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Four Student Loan Repayment Strategies To Avoid

May 20, 2016
Updated November 13, 2019

According to an article published by The Wall Street Journal, 2016 graduates have set the newest record for graduating with the most student loan debt — an average of $37,172. With America’s accumulated student debt exceeding $1.2 trillion, and at least two-thirds of American graduates leaving their respective universities with some kind of debt. The article however, still remains positive, stating that new graduates should see a greater return on their educational investment, thanks to the potential to earn a higher income over their lifetime.

 

Even with this news, it is hardly a surprise that those owing tens of thousands of dollars (or more) in student loan debt are looking for various ways to pay it back faster and save a little money in the process. While a variety of helpful strategies do exist, it may be best to avoid certain repayment strategies, including the following:

 

1. Only Paying the Minimum Payment

Paying a loan’s minimum monthly payment is necessary to pay bills on time and to protect a borrower’s credit score. However, only paying the minimum payment and nothing more will be more costly in the long run because it allows more interest to accrue. Paying more than the minimum payment, even if just by a modest amount each month, is one of the easiest ways to reduce any form of debt — whether it is student loan or credit card related — and foster long-term savings.

 

Pay attention to the interest rates of all student loan debts and see which is more effective to pay off first. For the greatest money-saving potential, try to pay down student loans with higher interest rates first. A helpful way to do so is by paying more than the minimum payment or through strategies such as student loan refinancing.

 

2. Making Life-Long Payments

“Life-long” payments happen when a loan’s life (loan term) is extended to keep the monthly payment as low as possible. When borrowers first start chipping away at what is owed on a loan, the need to keep monthly payments as low as possible by extending the life of the loan is understandable. However, extending the loan’s term can be a costly option. For instance, doubling the repayment term from 10 to 20 years – and paying the minimum monthly payment (mistake #1 above) – could double the interest that a borrower will pay back over the life of a loan.

 

Instead of creating a “life-long” repayment plan, borrowers should instead consider refinancing their student loans in order to potentially qualify for a better interest rate. However, if extending the term creates a payment necessary to maintain a comfortable budget in the near term, borrowers can often offset some of the additional long-term cost by voluntarily making higher payments as their income increases.

 

3. Tapping Into Retirement Accounts to Pay Off Student Loans

Many people have a tendency to avoid thinking about their financial future, especially when other payments are due in their present. However, it is important to avoid withdrawing money invested in retirement plans to pay off student loans. Tapping into 401(k)s or other retirement plans to pay off student (or other) loans depletes money that may be needed later in life, and it also could result in reduced earnings potential of their savings or retirement accounts.

 

Instead of borrowing from or delaying contributions to retirement accounts to pay student loans, consider how refinancing student loans may create a more manageable, money-saving payment plan. Learn more about managing your 401k and paying off student debt.

 

4. Delaying or Missing Student Loan Payments

Delaying or missing payments on any type of debt — student loans, credit cards, or other financial commitments — is not a good financial decision and could impact your credit scores and future ability to borrow money. Good credit scores are important for receiving better rates on future loans, so doing everything you can to avoid credit score setbacks is essential. To remain in good standing with current or future creditors, borrowers should pay at least their minimum monthly payments.

 

You may also want to pay more than the monthly minimum payment to improve your debt to income ratio, another factor in your credit standing. Then when the time comes to refinance student loans or apply for a loan on a major purchase, borrowers may be more likely to receive a better offer with better terms and interest rates.

 

Benefit from On-Time Payments of Loans

Financial responsibility starts with paying your student loans on time each month. Making on-time payments are important to your overall credit score and can be beneficial when you refinance your student loans, as it may lead to better interest rates and terms. When student loans are refinanced with Education Loan Finance, borrowers are able to make payments greater than the minimum (without penalty), thereby increasing the likelihood of paying off their student loans more quickly and at a lower cost.* For the greatest money-saving potential, always be diligent and disciplined with the repayment of student loans.

 

What’s the Best Way to Repay Student Loans? 

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

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2020-01-24
This Week in Student Loans: January 24

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

  This week in student loans:

A Zero Based Budget Helped This Woman Pay Off $215k Worth of Student Loan Debt in 4 Years

When Cindy Zuniga accomplished a major milestone when she graduated from law school in 2015, however, she also came out with $215,000 in student loan debt. See how she managed to eliminate her debt in just four years by both refinancing her student loans and using a zero based budget.  

Source: ABC News

 

signing legislation

Court Cites Student Loans As Reason To Deny Bar Admission To New Lawyer

Student loan debt can sometimes be a barrier to obtaining professional licensure, specifically for teachers, doctors, and nurses. For one recent graduate of law school, her student loan debt played a significant role in her being denied a license to practice law.  

Source: Forbes

 

Student Loan Debt Is a Key Factor for Gen Z When Making Career Decisions

A recent survey found that Gen Z's concern over student loan debt is a key factor in their career decisions, causing many to prioritize finances over passion when it comes to their fields of study. The study found that an overwhelming 61% of college students would take a job they're not passionate about due to the pressure to pay off their student loans.  

Source: Yahoo News

    That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.  
 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

2020-01-23
Current LIBOR Rate Update: January 2020

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of January 15, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 1.67%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.67% (1.67% + 3.00%=4.67%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

  Chart displaying current 1 month LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020.

(Source: macrotrends.net)

   

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.84%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.84% (1.84% + 3.00%=4.84%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

  Chart displaying current 3 month LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020. (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 1.87%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.87% (1.87% + 3.00%=4.87%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over the past year.

  Chart displaying current 6 month LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020. (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate - January 2020

As of Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 1.95%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 4.95% (1.95% + 3.00%=4.95%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over the past year.

  Chart displaying current 1 year LIBOR rate as of January 15, 2020. (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 
 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

young professional smiling after receiving a raise
2020-01-22
How to Use a Pay Raise Responsibly

Getting called into the boss’ office for the first time can feel a little reminiscent of getting called into the principal’s office. You immediately start sweating and wondering what you did wrong. But just like the principal's office, it's not always bad news. In fact, sometimes it's the best news of all: you just got a raise. Congrats! Take yourself out for a celebratory dinner and maybe even splurge on brunch this weekend. But come Monday morning, it's time to get down to business and determine how to use your raise.    You could just enjoy the extra cash coming into your checking account, yes. But, that little financial angel on your shoulder might also nag you about being smarter with that money. Unfortunately, most high school and college classes don’t teach us how to be responsible with our money. We learn all sorts of questionably-practical information like the Pythagorean Theorem but not how to file taxes or how to use a raise responsibly.    To cover that gap in information, we’re here with three actually practical suggestions to use that raise in a way both your principal and your boss would be proud of.   

3 Practical Tips to Use a Raise Responsibly

 

1. Boost Your Retirement Savings

If your employer has a 401(k) plan, you should already be allocating 3–5% of each paycheck toward a retirement account, especially if your employer offers a 401(k) match. This means they’ll contribute as much to your savings as you do, up to a certain amount. Many employers match contributions up to 6% of your salary, and this is, literally, free money. If you contribute 3% of your $50,000 salary, that's $1,500 a year from you and $1,500 a year from your employer for retirement savings.    When you get a raise, you should adjust your paycheck to dedicate a portion or the full amount of that raise to your 401(k) contributions. This is an easy way to save more without much thought or effort needed. If you do this right away, you don’t get used to the extra money, and you just continue living and paying bills as you did before the raise.    If you’re young, this type of contribution can be especially rewarding because of a concept called
compounding interest. This means the interest on your investment earns interest, not just the principal (or original) balance. If you invest $1,500 with a 10% interest rate, your balance would be $3,890 in 10 years. With a simple interest rate that only builds on the initial investment amount, your 10-year balance would be only $3,000.   

2. Pay Off Debts

Another savvy way to use your raise is to allocate a portion or the full amount to your debts. This can be credit card debt, student loan debt, or even repaying a personal loan from mom and dad. But debt isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Certain debts like student loans carry low interest rates so when you consider how to use your raise, consider that other accounts or investments with higher interest rates might make or save you more in the long run. For example, if your student loan has an interest rate of just 8%, it makes more sense to pay off a credit card with a 24.5% interest rate or invest in a stock with a 10% return rate.    >> Related: Should I Save or Pay Down Student Loan Debt?  

3. Allocate the Rest to An Emergency Fund

We alluded to this before, but you don’t have to put all your extra cash in one place. If you get a 5% raise, you can direct 4% toward your student loans and put even 1% in an emergency fund. You should build the emergency fund until you have at least six months of your salary in the account to help you cover bills and general living expenses in case you find yourself suddenly out of work. If six months seems unattainable, aim for at least one or two months to give you four to eight weeks to find work. This emergency fund can also come in handy if unexpected medical bills or car repairs pop up.    If you haven't been lucky enough to get a raise from your employer, or if you’re looking to boost your savings even more, you can give yourself a raise by refinancing student loans.    If you meet the eligibility requirements, student loan refinancing through companies like ELFI can get you a lower interest rate*, which means you could pay less each month and, subsequently, less over the life of the loan. Use the difference between your previous and current monthly payments as a raise. Then allocate that money to your retirement funds and toward paying off debts. ELFI customers reported saving an average of $309 every month and an average of $20,936 in total savings after refinancing student loans with Education Loan Finance.1 That’s a 7.4% raise, which is far above the predicted average 2020 cost-of-living raise of 1.6%. You can refinance both private and federal student loans.    Deciding how to use a raise responsibility is a big decision. Hopefully, with these tips, you can find ways to use those funds in a way that will give you even more play money in the future. The average raise is 4.6%, and with a little knowledge and discipline, you can turn 4.6% into thousands of dollars if you make the right choices on how to use a raise responsibly.  
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.  

1Average savings calculations are based on information provided by SouthEast Bank/ Education Loan Finance customers who refinanced their student loans between 8/16/2016 and 10/25/2018. While these amounts represent reported average amounts saved, actual amounts saved will vary depending upon a number of factors.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.