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Tour These 6 Stunning College Campuses in the Eastern US From Your Couch

October 7, 2019

If you’re like us, you have a deep appreciation for college campuses – literally any college campus. When you stop to think about it, they’re so much more than just institutions of higher learning. Often, they’re the most aesthetically-pleasing, historical, and lively landmarks within a city. We’ve partnered with the team at eCampus Tours to highlight 5 stunning college campuses you can discover right from your couch. Let’s a take a look at our favorites from the Eastern US.

 

Princeton University 

This Ivy-league standout needs no introduction. Established in 1746 and known for its high academic standards and even higher achieving students, you can experience everywhere from Firestone Library and McCosh Courtyard to Rockefeller College Common Room and Carl Icahn Laboratory without worrying about finding a parking spot. Tour here.

 

 

University of Florida

Start at the Century Tower and traverse your way to the 90 thousand-plus seating found in Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. The Plaza of the Americas is a well-known campus spot where you can see students lining up for Krishna Lunch, slacklining or lounging around in hammocks in-between classes. Tour here.

 

 

Temple University

This college campus tour begins in the The Liacouras Center Sports & Entertainment Complex, home to championship Owls athletics, and where everything from concerts to wrestling matches are hosted. Take a stroll through the brick-lined Founder’s Garden and experience the bustling Shops on Liacouras Walk. Tour here. 

 

 

College of Charleston

This liberal arts and sciences university sits in the heart of historic Charleston, and though many of the Greek Revival and Federal-style buildings look like remnants from the past, it provides students with cutting-edge technology and modern curriculum. The tour begins at Sottile House and College Greenway, showcasing the school’s vine-clad fences and meticulously-maintained lawns. Other highlights include the Cistern and impressive Addlestone Library Rotunda. Tour here.

 

 

University of Kentucky

Established in 1865 in the heart of the Bluegrass State, the University of Kentucky is a campus steeped in tradition as much as academics. From the main quad (known as the Quadrangle) and Memorial Hall, which honors casualties of WWI to Maxwell Place, home to the university President, the comprehensive e-tour provides an accurate snapshot of this university’s unbridled spirit. If you can’t make a trip to Rupp Arena, home to Wildcat athletics, an eCampus Tour is the next best thing. Tour here. 

 

 

Colgate University

This prestigious private liberal arts college in Hamilton, New York was founded in 1819. With a student population that’s about the same size as the city’s population (just under 3,000 students), this university is known for its sense of community. Nearly half of upperclassmen are involved in Greek Life, and games are often played outside of the Academic Quad. A more modern addition to the campus, the Little Hall Art and History building is home to art made by students in their classes. Colgate’s Seven Oaks Golf Course is ranked among the top five college courses in the country by Golf Digest. Tour here.

 

Whether you’re a rising high school senior still scoping out where to spend your college years, or like us, and appreciate everything a vibrant college campus brings to a community, we think you’ll find the over 1,300 tours on eCampus Tours well worth the visit. 

 

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

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Woman holding a smartphone
2019-10-15
Best Apps for Budgeting in College

Managing money is hard, but budgeting in college? That’s a whole different ballgame. For a lot of students, you have so much to worry about with classes, work, and other involvements that finances often slip your mind. So how do you hold yourself to a budget when you can barely remember to feed yourself dinner? Luckily, we live in an age full of apps to help you get a jumpstart on budgeting and money management. Here are a few of our favorites.   Mint®. Mint is a free mobile app where you can view all of your banking accounts in the same place. It automatically updates and puts your transactions into categories so you can see where all your money is going - and where it’s coming from. It also recommends changes to your budget that could help you save money. Its features include a bill payment tracker, a budget tracker, alerts, budget categorization, investments, and security features.   PocketGuard®. Like Mint, PocketGuard allows you to link your credit cards, checking, and savings accounts, investments and loans to view them all in one place. It automatically updates and categorizes your transactions so you can see real-time changes. PocketGuard also has an “In My Pocket” feature that shows you how much spending money you have remaining after you’ve paid bills and set some funds aside. You can set your financial goals, and this clever app will even create a budget for you.   Wally®. This personal finance app is available for the iPhone, with a Wally+ version available for Android users. Like other apps on this list, it allows you to manage all of your accounts in one place and learn from your spending habits. You can plan and budget your finances by looking at your patterns, upcoming payments and expenses, and make lists for your expected spending.   MoneyStrands®. Once again, with this app, you’ll have access to all the accounts you connect. Its features allow you to analyze your expenses and cash flow, become a part of a community, track and plan for spending, create budgets and savings goals, and know what you can spend without going over budget.   Albert®. A unique feature that Albert emphasizes is its alert system. When you’re at risk for overspending, the app will send you an alert. The app also sends you real-time alerts when bills are due. Enjoy a smart savings feature, guided investing, and the overall ability to visualize your money’s flow and create a personalized budget.   Before you download any budgeting app, make sure you check out the reviews and ensure it’s legitimate. Because a lot of apps ask for your personal financial information, it’s essential you verify their legitimacy before entering your account number. Listen to what other people have to say and then choose the option that works best for you, because not every app will be perfect for everyone. Budgeting in college may be hard, but downloading an app is just one way you can make it easier. Maybe you don’t want to use an app at all. If you’re in that boat, you can check out some other approaches to budgeting here or here.   Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.
Professor teaching a college class
2019-10-02
Who Is Considered a Full-Time College Student and Why Does it Matter?

Are you at that important time in your life when you are seriously considering going to college? If so, you probably have a shortlist of colleges that you would like to attend. However, just as important as where you will go to college is the consideration of how you will go to college. Will you be a full-time student or a part-time student? It seems pretty obvious that a full-time student will go to school more often during the academic year than a part-time student. However, what you probably don’t realize is that what distinguishes the two tends to vary by college or university. It’s essential that you know the enrollment requirements of any college that you are thinking of attending.

What Is the Definition of a Full-Time College Student?

  The most obvious difference between a full and part-time student relates to
how many credit hours are taken during a semester. To be regarded as a full-time student generally means working toward a minimum of twelve credits (approximately four classes). Part-time is usually considered to lie somewhere in the area of two to eleven credits (one to three classes).   However, what counts as full time at a school that uses a semester system will likely vary from what counts as full-time at a school that uses a quarter system. To make things easier to understand, students are usually classified as full-time as long as they take more than half of a traditional course load.   To learn if you will be considered a full-time student, check with the college of your choice. The registrar’s office will most likely have the college’s definition posted online. If not, a quick phone call or email is the best way to go. Note: if you are a student with some learning differences, then a full-time course load for you might vary from that of other students. Be sure to check with your college on your particular situation.

Does my Enrollment Status Impact my Tax Deductions?

  Whether or not you are classified as a full-time student can affect different aspects of your education – including any impact it might have on your taxes. For example, you may qualify for certain tax credits and deductions as a full-time student that you would not be eligible for as a part-time student. As we saw above, sometimes this status question is school specific. Luckily, the IRS simplifies things by stating that it will regard you as a full-time student if: you are ‘attending an education program for at least five months per calendar year’. Keep in mind, the five months do not need to be consecutive or full. If you are counting on certain deductions, then you should check with your tax advisor before taking any action (such as dropping a class) that might affect your enrollment status.   These tax implications also apply if your parents or guardians claim you as a dependent. To do so, you (the student) must be under the age of 24 and be a full-time student.   Will My College Enrollment Status Affect My Student Loans?   Most importantly, financial aid packages and student loans are influenced by whether your status is a full-time or part-time student. Often times, academic scholarships require a certain grade point average and the maintenance of a certain enrollment status – think full-time vs part-time enrollment. Check with your financial aid office when considering the shift from full-time to part-time to better understand the cost impact to not only your college provided aid but federal aid as well.   If you are a full-time student with private student loans and have selected deferment payment plan while in school, you do not have to begin paying back many student loans until you drop below full-time status (and often times 6 months after that due to a grace period). This is designed to allow students to make it through their college career and find employment prior to paying off their student debt. If you change your status you may trigger the commencement of your student loan payments sooner. Don’t let yourself be blindsided by reducing your course load only to discover that you have to start making student loan payments you had previously thought were delayed until after graduation. If in doubt call your lender to get clarifications on your individual scenario.   Does course load impact student athletes? If you’re a student-athlete, you are already balancing your class load and practice and travel schedules. That could be a strain and it might have you thinking about scaling back your class load. Keep in mind, you may not be eligible to compete if you fall below specified enrollment requirements. This full-time status is very similar to grade requirements, codes of conduct and other requirements set forth by your college and the conference it belongs to. Be sure to speak with your coach prior to making changes to your schedule or class load if this is of a concern.   What Are the Benefits of Being a Full-Time Student?   One obvious benefit of going to college full-time is that you’ll get through college faster than a part-time student. As mentioned earlier, there are also many scholarships with the eligibility requirement that you must be a full-time student. Don’t underestimate the positive impact these scholarships and grants can have on your total cost of attending college. And, if you want to live on campus, some schools require you to be a full-time student.   Can I Be Both a Full-Time and Part-Time Student?   It’s completely acceptable to mix the two types of statuses varying between semesters. If the stress of full-time school gets to be too much, you might benefit from taking a part-time semester or even a part-time year. Situations change, and the important thing to remember is that you can adjust your schedule to whatever fits your needs. Just remember to talk to your financial aid office at your college so that you understand how your decision affects your status at the college and your college finances.   After you have that well-earned degree in your hand, it will be time to begin tackling your student loan debt. If you are burdened by high monthly payments from your existing student loans, there is a way out – it’s called student loan refinancing. Talk to ELFI to find out how we may be able help you lower your monthly student loan payments or help you pay down your balance faster*.   *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply. NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
High School Girl Doing College research
2019-10-01
Tips for Choosing a College

Choosing a college to attend is not an easy task, and there are many factors to consider when making your pick. Should you go to your parents’ alma mater? What about the one with the best student life or athletic teams? Prestige certainly is a factor for many students. When all is said and done you want to pick one that sets you up for success in your career and provides and opportunity to thrive – whether it be by practicing your passions or helps you grow as an individual. Whatever the reason, these tips will make choosing a college much easier.  

Start by making a thorough list of schools.

By making a list of schools that you are interested in attending, you’re giving yourself a starting point for deciding which are worth taking next steps with. Decide which ones you would like to see in person and which stand out as your ideal schools. If you’re having trouble at this stage, try picking a few that are far different from each other – whether they’re small, large, in the city, in the country, private, public, etc. Deciding the type of school you want to attend is a good first step.  

Do you research on each school before you visit.

Doing research before you visit will allow you to develop expectations for the school. These expectations can then be compared to what you experience when you visit, giving you a more thorough impression of the school. You can look through brochures and the school website, but also be sure to check around online for various ratings and reviews from past students. As always, double check your sources.  

Take notes when you visit.

Visiting colleges is fun, so sometimes its easy to forget whether a school meets the criteria you set forth when you’re taking a tour. Bringing a notepad for this very reason can be very effective at allowing you to review the schools after visiting – especially if you plan to visit multiple schools. This way you won’t mix up any information. Then, you can refer to these notes when deciding where you want to apply.  

Find other members from the campus to help you decide.

When you start narrowing your list of schools down further, start contacting other sources that can help you get more information about the school. While it may seem like a bother, talking to the admissions officer, professors and current students is the best way to get a true feel for what to expect from a school. Students are the most likely to give you unbiased answers.  

Take your own tour in addition to the admissions tour.

The admissions tour is beneficial, but viewing the campus on your own will give you the chance to see the whole campus in a scope more similar to what students experience. View the parking facilities, actual classrooms, and areas that would pertain to your major (if you know your major prospective major).  

Don't forget to ask questions.

You may want to prepare a list of questions to ask beforehand just to make sure that you don't forget anything. Ask questions regarding academic, financial, housing/food, social, community, athletic, and safety aspects.   For more information about visiting college campuses, read 
The Campus Visit and Making the Most Of the Campus Visit. Remember, if you can't visit a campus in person, you can always take a virtual tour of the school.  
    NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.