a hefty tax bill when you least expect it. Knowing this information could change the way you pay your loans, or at least prepare you for what’s at the end of the rainbow.

 

You might qualify for loan forgiveness

Speaking of loan forgiveness! Only you can figure out if you qualify, grasshopper. The government doesn’t keep track of this, and the rules for qualification are rigid. Be sure that you know your qualification status before you start planning your “student loan forgiveness day” party. Check out our blog on student loan forgiveness.

 

There are options if you can’t pay. Don’t try to hide (other word choices for ‘hide’ – run, ignore it, lie, pretend it’s not there).

The worst thing you can do is ignore student loan payments. Student loan companies have ways of getting money from you even if you’re hiding under a blanket in mom and dad’s basement. If you ever can’t pay your student loans, call them immediately and talk about options. You might be able to set up a new payment option or refinance to save some cash and keep making payments.

 

Some borrowers save tons of money with refinancing

There are many ways to save money with refinancing. For instance, if you consolidate private and federal student loans into one monthly payment, you might be able to score a lower payment. If you have several loans with high-interest rates or if rates have gone down since you borrowed, refinancing your student loans can save you bundles.

 

Common Misconceptions About Student Loan Forgiveness 

What’s the Best Way to Repay Student Loans?

While serving your student loan debt sentence, you’re likely searching for any and every way to ease the discomfort of burdensome monthly payments. Perhaps you’ve looked into some student loan repayment plans like income-driven repayment (IDR) programs, the most common option being the income-based repayment (IBR). (Find out more about IDRs)

 

Standard Repayment Plan

By default, federal loans start out on a 10-year Standard Repayment Plan that often result in a fairly high monthly payment. For example, if your income was $30,000 a year and your student loan debt totaled $34,722 with an interest rate of 3.900% your monthly payments would be $350. That can be tough for someone balancing rent/a mortgage, food and transportation costs.

Your income – $30,000
Student Loan Debt – $34,722
Interest Rate – 3.900%

Under Standard Repayment Plan
Monthly Payment= $350
Total Amount Paid =$41,988

These high monthly payments are why recent grads on an entry-level salary, seek relief through an IBR or IDR plan. This allows their credit score to stay intact. Also give borrowers some additional money to live their lives. This may sound great to anyone really struggling, but in the long run it can really end up costing, almost double your original loan amount.

 

Income Based Repayment

Income based repayment reduces your monthly student loan payments by placing a cap on how much you’ll pay. No matter how much your income may increase, payments on IBR plans are capped at 10% of your discretionary income (if loan money was received after July 1, 2014) or 15% if you received loan money before July 1, 2014. IBRs require you to recertify every year; your monthly payments are likely going to increase over the course of your repayment term. If you get a raise or switch jobs to a higher salary, your monthly payments are going to jump up right along with it.

Your income – $30,000
Student Loan Debt – $34,722
Interest Rate – 3.900%

Income-Based Repayment Plan
Monthly Payment= $98
Total Amount Paid =$48,523

The IBR “Forgiveness”

Most borrowers count on the remainder of their debt being forgiven after 25 years. However, understand that like laws do, there is a possibility that this can change. In addition, many borrowers don’t take into account the fact that it’s considered taxable income in the year of your release. Forgiveness comes with a price because you’re essentially trading student loan debt for a tax debt that’s due the same year you’re supposedly celebrating your student debt freedom.

 

How Income-Based Repayment really works

Without a doubt, income-based repayment is a successful method of lowering your monthly payments, but that’s about all it’s good for, unfortunately.

Not only are you more than doubling the number of years you’ll be sitting on debt row, you’re also accruing interest on all those extra years. What’s worse – the interest is then capitalized, meaning it’s added to the principal balance of your loan and you end up paying even more interest on the higher balance – in most cases significantly more than the original amount you borrowed in the first place.

Bottom line, if you’re struggling out of college to pay your loan and get on your feet, it may be a temporary solution for a year, or two. We’d never recommend IBR as your entire student loan payoff solution since most payments don’t even cover the interest being collected during that month.

 

Lower your monthly payments by refinancing

Refinancing your student loan debt is perhaps the most flexible way to manage your monthly payments. It allows you to consolidate your various loans into a single, easy-to-remember monthly payment, as well as choose whether you want a variable or fixed interest rate. You can even negotiate your repayment term for the optimal monthly payment.

Refinancing with a reputable lender like Education Loan Finance enables you to significantly lower your monthly payments and lock yourself in for the duration of your term. Our customers have reported that they are saving an average of $309 every month and should see an average of $20,936 in total savings after refinancing their student loans with Education Loan Finance.* (Find more ways to Pay Off Student Loans Faster)

 

Refinance vs. Income-Based Repayment

On the surface, IBRs certainly seem like an enticing option, but it’s crucial to know the long-term consequences associated. If the only goal is to lower your monthly payment, IBR is not only capable of achieving the task-at-hand but also readily available for nearly all federal loan borrowers.

Refinancing, on the other hand, is a much more intentional way of paying down student loan debt. It’s customizable for your budget and you can lock in your interest rate and know exactly how much you’ll pay every month for the life of your loan.

 

10 Facts About Student Loans That Will Save You Money

 

 

* Average savings calculations are based on information provided by SouthEast Bank/ Education Loan Finance customers who refinanced their student loans between 8/16/2016 and 10/25/2018. While these amounts represent reported average amounts saved, actual amounts saved will vary depending upon a number of factors.