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Student Loan Forgiveness 101

April 9, 2016
Updated November 1, 2019

Student loan forgiveness (also known as cancellation and discharge of student loans) is the act of releasing a borrower from their obligation to repay all (or a portion) of their federal student loan(s), including the principal and interest. It is only provided under certain circumstances, to those with federal loans, and to borrowers who meet certain eligibility requirements. While it may seem hard to qualify for student loan forgiveness (see how less than 1% of applicants were approved for Public Service Loan Forgiveness), it’s helpful to understand the circumstances that would qualify for student loan forgiveness so you can be sure you aren’t missing out. There are a variety of options available, all of which intend to reduce or eliminate student loan debt.

 

This introductory guide to student loan forgiveness aims to help readers familiarize themselves with the options and eligibility requirements surrounding federal student loan forgiveness. It includes student loan forgiveness categories, income-driven repayment plans, state, and city-sponsored forgiveness options, as well as explains what happens once a student loan forgiveness application is approved or denied.

 

Keep in mind that the bottomline is that unless your circumstances line up with these mentioned, you’ll have to pay your loans according to the promissory note you signed – even if you were a minor when you signed it, can’t find employment, or aren’t happy with your education.

 

Student Loan Forgiveness Categories

There are a variety of circumstances that may lead to federal student loan forgiveness. However, none are guaranteed and each circumstance may or may not apply to the borrower’s particular type of federal loan. Furthermore, certain categories of loan forgiveness mandate that applicants meet certain eligibility requirements, including items such as qualified monthly payments and qualifying employment. The following list highlights the different federal loan forgiveness categories, but borrowers should also review this chart, from the Federal Student Aid Office, to ensure their circumstance applies to their particular federal loan type (Direct Loans, FFEL Program Loans, and Perkins Loans):

  • Closed School Discharge

 

Borrowers who believe they may qualify for student loan forgiveness are encouraged to read more about the possibilities related to federal student loan forgiveness and cancellation. These borrowers should also contact their loan servicer (the company handling billing and services related to the student loan) to further discuss their options.

Finally, if a student loan forgiveness application is placed under review, borrowers should continue to make payments on their loan to prevent it from going into default or accumulating additional interest until all final decisions are made.

 

Income-Driven Repayment Plans & Student Loan Forgiveness

The Federal Government’s four income-driven student loan repayment plans forgive a student’s remaining loan balance after either 20 or 25 years. These payment plans work by creating a set, monthly payment amounts that are based on what is affordable for the borrower’s income and family size. After making qualified payments for the entirety of the repayment period, the loan’s remaining balance is forgiven. Applying for an income-driven repayment plan is free with the Federal Government, and per Federal Student Aid (an office of the Department of Education), “most federal student loans are eligible for at least one income-driven repayment plan.” The repayment plans — and a few of their details —include:

  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR Plan):

The IBR Plan requires that a borrower meets certain eligibility requirements. Depending on when the loan was issued, monthly payments are generally 10 percent or 15 percent of the borrower’s discretionary income, and the repayment period is either 20 or 25 years.

 

  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR Plan):

The ICR Plan is open to all borrowers with eligible federal loans. Payment amounts are the lesser of the two options: either 20 percent of the borrower’s discretionary income or what the borrower would pay on a repayment plan with a fixed payment over the course of 12 years (adjusted according to income). The repayment period is 25 years.

 

  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE Plan):

The PAYE Plan requires that a borrower meets certain eligibility requirements. Payments are generally 10 percent of the borrower’s discretionary income, but it is never more than the 10-year Standard Repayment Plan amount. The repayment period is 20 years.

 

  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE Plan):

The REPAYE Plan is open to all borrowers with eligible federal loans, and payments are generally 10 percent of the borrower’s discretionary income. The repayment period is 20 years for loans solely dedicated to undergraduate study and 25 years when the loans have been used for graduate or professional study.

 

Borrowers using an income-based repayment plan may also be eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Qualifying for this plan means borrowers with a remaining Direct Loan balance will have loans forgiven after 10 years of qualifying payments, rather than 20 years. Learn more about the program and its qualifications here.

 

State and City-Sponsored Loan Forgiveness Programs

Student loan forgiveness programs may also be offered by particular states and cities. These local-level loan forgiveness programs are often directed at particular professions (for example physicians, health care providers, and teachers) when the city or state faces an employment shortage in a critical profession. Loan forgiveness for those with careers in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and law are also frequently offered. To find state and city-based loan forgiveness programs, try searching one of the following databases:

  • Physicians looking to find states offering loan repayment and forgiveness, as well as scholarship opportunities, will find the Association of American Medical College’s (AAMC) searchable database most useful.

 

Approval or Denial of Student Loan Forgiveness

Approved: Borrowers who are approved for student loan forgiveness are no longer obligated to make student loan payments unless only a certain amount is forgiven. Additional benefits may also include a refund of past payments, the removal of any negative credit records related to default payments, and a renewed eligibility to apply for federal student aid (as long as there are no other defaulted loans). However, there are cases in which the borrower may be responsible for refunding a portion of the loan to the U.S. Department of Education, so it is important to understand and verify every detail throughout the process.

 

Denied: Borrowers who are denied student loan forgiveness remain responsible for repaying the remaining balance of the loan. Your repayment plan will follow the terms of the promissory note that you have signed. It is unlikely that a final decision can be appealed (with the exception of false certification and forged signature discharges).

 

More Options

Borrowers who are ineligible for student loan forgiveness and income-driven repayment plans — as well as borrowers with private loans — will find that additional money-saving options still exist in the form of student loan refinancing and consolidation. No matter the situation, we recommend that borrowers talk to a student loan expert to find the plan and benefits that best suit their short and long-term financial goals. For questions about refinancing and consolidating student loans — both private and federal — contact the specialists at Education Loan Finance.*

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

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2020-03-30
Should You Save for Your Child’s College Fund or Pay Your Student Loans?

As you start to grow your family, you may be wondering whether you should continue to aggressively pay down your student loans or start saving for your little bundle of joy’s college fund. Do you immediately set up a 529 to start saving for their college expenses? Or should you focus on paying your student loans before saving for your kid’s college? Here is some information to consider before you decide.   For the 2018-2019 school year, families spent an average of $26,226 on college. With tuition rates and the cost of living increasing, higher education can be an expensive endeavor to undertake. In 2019, 64% of families planned to pay for college by saving, according to Sallie Mae’s “How America Pays for College 2019 Study”   With all this in mind, you may think it’s a good idea to start saving for your child to attend college when they are a newborn. Perhaps the heavy burden of your student loans is something you want your child to avoid. However, it’s important to consider some factors:  

Do you have a healthy retirement account?

Financial experts will argue you should not save for your child’s college expenses if it prevents you from saving for your retirement. The argument is based on the fact that you can’t borrow for your living expenses in retirement, but your child can borrow for school costs. If you wait to save for retirement after sending your child off to school with their tuition saved for, you will be missing out on vital years of compounding. Saving for retirement early can earn you thousands of dollars more than if you were to start saving later!  

What do your other debt payments look like?

Is your financial situation stable enough to be able to pay tuition or save for future tuition costs? To determine this you should consider what debt (including your student loans) you have. Are you able to make all your debt payments? Do you have an emergency fund you are contributing to? If you have unpaid debts or don’t have an emergency fund, you may need to delay saving for future college expenses at this time.   

Can you afford tuition payments or monthly college savings in your budget?

If saving for your child’s college expenses is a priority for you, plan for it in your budget. If you are able to continue making your own student loan payments, save for retirement, and continue to build an emergency fund while saving for your child’s college expenses, go for it! Ready to make a budget, but not sure how? Check out this budgeting method  

Options to Consider 

If you want to help with your child’s college expenses but it’s not financially feasible at this time, here are some ways you may still be able to help:
  • Refinance your student loans. If you are trying to save some money in your budget for your child’s college expenses consider refinancing your student loans. Refinancing allows you to obtain a new loan, presumably at a lower interest rate, to pay off your old loan. The new loan with a lower interest rate can result in significant savings for your monthly payment and in interest costs over the life of the loan. This monthly savings can go directly into your child’s college savings. To find out how much you may be able to save, check out our student loan refinance calculator.* 
  • Don’t feel bad if saving for your child’s higher education is not something you can afford. In 2019, 50% of families borrowed for college. This figure also includes families who had some savings. Student loans, both federal and private, are an important resource to pay for college expenses. Help your child determine how much they need to borrow and compare their options.     
  • If it’s not in the budget to save for future education expenses start saving any cash gifts your child receives. Take those gifts and open a 529 plan for your child. A 529 is a tax-advantaged investment account that allows you to save for qualified higher education expenses such as tuition and room and board. 
 

Ways to Save on College Costs

When you are deciding how to pay for college expenses, be sure to include your child in the discussion. After all, they will be starting their adult life and should have a good understanding of finances. Here are some points of discussion to get you started:
  1. Can they take Advanced Placement classes or do dual enrollment in high school to earn college credits? Earning college credits while still in high school is significantly less expensive, or possibly free in some cases, and can cut down on the required number of classes when they actually attend college. This can help them graduate early or reduce the amount of tuition you need to pay. 
  2. Is your child considering a private or public college? The type of school they are considering can have a significant impact on the cost. In 2019, the average cost of a private school was $48,510 per year compared to $21,370 for a public college. Though the sticker price for a private college is a lot higher, private schools often have the ability to give more generous financial aid. Before eliminating a potential college due to costs, be sure to look at their financial aid statistics. 
  3. Will they be eligible for any scholarships? There are a number of general and niche scholarships that your child can apply to. College Board’s Scholarship Search is a good resource to find out about scholarship opportunities. Tip: Be sure to fill out the FASFA, which allows you to be eligible to receive aid such as grants, scholarships, work-study and federal student loans. 
  4. Will your child have a job during school to help pay for expenses? A job on campus can be a great way for a college student to be more involved on campus and earn money for their living expenses. 
 

Bottom Line 

The ability to help your child pay for future educational expenses can be a great feeling. But before you take on this endeavor, you’ll want to be sure that your financial situation is stable enough. Armed with this information, you can make an informed decision for how you can successfully pay off your student loans and save for your child’s college expenses.  
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.   Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
2020-03-25
Current LIBOR Rate Update: March 2020

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of March 17, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog, LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 0.75%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.75% (0.75% + 3.00%=3.75%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

 

(Source: macrotrends.net)

   

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.05%%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.05% (1.05% + 3.00%=4.05%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

  (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 6 month LIBOR rate is 0.91%%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.91% (0.91% + 3.00%=3.91%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

  (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Monday, March 17, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 0.86%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.86% (0.86% + 3.00%=3.86%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over the past year.

  (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 
 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

2020-03-18
How to Plan a Wedding While Paying Student Loans

By Caroline Farhat   Congratulations, you’re engaged! Planning a wedding is an exciting time! From choosing your attire to picking out a venue and decor, there are a lot of decisions to make and many that can be costly. If you’re starting to plan your big day, you might be wondering how you’ll pay all of these extra expenses while still paying your student loan debt and regular bills. Don’t worry, we’ve got your back! Read on for some tips on how to plan a wedding with student loans on your radar.    

1. Set Realistic Expectations

A majority of the costs for a wedding are based on the number of guests, so you can save money by keeping your guest list relatively small. For example, if you plan a wedding for 350 people you will most likely need a bigger venue than you would for 100 guests. Venue costs typically account for one-third of ceremony and reception costs so this can be a major budget buster. Food and beverage and wedding favors are also typically charged per person. Because weddings can be expensive and extravagant or budget-friendly and low-key, it’s critical to discuss your desires and budget with your partner before you start planning.  

Here are some good points to discuss:

  • Parameters for the guest list: Do you want to invite your college roommate you haven’t seen in three years and every cousin on your partner’s side? Or are you looking for a more intimate affair with just your closest family and friends? 
  • Your near-term financial goals (besides the wedding): Are you saving for a down payment for a home? Considering starting a family? Understanding your joint financial goals is a great way to guide your expectations. 
  • Location of the wedding: Agreement on location is key because it will drive all of your other planning. If you’re eyeing a destination wedding and your partner wants a backyard wedding, you will want to understand each other’s individual desires so that you can create a joint wedding that makes both of you happy!
 

2. Set a Budget and Stick to It

Before you plan a budget, it helps to know who will be contributing to the wedding costs. Will you be paying for wedding expenses equally with your partner? Do any family members want to help with costs? This information can help shape your budget.     The average cost of a wedding in 2019 was $28,000 according to
The Knot 2019 Real Weddings Survey. This figure only accounts for the ceremony and reception and can vary widely depending on your location. When you add in the average costs of an engagement ring ($5,900), a honeymoon ($5,000), and other wedding events such as the rehearsal dinner, bachelor/bachelorette parties, and engagement parties, the actual wedding costs can be much higher. If these numbers are making you want to elope in Vegas, don’t panic. There are some ways you can try to lower the cost of a wedding: 
  • Going DIY - DIYing at least some elements of the wedding can save you a good chunk of money. If you’re a Pinterest aficionado, try creating your own wedding invitations or centerpieces. Better yet, homemade wedding favors would be extra special for your guests and can save you hundreds of dollars.
  • Barter - Do you have friends that are photographers, florists, musicians, or bartenders? Bartering can help keep your expenses down while still getting the services you need. 
  • Timing - Are you dead set on having a June wedding or are you more flexible? In some areas, the month you pick can have a big impact on cost! Typically, June is a higher cost since it’s considered peak season, while winter weddings tend to be less expensive. Additionally, having your wedding on a Friday or Sunday can save you some money compared to a Saturday wedding. 
  Tip: It’s important to keep in mind that most wedding vendors do not require full payment upfront. Many vendors require a downpayment to secure their services and final payment closer to the wedding date. Open a separate bank account or flag any money you set aside for final wedding payments so that it doesn’t get used for other expenses that might pop up.   

3. Cut Expenses

In the midst of all the wedding costs, it may seem like any money you had leftover at the end of the month is now going towards the wedding. If money gets tight, think of ways to cut expenses: 
  • Refinance your student loans: Refinancing can be a great way to get extra cash now and set you and your partner up for a better financial future. Refinancing can save you on your monthly payment, as well as save you on interest costs over the life of the loan. For example, if you have a $35,000 loan with an 8% interest rate and get approved for an interest rate as low as 3.99% you could be saving up to $70 per month and over $8,000 in interest costs. Check out our student loan refinance calculator to see how much you could be saving.*   
  • Cut cable or cell phone bill: If you still have cable, it’s easier now than ever to cut the cord and still watch the shows and sports you want to see. Still paying a high cell phone bill? Compare carriers and call your existing provider to see if you can lower your bill.  
  • Reduce eating out or other entertainment expenses: It may not seem easy or fun to stop eating out or to cut back on entertainment, but reducing these expenses now could be just what you need to afford the band or DJ you really want at your wedding. 
 

4. Start a Side Hustle

A side hustle is a way you can earn money outside of your day job. The possibilities for a side hustle are endless: You could babysit, walk dogs, pick up a part-time job, etc. The extra money can help pay for your wedding expenses or you could put it towards your future financial goals. Earning extra money is not only helpful during wedding planning when you will experience extra expenses, but it can also help you after the wedding to make additional payments on your student loans, save for a new car or fund a dream trip.   

Bottom Line

Planning a wedding with student loans can be a stressful time. Don’t let your student loans be a part of the stress. With realistic expectations and a budget, you can manage to have the wedding of your dreams while still paying down your student loan debt!   
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.   Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.