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Top 10 SAT Resource Publications for Students

July 11, 2019

Preparing to head off to college in the next year or two? If so, are you stressing out about the SAT? Colleges use SAT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships. The SAT has three parts: reading, writing, and math. Studying for the SAT can help familiarize you with what the test looks like, develop relevant strategies and skills, and prepare you to achieve a high score. Here’s a list of self-guided prep books that can help you prepare for the SATs.

  1. The Official SAT Study Guide – The College Board. Pages: 1,145; Price: $19.01-$19.36The Official SAT Study Guide is a publication of The College Board, the organization that creates and administers the SAT. It includes eight practice tests that are similar to the exam. Each of these tests is available as a free, downloadable PDF on The College Board’s website. In addition to the tests, the book has an additional 250 pages of instruction, guidance, and test information. This volume should form the basis of your self-guided SAT studying program.
  2. SAT Prep Black Book: The Most Effective SAT Strategies Ever Published – Mike Barrett and Patrick Barrett. Pages: 575; Price: $24.50-$28.49SAT Prep Black Book deserves a place on your bookshelf right next to The Official SAT Study Guide. The book is authored by an SAT tutor who has guided many students in preparation for the test. Readers will learn how to use the ins and outs of the SAT to their advantage. It includes a walkthrough of more than 600 official SAT questions. The publication is written in a conversational style and is full of understandable advice for doing well on the SAT.
  3. The Complete Guide to SAT Reading – Erica Meltzer. Pages: 349; Price: $29.19-$33.20The Complete Guide to SAT Reading is a comprehensive review of the reading skills required to achieve high scores on the reading section of the SAT. The author is an experienced SAT tutor who provides breakdowns of SAT Reading types of questions. She gives in-depth explanations and numerous examples of how to effectively work through every kind of problem. This book offers helpful guidance for your SAT prep, no matter your level of reading skills.
  4. SAT Vocabulary: A New Approach – Erica Meltzer and Larry Krieger. Pages: 133; Price: $17.99-$18.95SAT Vocabulary covers critical vocabulary for the reading, writing and language, and essay sections of the SAT. Rather than just providing long lists of words and their meanings to memorize, the book teaches you to understand the various contexts in which vocabulary is tested. You can then test yourself by applying what you have learned with practice exercises.
  5. The College Panda’s SAT Essay: The Battle-tested Guide for the New 2016 Essay – Nielson Phu. Pages: 64; Price: $18.99-$21.52Nielson Phu is a teacher who achieved a perfect SAT score when he took the new SAT in 2016. A copy of his high-scoring essay is included in The College Panda’s SAT Essay. And, amazingly, Phu states that he’s not a naturally gifted writer. In this book, you’ll find Phu’s tips, strategies, and resources to enable you to score well on the SAT essay, even if you don’t think you’re a “good” writer. This short book is worth reading cover-to-cover.
  6. The College Panda’s SAT Writing: Advanced Guide and Workbook for the New SAT – Nielson Phu. Pages: 270; Price: $10.29-$28.49Nielson Phu loves to write books to help students achieve a perfect SAT score. Don’t be intimidated, though – The College Panda’s SAT Writing provides comprehensive coverage of what you need to know to do well in the SAT writing and language section. It gives clear explanations of every grammar rule tested on the SAT, from the most basic to the most obscure. It also includes hundreds of examples, drills, and practice questions. To make the study of grammar less boring, Phu has even added in some fun illustrations.
  7. The College Panda’s SAT Math: Advanced Guide and Workbook for the New SAT – Nielson Phu. Pages: 254; Price: $22-$28.49The College Panda’s SAT Math is a comprehensive guide to the SAT Math section. This publication is aimed at the student reaching for a perfect score, and, in pursuit of this goal, it leaves no stone unturned. The book has clear explanations of the math concepts tested on the SAT, ranging from the simplest to the most complex. It also provides hundreds of examples, over 500 practice questions, and lists of the most common mistakes students make. Even if you don’t think you can achieve that perfect score, this book is an excellent way to brush up on your math skills.
  8. Bring Home the Score: A Private Tutor’s Guide to Scoring in the Highest Echelons of the SAT, ACT, SHSAT, GRE, GMAT, LSAT, NCLEX, MCAT, or Any Other Standardized Test – Walter Tinsley. Pages: 86; Price: $9.96-$9.97Don’t be put off by the lengthy subtitle of Bring Home the Score even if you have to look up what “echelon” means. This volume is jam-packed with tips, tricks, and strategies to land you among the top scorers on any standardized test – including the SAT. You will learn mental strategies to improve your motivation and avoid burnout from an overly aggressive study regimen. Bring Home the Score can help you create a schedule that’s intense but manageable.
  9. Solve. Create: The Insider’s Guide to the ACT and SAT –
    Scott Moser. Pages: 523; Price: $19.68-$29.95People don’t usually think that standardized tests and creativity go together. The author of this book, a private test prep tutor, bases his strategy of success in the SAT on individualization and process rather than focusing on rote memorization. Reason. Solve. Create. aims to help the reader become a better thinker. For example, the same reasoning skills that are used in writing a poem can also be applied to solving a math problem or correcting a mistake in grammar. Information pertaining only to the SAT is clearly marked.
  10. The Perfect Score Project: One Mother’s Journey to Uncover the Secrets of the SAT – Debbie Stier. Pages: 288; Price: $6.45-$16.45The Perfect Score Project is not a traditional SAT prep book but provides an interesting and insightful read for both students and parents. Debbie Stier, a single mother and an author, wanted to help her son prepare for the SAT. To this end, she took the test seven times in one year. She also studied every way possible to prep for the test. The result is a book with tried-and-tested answers to every SAT question a student might be asking themselves: When do I begin? Do I really need test prep with a big name? Do I need a tutor, a class, or can I self-study? What’s the one thing I need to know? Stier’s son did well on the SAT, and so can you.

 

All of these books can be purchased online, and the prices are for new and used books as advertised at the time (June 1, 2019) of this writing. The number of pages is approximate and is based on the table of contents for each book.

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2019-09-19
Adulting Tips: 8 Resume Keys to Help you Score that Next Job

Whether you are in the process of heading off to college, or you are graduated and looking to continue your path to financial freedom through student loan refinancing – the work ethic you developed to get into and through school will be a major part of your continued success. But as you enter or progress through your career, the way you present yourself holds even more weight. It’s time to start thinking of your personal brand. Your resume is a key component of how your personal brand comes across to employers. It’s your first opportunity to impress hiring managers and will determine whether you get that in-person interview. For these reasons, it’s essential that is promotes you in the best light possible. Follow these steps (and avoid these mistakes) to achieve the perfect resume.  

1. Customize it.

Submitting a vague, boring resume is a sure way to get yours moved to the bottom of the stack, or out of the pile altogether. No matter where you are in your career path, whether looking for a part-time job in high school, an internship in college, or applying for a job after school, you should always take the time to customize your resume to the job you’re applying for (check out Huffington Post’s tips for customizing your resume). But remember, a little goes a long way here.  

2. What does your email address say about you? 

Your prospective employer shouldn’t look at your resume and think “this person is cool.” In fact, you probably don’t even want them thinking twice about it. You should always avoid email addresses that use nicknames, profanity, or have humorous connotations. Use a simple email address that consists of variations of your first, middle, and last name. We love the tips on creating a professional email address from Hubspot.  

3. Organize it.

You want the employer’s eyes to be drawn to the most important parts of your resume – so be sure to highlight them and make them prominent. If you’re fresh out of school with no work experience, highlight your academic accomplishments; if you didn’t have a great GPA in school but have good work experience, highlight the experience first. Know what your selling point is and prioritize it over your supporting facts.  

4. Don’t be passive or lazy in your use of language.

Showing laziness in your resume? A recipe for unemployment. Be sure to explain your duties at each job, and don’t sell yourself short. Even if two jobs are similar in nature, be sure to express how the experiences were different because it will exemplify some versatility. Using statements like: "same as above" and "etc." when writing your resume shows poor effort and undersells your experience.   

5. Choose the right font.

Be sophisticated, not flashy. Choose a standard font that will be readable by the hiring manager on their phone, laptop, tablet, or any operating system. Your resume may be scanned by automated applicant tracking software, so using a basic font is probably best. Some common examples of “resume-safe” fonts are:
  • Calibri
  • Arial
  • Garamond
  • Georgia
  • Helvetica
Check out some more tips on choosing font size and weight from Indeed.  

6. Show that you are detail oriented. 

Typos and other errors are one of the most common blunders that would cause a hiring manager to discard a resume. Submitting a resume that has typos only confirms that your attention to detail is lacking. Don’t be that person. Just like your credit score can reflect your attention to detail in your personal finances as you seek out student loans or to refinance student loans, your resume is that short summary of your professional experience. Don’t let a typo drop your score with your future employer.   

7. Why you? 

Most importantly you want to make an impact on a hiring manager. You need to put emphasis on your accomplishments. Think of instances where you achieved success at previous jobs, on classroom projects, or during extracurricular activities. Your goal is to demonstrate measurable successes to the greatest extent possible. Maybe you were you able to help a previous employer increase revenue by 10%. Or you created marketing campaigns in your college courses that five actual companies were able to use and implement. Or you organized a fundraising event that raised funds for a charity in your community. For some inspiration, here’s JobScan’s list of examples of accomplishments you can put on your resume.  

8. Algorithms are everywhere.

Many employers use electronic databases to store applicant resumes, and scanning tools are programmed to look for key terms in your resume. Using the right keywords may help you get noticed and earn an interview. Use the job posting or description to help you determine which keywords, such as specialized degrees, languages, skills, etc, to include on your resume. We hope this Adulting Tip lets helps you score that next big career move. Education Loan Finance is here to help you along your financial journey from funding your college career to refinancing student loans – we want to empower your path to financial freedom.   Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.   NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
2019-09-16
What I Would Have Told Myself in College: Barbara Thomas

  Barbara Thomas, Executive Vice President of Education Loan Finance (ELFI) provides some financial advice to college students based on her own experiences in college.   Hello, I’m Barbara Thomas. For most, like me, my college days were a great experience that lead to incredible personal growth. I had a marvelous sense of freedom and made many new friends. However, I have spent much time reflecting on what I would do differently if I could begin my college life all over again, given what I know now. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, isn’t it? So here’s my advice to all of you who are preparing to enter college, or are currently in your freshman or sophomore years.

Choose an Affordable College

When looking for the right college, don’t get beguiled by a famous name and a beautiful campus. And, while a state-of-the-art fitness center or an Olympic-size swimming pool might be important if you’re an athlete, most of the time you will be paying for them in higher college fees. Instead, make sure to keep your eyes on finances, as affordability should be a top concern. Considering the fact that many students end up taking on sizeable student loan debt, keep in mind that you (most likely) won’t be living on that beautiful campus in your late 20s or 30s.

Rethink Your Path to the Best Education.

Just because a college is more expensive, doesn’t
necessarily mean that it’s better than one that costs less. You should look upon college as an investment in your future. Consider what the return on investment (ROI) from your college education will look like. In other words, analyze which college is likely to provide you with the most bang for your buck. Here’s a report from U.S. News & World Report that gives you the ROI of different colleges.

Look at Alternatives to a Four-Year College.

If you find out that college is not the best path for you, it can turn out to be an expensive mistake. Keep in mind that dropping out of college won’t make your student loans disappear. So before you enroll in a college, consider these alternatives:
  • Take a gap year to earn money to put toward going to college and give yourself more time to decide what you want to do.
  • Consider attending a trade school to learn a valuable skill with high earnings potential.
  • Spend two years at a community college. Attending a community college can help you save on tuition. However, if you plan to transfer to a college of your choice, be sure to do some checking. Find out how many transfer students are accepted and how many of your community college credits can be used.
Do your research and crunch the numbers to make sure you’re making the best choice.

Earn More While in School

A survey of millennials found that earning money while in college was the number one thing that participants wished they had done (or done more of). This reflects the increasing financial cost that goes along with obtaining a college degree. The College Board estimated that in 2017 (updated figures are available), the average student loan debt upon graduation was $28,500. Keep in mind that a heavy debt load is going to affect your financial future – your ability to buy a home, start a family, and save for retirement. Apart from financial considerations, there is no better way to acquire real job skills than to hold down a job and learn about its demands firsthand. Employers know this, which is why previous work experience is the most popular measure to assess job candidates, even those straight out of college.

Research Ways To Lower Your Monthly Student Loan Payments

So, you’ve done everything right - you chose the higher education path that was right for you, and you have landed an interesting job. Now, what about those student loan payments? Are they weighing you down and preventing you from leading the life that you had envisioned after college? ELFI has a solution to your problem – it’s called refinancing. You can close out your original loan and take out a new one with a lower interest rate and/or a longer term. This can significantly lower your monthly loan payments. Get in touch with us to see how we can help you!  

Learn More About Student Loan Refinancing With ELFI

  Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.
2019-07-31
What is FAFSA? And Why You Should Care

What does FAFSA stand for? FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid. You must submit the FAFSA to apply for federal and state financial aid to see you through college, and it must be submitted every year that you want financial assistance. Even if you don’t need federal financial aid, college admissions officers recommend that you complete the FAFSA process. Also, some private scholarships require the submission of the FAFSA. In both instances, this is because the application indicates your interest in the school and can boost your chances of getting in. Each school that you have listed on the FAFSA will receive your financial information after you’ve completed the form.  

How do I Get a FAFSA?

The FAFSA paperwork is available in both a printed and online format. Most families find it more convenient to complete the FAFSA online these days - to do so, go to
www.fafsa.ed.gov. Here you will find pre-application worksheets and step-by-step instructions for filling out the FAFSA. You can sign your completed form electronically with a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID that can be obtained by going to this link. You can even opt to file your FAFSA from your mobile device. There are the following advantages to completing the FAFSA process online:
  • You’ll likely receive your Student Aid Report (SAR) quicker than if you had used the paper or PDF forms.
  • Your FAFSA will be less prone to mistakes because the online process comes with built-in error checks.
  • The expenses of the federal government will be lowered as its processing costs are reduced.
  • With the online FAFSA, you can list up to ten colleges; the paper version only has space for four. You should list all of the schools you’re interested in whether or not you’ve applied or been accepted yet. 
 

School Codes

Each school has a six-character Federal School Code (also known as a Title IV Institution Code) that you need to enter into your FAFSA. Be aware that some institutions have several codes to designate different campuses or programs. You can obtain a code by using this search form or calling the school's financial aid office.   

Paper FAFSAs

Paper versions are no longer distributed in bulk to high schools, libraries, and colleges, except in areas where students may not have access to the Internet. However, if you want a paper version, you can order up to three copies by calling 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3242) or 1-391-337-5665. (Those with hearing impairments should call 1-800-730-8913.)  

Expected Family Contribution (EFC)

Your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is a number that colleges use to calculate the amount of financial aid you’re eligible to receive. The EFC takes into account various factors such as your family’s income, assets, size, and any other family members who are attending college at the same time as yourself. Usually, a lower EFC increases your eligibility for more financial aid. Use a handy EFC Calculator, such as the one from FinAid to calculate your EFC and receive an estimate of your eligibility for financial assistance. You can also run “what-if” tests to find out how much assistance you’ll receive under various scenarios.  

When Should I Submit my FAFSA?

The FAFSA is available on October 1 of the year before you plan to attend school. Applications are considered on a rolling basis up until a summer deadline (which varies). Earlier dates may apply to state and school-specific aid programs. Don’t wait until the deadline; the earlier you submit your application, the more aid programs you’ll be in line for.  

So What Does This All Mean?

If you’re planning on enrolling in higher education, you’re probably giving some thought to financial aid. Completing the FAFSA will help you earn the federal financial assistance you need and deserve. For a very detailed guide to filling out your FAFSA, click here. And, don’t forget that help may be available from an advisor at your school.    After college, if you want help and advice on managing your student loan debt, talk to ELFI. Give us a call at 1.844.601.ELFI to speak with a dedicated Personal Loan Advisor.     Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.   NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.