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Forgo Deferment & Forbearance on Your Student Loans

June 11, 2018

It’s tough to cover a mortgage, wedding, new baby, or medical expense on top of your student loan payments. As such, it can be tempting to request deferment and forbearance on your student loans. Before you apply for these options, be sure to understand the hidden costs that can lead to a much higher, much longer repayment down the road.

Both federal and private student loan programs offer deferment and forbearance options. These options provide you with temporary relief from your burdensome monthly payments and may seem like a good option to avoid a delinquency or default. Think again. Not making payments during your deferment and forbearance periods results in the capitalization of the interest you owe, meaning your loan principal will subsequently increase. Voila! Not only have your monthly payments ballooned when you inevitably start making payments again, but you now owe way more than you did when you first took out the student loans!

Deferment

Deferment is pushing back payments due to a temporary situation and your loan provider has a list of qualifications. The most common types are In-School Deferment, Graduate Deferment, and Military Service Deferment. For Parent PLUS Borrower loans, it is only available to parents who received Direct PLUS Loans or FFEL PLUS Loans. The deferments listed below are available to Direct Loan, FFEL Program loan, and Perkins Loan recipients only as per the Federal Student Aid government website. Types of deferments available differ based on your education loan lender, but there are commonalities between all private student loan debts. According to US News, private lenders can offer deferment relief for up to 6 months, or in extreme cases 12 months.

Federal Student Loan Deferment Types

  • In-School Deferment Request
  • Parent PLUS Borrower Deferment Request
  • Graduate Fellowship Deferment Request
  • Rehabilitation Training Program Deferment Request
  • Unemployment Deferment Request
  • Economic Hardship Deferment Request
  • Military Service and Post-Active Duty Student Deferment Request

It sounds like a great deal, but remember – you’re increasing the principal balance of the loan and prolonging the inevitable. Let’s say that you chose to defer your loans. As per MarketWatch, the average undergraduate student comes out with $37,000 in student loan debt. Think the cost of an undergrad degree is a lot? The average cost for a law school student that graduated from a private college is $122,158 according to Forbes. Even more unbelievable is the average Medical School Debt at $189,165 as per Modern Healthcare. Check out our chart below to see the hidden costs associated with deferring your student loan payments. Calculations as per those listed in College Reviews.

Undergraduate Deferment Loan Costs

Total Loan Cost Interest Rate Deferment Period Loan Length Total Debt After Deferment Total Increase in Debt
$37,172 8.25% 12 months 10 years $40,238 $3,066
$37,172 8.25% 24 months 10 years $43,305 $6,133

Graduate Deferment Loan Costs

Total Loan Cost Interest Rate Deferment Period Loan Length Total Debt After Deferment Total Increase in Debt
$140,616 9.50% 12 months 10 years $153,974 $13,358
$140,616 9.50% 24 months 10 years $167,333 $26,717
$161,722 9.50% 12 months 10 years $177,085 $15,363
$192,449 9.50% 24 months 10 years $167,333 $30,727

Forbearance

Financial responsibility starts with taking charge of your financial obligations and developing a sound monthly budget. However, what happens if you unexpectedly lose your job or are unable to work due to medical reasons? You suddenly find yourself in financial hardship and may turn to your student loan provider to seek forbearance options.

Similar to deferment, each loan provider and loan type has a unique set of guidelines to qualify for forbearance. Unlike deferment, forbearance could potentially affect your credit. The guidelines for qualifying for forbearance are different for the federal and private student loan programs, so check with your loan servicers and lenders to determine what forbearance options are available. According to the Federal Student Aid site, there are two types of Forbearance for Federal Student Loans- General and Mandatory.

General Forbearance

According to the government Federal Student Aid site, General Forbearances are used when you cannot make a monthly payment. Direct Loans, FFEL Program loans, and Perkins Loan borrowers qualify for this type of forbearance. Types of General Forbearance as per the Federal Student Aid site.

  • Financial difficulties
  • Medical expenses
  • Change in employment
  • Other reasons acceptable to your loan servicer

Mandatory Forbearance

If you meet the requirements for this type of loan, your loan servicer is required to grant you forbearance. Mandatory forbearance is only provided for 12 months. If you still qualify at the end of the 12-month period, you must resubmit your information. As per the Federal Student Aid site, here are the types of Mandatory Forbearance:

  • Medical or Dental Internship/Residency, National Guard Duty, or Department of Defense Student Loan Repayment Program – (Direct Loans and FFEL Program loans only)
  • Student Loan Debt Burden (Direct Loans, FFEL Program loans, and Perkins Loans)
  • AmeriCorps Forbearance (Direct Loans and FFEL Program loans only)
  • Teacher Loan Forgiveness Forbearance Request) (Direct Loans and FFEL Program loans only)

Once you qualify for forbearance, there may be a time period in which you may need to reapply in order to continue receiving benefits, as well as a maximum time they’re available. Keep making your monthly payments until forbearance is granted by your lender, as a delinquency on your monthly payments can result in a negative hit to your credit score. Just like deferment, most student loans in forbearance will accrue interest which gets capitalized and added to the principal amount of your loan. Therefore, this seemingly attractive option to postpone your monthly payments during an unexpected financial hardship ultimately further enslaves you to your student loans.

Although deferment or forbearance may seem like a tempting option, it isn’t always the best path forward. Making even a partial monthly payment is better than making no payment at all. Watch your budget closely and get creative with the steps you can take to avoid deferment or forbearance.

Refinancing your student loans is another great option to consider, just be sure to find a reputable lender like Education Loan Finance. By consolidating private and federal student loans into one monthly payment, you may be able to reduce your student loan payments enough to help you afford that wedding or down payment on a home.

 

Our Simplest Guide to Student Loan Refinancing

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Young woman reading student loan news
2020-05-22
This Week in Student Loans: May 22

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

  This week in student loans:
what you need to know about student loan debt relief

What you need to know about debt relief on student loans

As there have obviously been some major changes in the world of student loans recent, the Washington Post covers many frequently asked questions in this article, from the details of the Heroes Act to how the new changes affect a variety of borrowers.  

Source: Washington Post

 

college's loan default rate

Why a college's student loan default rate matters

With the extended deadline for "decision day" approaching, this US News & World Report brings to light how a college's default rate, or the average portion of students who default on their student loans, should matter to students who are choosing where to attend college.  

Source: US News & World Report

 

Donors provide students with debt relief

Anonymous donors paid off $8 million in student loans for first-generation grads

According to CBS News, a group of anonymous donors contributed a total of $8 million to pay off college loans for up to 400 first-generation college students who have overcome financial hardships, from homelessness to poverty. The donors are longtime supporters of Students Rising Above (SRA), a Bay Area nonprofit.  

Source: CBS News

 

Student Loan Debt Relief

More relief could be coming for student loan borrowers

While the CARES Act has already suspended federal student loan payments through September 30, 2020, a new bill known as the HEROES Act, passed by the House last Friday, would include additional relief for borrowers with both federal and private student loans, including potentially suspending federal student loans another year through September 30, 2021.  

Source: CNBC

    That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.  
 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Clock representing the time it takes to pay off student loans.
2020-05-21
How Long Does it Take to Pay Off Student Loans?

If you have student loan debt, do you know what your loan term is and how long your payments are expected to last? On average, college graduates think they will have their loans paid off in six years. Is this a realistic expectation to pay off loans that quickly? Here we will show you how long it actually takes people to pay off student loans. And if you are looking for ways to pay them off faster, we have some tips for that as well.     

Loan Terms

The loan term is how long it will take you to repay the loan if you only pay the amount owed each month and do not make any additional payments. For federal student loans, the average loan term on the standard repayment plan is 10 years. However, there are options to increase the loan term up to 30 years, depending on the amount of money owed and what payment plan you choose. Increasing the loan term will cause you to pay more interest over the lifetime of the loan, but may require a smaller payment compared to the standard repayment plan.    

Average Time to Repay Undergraduate Loans

Although the standard loan term is ten years, many people take much longer than that to repay student loans. The average time it takes to repay student loans depends on what degree you obtained, mainly because of the amount of loans taken out. However, it also depends on the income you are earning. If you work in a job that is in your degree field, you may be earning the average income in the sector and be able to pay off your loans in the average amount of time. However, if you are not working in your degree field and your salary is lower than the average salary for that degree, it may take more time to pay off.
  • The average amount of student loan debt for a person who finished some college, but did not obtain a degree is $10,000. The average amount of time it takes to repay the loans is just over 17 years.  
  • For a person who obtained an Associate degree, the average amount of debt is $19,600 and on average it will take just over 18 years to pay off the loans. 
  • For college graduates that earned a Bachelor’s degree they will repay an average of $29,900 in student loan debt and will take approximately 19 years and 7 months to repay the loans. 
 

Average Time to Repay Graduate Loans

Earning a graduate degree takes more time and, of course, more money. The average amount of student loan debt for graduate degrees is $66,000. However, certain degrees require much more than the average amount of loans and, therefore, more time to pay. 
  • Medical school - The average student loan debt for medical graduates in 2019 was $223,700. Because of the high salaries doctors are able to earn after residency it can take an average of 13 years to repay the student loans. 
  • MBA - If you earn an MBA the average student loan debt is $52,600 and can take 22 years and 10 months to repay.
  • Law degree - Obtaining a J.D. may cause you to rack up the average of $134,600 in student loans and it will take an average of 18 years to repay.  
  • Dentist - To become a dentist it will cost an average of $285,184 in student loans and may take 20-25 years to pay off the debt.  
  • Veterinarians - Attending veterinary school can cost an average of $183,014 in student loans. It may take veterinarians longer to repay their student loans than traditional medical colleagues because their average income is much lower at $93,830. It can take 20-25 years to repay the loans. 
 

How to Pay Student Loans Off Early

If seeing these averages makes you panic, don’t worry! Use them as motivation to pay your loans off faster. Here are some ways to accomplish that:   

Student Loan Refinancing 

Refinancing student loans is extremely advantageous for many borrowers because it can save you money on monthly payments and in interest over the life of the loan. Refinancing can also be beneficial to shorten the length of time it takes to pay off your loans and save even more in interest costs. This can be done by obtaining a new loan with a shorter term than your current remaining loan length. Although refinancing to a shorter term length will increase your monthly payment, if you are able to afford the new payment it can be a great financial move for your future. You will be paying your loans off sooner and saving more in interest.     For example:  If you have $30,000 in student loans with a standard 10 year repayment plan and 7% interest rate, your payment would be $348 per month. If you refinance to a 7 year loan and qualify for a 6.48% interest rate, your payment would only increase by $62.00 per month and your loans would be paid off 3 years earlier. You would also save $4,403 in interest!   If you did not want to increase your monthly payment you could still utilize the benefits of refinancing by keeping the same loan term and qualifying for a lower interest rate than your current rate. With the same example as above, if you refinance to a 10 year term loan with a lower interest rate it would still save you $573.00 in interest. Qualifying for an even lower interest rate could save you up to $5,590 in interest.     To see your potential savings, use our student loan refinancing calculator.*   

Make Extra Payments 

No matter what payment plan you have for your student loans, making extra payments can be a beneficial way to shorten the amount of time it takes to pay off your loans, including saving you in interest costs.    

Conclusion

Tackling student loan debt may seem daunting at times, but payments don’t last forever. If it’s your goal to pay your loans off as quickly as possible, hopefully using some of these tips will help you reach that goal. Knowing the average time it takes to pay off loans will allow you to set realistic expectations for your financial goals.   
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.   Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
Chart of rates over time
2020-05-18
Current LIBOR Rate Update: May 2020

This blog provides the most current LIBOR rate data as of May 7, 2020, along with a brief overview of the meaning of LIBOR and how it applies to variable-rate student loans. For more information on how LIBOR affects variable rate loans, read our blog, LIBOR: What It Means for Student Loans.

 

What is LIBOR?

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is a money market interest rate that is considered to be the standard in the interbank Eurodollar market. In short, it is the rate at which international banks are willing to offer Eurodollar deposits to one another. Many variable rate loans and lines of credit, such as mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, base their interest rates on the LIBOR rate.

 

How LIBOR Affects Variable Rate Student Loans

If you have variable-rate student loans, changes to the LIBOR impact the interest rate you’ll pay on the loan throughout your repayment. Private student loans, including refinanced student loans, have interest rates that are tied to an index, such as LIBOR. But that’s not the rate you’ll pay. The lender also adds a margin that is based on your credit – the better your credit, the lower the margin. By adding the LIBOR rate to the margin along with any other fees or charges that may be included, you can determine your annual percentage rate (APR), which is the full cost a lender charges you per year for funds expressed as a percentage. Your APR is the actual amount you pay.

 

LIBOR Maturities

There are seven different maturities for LIBOR, including overnight, one week, one month, two months, three months, six months, and twelve months. The most commonly quoted rate is the three-month U.S. dollar rate. Some student loan companies, including ELFI, adjust their interest rates every quarter based on the three-month LIBOR rate.

 

Current 1 Month LIBOR Rate - May 2020

As of May 7, 2020, the 1 month LIBOR rate is 0.20%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.20% (0.20% + 3.00%=3.20%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 month LIBOR rate over time.

 

(Source: macrotrends.net)

   

Current 3 Month LIBOR Rate - May 2020

As of May 7, 2020, the 3 month LIBOR rate is 0.43%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.43% (0.43% + 3.00%=3.43%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 3 month LIBOR rate over time.

  Chart of 3 Month LIBOR for May 2020 (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Current 6 Month LIBOR Rate - May 2020

As of May 7, 2020, the 6 month LIBOR rate is 0.69%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.69% (0.69% + 3.00%=3.69%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 6 month LIBOR rate over time.

  Chart of 6 Month LIBOR May 2020 (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Current 1 Year LIBOR Rate - May 2020

As of May 7, 2020, the 1 year LIBOR rate is 0.78%. If the lender sets their margin at 3%, your new rate would be 3.78% (0.78% + 3.00%=3.78%). The chart below displays fluctuations in the 1 year LIBOR rate over time.

  Chart of 1 Year LIBOR May 2020 (Source: macrotrends.net)  

Understanding LIBOR

If you are planning to refinance your student loans or take out a personal loan or line of credit, understanding how the LIBOR rate works can help you choose between a fixed or variable-rate loan. Keep in mind that ELFI has some of the lowest student loan refinancing rates available, and you can prequalify in minutes without affecting your credit score.* Keep up with the ELFI blog for monthly updates on the current 1 month, 3 month, 6 month, and 1 year LIBOR rate data.

 
 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.