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Asking for a Raise

October 22, 2018

At one point or another in one’s career, you arrive at the realization that, “I need more money.” When that realization hits you can spend less, save more money, or make more money. Maybe you’ve cut way back on spending, but it’s still not enough. You might have even considered refinancing your student loans or downsizing your home or apartment. Did someone say “tiny house”? Jokes aside, at some point, you’ll come to the conclusion: You need a raise. Tough nobody likes asking for a raise, if you want more money, you probably have to. Here are a few tips we’ve gathered on how to increase that take-home pay.

 

But Why?!

 

Did you get a new car? Did your landlord raise your rent, or did you lose a bunch of money investing in cryptocurrency? These are all reasons you might need money, but they aren’t good reasons to ask for a raise. Look at it in a different way. Say you go to a coffee shop every day and your $3.00 coffee is suddenly $3.50. You ask the guy behind the counter why the price went up. If his answer is, “we’re serving higher quality coffee” or “we have bigger cups, now.” you may not care much about the price increase, but if he says “we want to make more money,” then you might not be as happy. Your salary is no different. It’s a business decision that needs to be made. Your boss needs to understand why you need more money. Just like any other business vendor if you’re bringing more value to the company, that’s a great way to earn a raise. By the way, stop buying that coffee, you can make it way cheaper at home. Hello, French Press.

 

Toot Your Own Horn

 

It’s not enough to do a good job and hope it gets noticed. Make sure your hard work gets noticed! If you have positive news to share try and do it in person. Let your supervisors know any milestones you’ve achieved or when you’ve met or exceeded goals. Now, let’s be clear here we aren’t saying go bragging about yourself at every opportunity to the point it is obnoxious, but anytime you can let them know you’re helping, do it. This can be one of the hardest things for some people to do. Many workers tend to lean towards the humble side and just aren’t self-promoters. If it’s just too hard for you, try seeing if others will help to share your efforts with the boss and do the same for them. Regardless, the simple truth is when you get noticed more, you usually get paid more.

 

This is EVERYTHING

 

Timing can be everything when it comes to a raise. And that can be tricky. Knowing when and how your job evaluates pay increases is important to know. Sometimes, you’ll walk into a performance review and there will already be a decision made regarding your compensation. At some companies, there’s never a set time and you won’t ever get a raise if you don’t ask. What is usually best is after you’ve laid your plan as to why you deserve a raise, set up a time to talk with your boss one on one. This will let them know that one, you want a raise and two you’re serious about finding a way to make that happen.

 

Work Past the “No”

 

Let’s face it getting a raise isn’t always easy. The answer could very well be “no.” Use that “no” to figure out what it’s going to take for them to say “yes” and allow that to set some new goals for yourself. That way when the opportunity comes around again you can show them what you have accomplished.

 

Find Someone Who, Will

 

Don’t ever threaten to leave as a means of getting a raise, but if they’re not willing to give you the compensation you feel is deserved, maybe it’s time to start looking. Your company may not be in a good financial state or just unwilling to pay more. Some companies lowball employees on salary simply because they’re betting you’re not going to leave. If you don’t feel valued, see if you can get more compensation elsewhere. If you go this route of finding a new job, just make sure you’re making a logical decision and not an emotional one. The grass often looks greener in another pasture, but people often leave a job for more money only to find the hours are longer, the expectations are higher, or it’s not a pleasant environment. If you decide to leave, know what you’re getting into and compare compensation before you make a decision. Let’s say you do get an offer and you’d consider staying at your current job, see if they will counter offer. If they are truly happy with you, they will often agree when faced with the cost of finding hiring and training a new employee.

 

Out of the Box

 

If you can’t adjust your salary to your lifestyle then you need to adjust your lifestyle to your salary. There’s probably plenty of ways to save without pinching every penny. Most you’ve probably heard of like cutting down on subscription services, eating out less, cutting the cord on cable, or buying used products. To save money you may have to think outside of the box. One thing you can do that typically most people don’t think of is—refinancing student loans. Refinancing could help to lower your interest rate, saving you in the long term, and probably lower your monthly payment which means more cash for you.

 

Regardless, how you choose to proceed in your journey of asking for a raise understand your strengths. In order to really understand the value that you bring, you need to know what you’re good at. Be sure to stay on top of the news and changes in your industry. If you’re constantly looking to improve your own personal skills this can help to attribute to the value you bring your company. Go ahead and sign up for that Saturday webinar or get that additional certification you want. Be your best and if your current company can’t seem to see that, then it’s time to move on. Good luck on your career journey!

 

 

 

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2019-07-15
Differentiate Your Company to Recruit the Best Employees

There’s fierce competition in the global marketplace to attract and retain high-potential employees. In a competitive hiring environment, your company needs to project a strong and appealing corporate identity to land the best team members.   Those recruiting employees are scrambling for differentiators and value propositions to make their company stand out. Companies that attract and keep employees who share in their vision have distinct advantages: lower turnover costs, a more committed workforce—and an increased ability to exceed sales and production goals. Many recent college graduates begin their careers, expecting to jump from job to job frequently. Changing that mindset is a significant challenge for businesses. The following suggestions can help your company attract the best new hires—and retain them for years to come.  

Polish Your Company Brand

Today’s job seekers are looking for more than just a good compensation package. They want to be part of a team that emphasizes shared values and a unified purpose. A company and its workforce should have a recognizable brand with clearly communicated values. By clarifying your core values and creating a cohesive mission statement, you define your business philosophy and give new recruits a glimpse into your workplace culture.   Make a deeper impression on potential new team members by going a step further: Let high-potential employees experience your company culture firsthand. Consider including activities like these in your recruitment process:  
  • Tour of facilities & on-site amenities
  • Lunch with staff at the corporate lunchroom
  • Face-to-face meetings with company or division heads
  • Informal conversations with valued team members
  • Off-site mastermind gatherings with new and existing employees
  You will reduce turnover costs when you identify new staff members who share your company values and have the potential to fit seamlessly into your corporate culture. Understanding your company’s management style and the characteristics of your most successful employees can prevent potential hiring mistakes. One of the most common reasons cited for an employee leaving a job is a “poor relationship with management.” Your company will succeed at employee retention when you understand and communicate your management style and company culture at the outset— before you have spent the resources to recruit and train the wrong candidate.  

Create a Meaningful Compensation Package

A competitive salary is essential to new team members, but other types of compensation may seal the deal. Companies seeking to differentiate themselves from competitors offer compensation packages that are meaningful to their employees. In addition to healthcare benefits, paid time off and 401K fund matches, employees are looking for perks and benefits that enhance their lifestyle.   A recent Robert Half survey cited these desirable additions to a company’s compensation package:  
  • Paid parental leave
  • Opportunities for professional development
  • Profit-sharing plans
  • Student loan reimbursement
  • Dental & vision insurance
  • On-site amenities like childcare, gym & concierge services
  • Compressed workweek
  • Telecommuting
  • Flexible work schedule
  • Paid time off for volunteering
  Many perks are an expression of your company’s culture, adding purpose and engagement for your high-potential employees. Consider sponsoring a community food drive or park clean-up. Host social events, investment seminars or concerts. You could also incorporate monthly rewards for employees who exceed expectations, such as a $50 meal certificate. This would drive your employees to perform to their highest every month and maintain workplace morale. Today’s recent grads respond to a work environment that meshes with their personal values and interests.    

Sell High Potential Employees on Your Company

Once you have identified a talented candidate for hire, make the sale. New recruits who understand how they fit into your company’s culture and structure are more likely to invest themselves and stay. Boost talent retention by defining a path forward within the company. New hires want to know they will have opportunities for professional development, continuing education and the possibility of internal promotion. Show them where they could be short term, such as a year or two in the future. Seeing the growth within arm’s reach will give them the drive to perform the best they can. They are also highly focused on achieving work-life balance. If your business model permits it, offer greater work flexibility with schedules that allow work-from-anywhere options and unstructured time on the job.  

Add Student Loan Repayment Benefits

Corporate help with student loan repayment is a big plus for high potential employees and a key business differentiator. ELFI for Business has the expertise to help your HR department put together an attractive hiring package with sought-after benefits like these:  
  • Financial education
  • Employer contribution match
  • On-site consultations
  • Budget-friendly refinancing options
  Connect with ELFI for Business right from your HR portal—or call 844.601.ELFI to discuss the positive impact these benefits have on hiring and engaging valuable team members.  

Why Are Employees Leaving Your Company?

  NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the web sites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.  
2019-07-03
Measuring the Costs of Employee Turnover

Best-selling business management author Jim Collins was asked during a 2001 interview if he had identified a good business response to the economic slowdown that had gripped the nation. His widely quoted answer is as relevant today as it was at the time:   “If I were running a company today, I would have one priority above all others: to acquire as many of the best people as I could [because] the single biggest constraint on the success of my organization is the ability to get and to hang on to enough of the right people."   Nearly 20 years later and in a highly improved economic climate, Collins’ words still encapsulate the biggest challenge facing HR departments of corporate giants and small start-ups alike: finding and retaining quality team members. In an era of competitive recruitment and job-hopping staff, your company risks losing monetary and human capital each time a valued employee chooses to leave. Employee turnover impacts your bottom line and your company's culture. To set wise employee retention policies, you first need to assess the costs of staff turnover accurately and measure the full impact of employee loss.  

Direct Costs of Replacing Employees

A talented employee exiting your company costs you money. Estimates of how much employee turnover costs can vary by industry and employee salary. A study by Employee Benefit News estimates the direct cost to hire and train a replacement employee equal or exceed 33% of a worker’s annual salary ($15,000 for a worker earning a median salary of $45,000). Cost estimates are based on calculatable expenses like these:
  • HR exit interview & paperwork
  • Benefit payouts owed to the employee
  • Job advertising, new candidate screening & interviewing
  • Employee onboarding costs
  • On-the-job training & supervision
You can track the expenses of your company’s employee turnover using this online calculator, or create a spreadsheet to determine how actual costs add up to affect your bottom line.  

Full Impact of Employee Loss

Josh Bersin, a human resource researcher, writing for LinkedIn, refers to employees as a business’s “appreciating assets.” Good employees grow in value as they learn systems, understand products and integrate into their teams. When one of these valuable employees leaves, the business loses more than just the cost of hiring and training a replacement. Bersin cites these additional factors contributing to the total cost of losing a productive employee:
  • Lost investment: A company typically spends 10 to 20% of an employee’s salary for training over two to three years.
  • Lost productivity: A new employee takes one to two years to reach the level of an exiting employee. Supervision by other team members also distracts those supervisors from their work—and lowers the team’s collective productivity.
  • Lost engagement: Other team members take note of employee turnover, ask “why?” and may disengage.
  • Less responsive, less effective customer service: New employees are less adept at solving customer problems satisfactorily.
  According to Bersin, studies show the total cost of an employee’s loss may range from tens of thousands of dollars to 1.5 to 2 times that employee’s annual salary.  

Strategies to Slow Employee Turnover Rates

An effective exit interview helps you and your HR team pinpoint the drivers of your company’s employee turnover. You may find that hiring practices need to be refined or employee engagement should be enhanced. Changes to the break room space, such as fresh fruit or games, will allow your employees to relax and come back to work with fresh eyes and a better attitude. This will keep up the workplace morale, shaping your company culture to include perks appealing to younger workers and will lead to increased job satisfaction. Today’s employees are career-oriented and highly motivated. Keep them on your team with other opportunities such as:  
  • Pathway for advancement within the company
  • Professional development & advanced education
  • Flex-time & work-from-anywhere options
  • Management support & recognition
  • Lifestyle rewards or amenities like catering & concierge services
  • Culture of shared values & volunteerism
 

Add Student Loan Benefits Through ELFI

Student loan repayment tops the financial-worries checklist of many recent graduates. Older team members question their ability to pay for educating their children. New, highly desirable HR benefits like student loan contributions and financial literacy education are emerging from these employee concerns—and ELFI for Business is leading the way for employers to incorporate them into hiring packages. You can connect with ELFI directly from your HR portal and access multiple ways to contribute to employees’ student loan debt. We offer new-hire onboarding booklets, educational newsletters and onsite consultations filled with information for you and your employees. Reach out to us at 1.844.601.ELFI to add cutting-edge benefits to your HR employee package!  

Learn More About ELFI for Business

  NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the web sites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
2019-06-28
How Do You Become an Employer of Choice?

Is your company—the company everyone in your industry wants to work for or an “Employer of Choice?” Employers of choice consistently retain their highest performing employees and attract the best and the brightest over their competitors.  Employers of choice have little trouble recruiting talent since college graduates line up eagerly to interview for coveted jobs.   In today’s competitive labor market, the majority of companies do not qualify as employers of choice. Their workforces are in constant flux, and the cost of employee turnover is hurting the bottom line. Fortunately, that cycle can be halted and reversed. Any business can become an employer of choice by following these five strategies to transform company culture into one that (1) delivers value to employees, and (2) encourages their engagement.  

Make Your Workplace a Positive Environment

If your business has been getting by with lackluster performance and frequent turnover, you’ll need a critical eye to evaluate the current culture. Try to hire for longevity and look for the best possible fit for each unique position. Employers of choice search for employees who can make a positive impact on not only their work but their team, too.   With capable and involved staff, from new-hires to top management, you can build a workplace recognized for its atmosphere of trust, personal growth, and positive performance. There’s no room for micromanagement in this kind of workplace environment. Entrust your employees with a mission, direction, and goals—then step aside. Allow them to make decisions and respect their choices. In a positive environment, differences of opinion become opportunities for learning and growth.  

Provide Relevant Compensation & Benefits

Competitive compensation has always been a hook to catch the attention of potential employees. Even if your business cannot support top-tier pay and benefits, you can shape your compensation package to deliver the value your employees want. Offer the best salary you can afford and supplement it with bonuses and perks that reward company performance. Recognize that today’s employees place a high value on their time—and offer flexible scheduling and remote work options. Consider turning the standard break room into a comfortable lounge where workers can relax, play games or socialize. Go beyond the traditional benefits by adding college loan contributions, paid time off for family emergencies and parental leave to your benefits package.  

Encourage Professional Growth

Engaged employees have a keen interest in professional growth and career development. Employers of choice encourage this interest by supporting their team with relevant training and additional growth opportunities, including:  
  • Professional development seminars
  • On-the-job continuing education
  • Exposure to new tasks through job rotation
  • Tuition reimbursement for certifications & advanced degrees
  • Pathways for advancement
 

Establish Transparency

People like to know where they stand in a relationship, job, or career. Professionals who feel uncertain about their place in the organization, workplace expectations, or their own performance may seek other opportunities with another company. Transparent communication and clearly defined expectations give your team the perspective they need to stop worrying and start investing in the job. Employers of choice also develop channels for mentoring, giving helpful feedback and praise, and rewarding performance and risk-taking. They provide opportunities for teams to voice their ideas and concerns. Feeling safe and appreciated, employees buy-in to the company culture and become engaged.  

Create a Collaborative Culture

If your company is to become an employer of choice, you must develop a respectful and collaborative community. Engaged employees appreciate corporate responsibility, and they have expectations of your business that go beyond products, services, and profits. Workers want to feel their companies are good local and global citizens. Employers who embrace charitable outreach are rewarded with employees who are more confident, purposeful, and willing to work as a team. You can boost staff morale and develop a meaningful and relevant work community by sponsoring activities that include:  
  • Food & clothing drives
  • National fundraisers
  • Community clean-up initiatives
  • Health & wellness fairs
  • Recycling events
  • Health awareness campaigns
 

Become an Employer of Choice With ELFI for Business

Today, a college degree is more accessible than ever—and more expensive. An employer contribution to student loan repayment is one of the best ways to attract loyal employees. ELFI has created a cutting-edge benefits program that is easy to access through your HR portal and includes multiple incentives for attracting and keeping top talent. Take the first step to becoming an employer of choice.  

See Why Employees Leave

    NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.