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Best Apps for Budgeting in College

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Managing money is hard, but budgeting in college? That’s a whole different ballgame. For a lot of students, you have so much to worry about with classes, work, and other involvements that finances often slip your mind. So how do you hold yourself to a budget when you can barely remember to feed yourself dinner? Luckily, we live in an age full of apps to help you get a jumpstart on budgeting and money management. Here are a few of our favorites.

 

Mint®. Mint is a free mobile app where you can view all of your banking accounts in the same place. It automatically updates and puts your transactions into categories so you can see where all your money is going – and where it’s coming from. It also recommends changes to your budget that could help you save money. Its features include a bill payment tracker, a budget tracker, alerts, budget categorization, investments, and security features.

 

PocketGuard®. Like Mint, PocketGuard allows you to link your credit cards, checking, and savings accounts, investments and loans to view them all in one place. It automatically updates and categorizes your transactions so you can see real-time changes. PocketGuard also has an “In My Pocket” feature that shows you how much spending money you have remaining after you’ve paid bills and set some funds aside. You can set your financial goals, and this clever app will even create a budget for you.

 

Wally®. This personal finance app is available for the iPhone, with a Wally+ version available for Android users. Like other apps on this list, it allows you to manage all of your accounts in one place and learn from your spending habits. You can plan and budget your finances by looking at your patterns, upcoming payments and expenses, and make lists for your expected spending.

 

MoneyStrands®. Once again, with this app, you’ll have access to all the accounts you connect. Its features allow you to analyze your expenses and cash flow, become a part of a community, track and plan for spending, create budgets and savings goals, and know what you can spend without going over budget.

 

Albert®. A unique feature that Albert emphasizes is its alert system. When you’re at risk for overspending, the app will send you an alert. The app also sends you real-time alerts when bills are due. Enjoy a smart savings feature, guided investing, and the overall ability to visualize your money’s flow and create a personalized budget.

 

Before you download any budgeting app, make sure you check out the reviews and ensure it’s legitimate. Because a lot of apps ask for your personal financial information, it’s essential you verify their legitimacy before entering your account number. Listen to what other people have to say and then choose the option that works best for you, because not every app will be perfect for everyone. Budgeting in college may be hard, but downloading an app is just one way you can make it easier. Maybe you don’t want to use an app at all. If you’re in that boat, you can check out some other approaches to budgeting here or here.

 

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

Tour These 6 Stunning College Campuses in the Eastern US From Your Couch

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If you’re like us, you have a deep appreciation for college campuses – literally any college campus. When you stop to think about it, they’re so much more than just institutions of higher learning. Often, they’re the most aesthetically-pleasing, historical, and lively landmarks within a city. We’ve partnered with the team at eCampus Tours to highlight 5 stunning college campuses you can discover right from your couch. Let’s a take a look at our favorites from the Eastern US.

 

Princeton University 

This Ivy-league standout needs no introduction. Established in 1746 and known for its high academic standards and even higher achieving students, you can experience everywhere from Firestone Library and McCosh Courtyard to Rockefeller College Common Room and Carl Icahn Laboratory without worrying about finding a parking spot. Tour here.

 

 

University of Florida

Start at the Century Tower and traverse your way to the 90 thousand-plus seating found in Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. The Plaza of the Americas is a well-known campus spot where you can see students lining up for Krishna Lunch, slacklining or lounging around in hammocks in-between classes. Tour here.

 

 

Temple University

This college campus tour begins in the The Liacouras Center Sports & Entertainment Complex, home to championship Owls athletics, and where everything from concerts to wrestling matches are hosted. Take a stroll through the brick-lined Founder’s Garden and experience the bustling Shops on Liacouras Walk. Tour here. 

 

 

College of Charleston

This liberal arts and sciences university sits in the heart of historic Charleston, and though many of the Greek Revival and Federal-style buildings look like remnants from the past, it provides students with cutting-edge technology and modern curriculum. The tour begins at Sottile House and College Greenway, showcasing the school’s vine-clad fences and meticulously-maintained lawns. Other highlights include the Cistern and impressive Addlestone Library Rotunda. Tour here.

 

 

University of Kentucky

Established in 1865 in the heart of the Bluegrass State, the University of Kentucky is a campus steeped in tradition as much as academics. From the main quad (known as the Quadrangle) and Memorial Hall, which honors casualties of WWI to Maxwell Place, home to the university President, the comprehensive e-tour provides an accurate snapshot of this university’s unbridled spirit. If you can’t make a trip to Rupp Arena, home to Wildcat athletics, an eCampus Tour is the next best thing. Tour here. 

 

 

Colgate University

This prestigious private liberal arts college in Hamilton, New York was founded in 1819. With a student population that’s about the same size as the city’s population (just under 3,000 students), this university is known for its sense of community. Nearly half of upperclassmen are involved in Greek Life, and games are often played outside of the Academic Quad. A more modern addition to the campus, the Little Hall Art and History building is home to art made by students in their classes. Colgate’s Seven Oaks Golf Course is ranked among the top five college courses in the country by Golf Digest. Tour here.

 

Whether you’re a rising high school senior still scoping out where to spend your college years, or like us, and appreciate everything a vibrant college campus brings to a community, we think you’ll find the over 1,300 tours on eCampus Tours well worth the visit. 

 

Note: Links to other websites are provided as a convenience only. A link does not imply SouthEast Bank’s sponsorship or approval of any other site. SouthEast Bank does not control the content of these sites.

Tips for Choosing a College

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Choosing a college to attend is not an easy task, and there are many factors to consider when making your pick. Should you go to your parents’ alma mater? What about the one with the best student life or athletic teams? Prestige certainly is a factor for many students. When all is said and done you want to pick one that sets you up for success in your career and provides and opportunity to thrive – whether it be by practicing your passions or helps you grow as an individual. Whatever the reason, these tips will make choosing a college much easier.

 

Start by making a thorough list of schools.

By making a list of schools that you are interested in attending, you’re giving yourself a starting point for deciding which are worth taking next steps with. Decide which ones you would like to see in person and which stand out as your ideal schools. If you’re having trouble at this stage, try picking a few that are far different from each other – whether they’re small, large, in the city, in the country, private, public, etc. Deciding the type of school you want to attend is a good first step.

 

Do you research on each school before you visit.

Doing research before you visit will allow you to develop expectations for the school. These expectations can then be compared to what you experience when you visit, giving you a more thorough impression of the school. You can look through brochures and the school website, but also be sure to check around online for various ratings and reviews from past students. As always, double check your sources.

 

Take notes when you visit.

Visiting colleges is fun, so sometimes its easy to forget whether a school meets the criteria you set forth when you’re taking a tour. Bringing a notepad for this very reason can be very effective at allowing you to review the schools after visiting – especially if you plan to visit multiple schools. This way you won’t mix up any information. Then, you can refer to these notes when deciding where you want to apply.

 

Find other members from the campus to help you decide.

When you start narrowing your list of schools down further, start contacting other sources that can help you get more information about the school. While it may seem like a bother, talking to the admissions officer, professors and current students is the best way to get a true feel for what to expect from a school. Students are the most likely to give you unbiased answers.

 

Take your own tour in addition to the admissions tour.

The admissions tour is beneficial, but viewing the campus on your own will give you the chance to see the whole campus in a scope more similar to what students experience. View the parking facilities, actual classrooms, and areas that would pertain to your major (if you know your major prospective major).

 

Don’t forget to ask questions.

You may want to prepare a list of questions to ask beforehand just to make sure that you don’t forget anything. Ask questions regarding academic, financial, housing/food, social, community, athletic, and safety aspects.

 

For more information about visiting college campuses, read The Campus Visit and Making the Most Of the Campus Visit. Remember, if you can’t visit a campus in person, you can always take a virtual tour of the school.

 


 

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments. 

Private Student Loans vs. Government Student Loans: What’s the Difference?

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If you are looking forward to going to college and you know you need financial help, you may not give much thought to whether you should take out private student loans or federal student loans. Either way, you will end up with debt, right? The truth is, deciding between private and federal government student loans is not as simple as comparing apples to apples. Your financial future could be affected by your understanding of how these loans differ.

 

Government Student Loans

Federal loans for students are made by the Federal Government’s Department of Education. When you apply for this type of loan, you must submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. The information on this form will be used to determine i) how much federal student aid and what types of federal loans you qualify for and ii) your family’s contribution toward the cost of your education. 

 

Private Student Loans

Any loans that are not issued by the federal government are defined as private student loans. Private loans are made by various types of lenders, including banks, credit unions, and lenders that specialize in loans to students. If you don’t meet the criteria set by the lender, you can still get a private loan, but you will need a co-signer who meets the lender’s requirements. In the event that you miss payments or default on the loan, your co-signer will be responsible for your debt.

 

The Difference in Interest Rates

  • Government Student Loans – Interest rates on federal loans do not depend on financial factors such as your or your co-signer’s credit rating and are therefore the same for each borrower. Also, the rate on newly originated Federal Direct Loans does not change throughout the repayment period. Currently, interest rates on federal student loans are based on the 10-year Treasury Note plus a fixed percentage increase depending on the loan type, with a cap set depending on the loan type. For example, direct undergraduate loans are based on the 10-year Treasury Note + 2.05% and are capped at 9.50%, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Student loan rates are set in the spring for each new school year, and they are effective from July 1 to June 30 of the following year. 

 

  • Private Student Loans – Interest rates on these loans are set by the lenders and are based on various underwriting criteria including the credit history of you or your co-signer. This means that you may be able to qualify for private student loan interest rates that are lower than government loan interest rates. Additionally, you could be offered a private loan with a variable interest rate rather than a fixed interest rate. Although a variable rate means your rate may go up when you are repaying your loan, the rate could still beat what you would be paying if you had federal loans.

 

The Difference in Repayment Terms

  • Government Student Loans – The repayment terms for federal student loans depend on whether they are subsidized or unsubsidized. Subsidized loans are ideal because the federal government will cover the interest while you are finishing school or in deferment, whereas unsubsidized loans begin accruing interest as soon as they are taken out. Federal student loans also offer options of deferment and forbearance as well as income-driven repayment plans, making these types of loans slightly more accommodating if you may have trouble paying your student loans.   

 

  • Private Student Loans – Private student loans come with different repayment plans depending on the lender. A private student loan from ELFI gives you a choice of several attractive repayment options including deferring repayment until six months after graduation. With terms ranging from 5-15 years, you can choose between having lower monthly payments or paying off your loans quicker.*

 

The Difference in How Much You Can Borrow

  • Government Student Loans – The government sets a cap on how much you are allowed to borrow both for each year of college and cumulatively.

 

  • Private Student Loans – At ELFI, we encourage all individuals to explore all scholarship and grant options available. We always advise potential students to go after the “free money” first, as there are thousands of scholarships and grants you can take advantage of each year.

    After taking advantage of scholarships and grants, the full cost of your education may not be entirely covered. The next step is to look into Private Student Loan options to cover the remaining amount you need for your education expenses. If you have reached your limit with respect to federal loans, you can also make up the difference with private loans. Private student loans from ELFI can help to bridge the gap.*

 

Choosing Between Government Student Loans and Private Student Loans

It’s important that you consider all of the differences when deciding which types of loans are best for you. If you need assistance in working through your options, contact ELFI. We have years of experience devoted to helping students realize their college dreams, so don’t wait – give us a call today.*

 


*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites

Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

FAFSA 101: What You Need to Know About Paying for College (Video)

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If you plan to enroll in higher education, you’re probably giving some thought to financial aid. Completing the FAFSA will help you earn the federal financial assistance you need and deserve. If you’re already in college, you likely filled out the FAFSA without giving much thought about what it meant, and what it means for you each year that you apply for federal student aid. This video breaks down the process of applying for federal student aid and explains why it’s necessary to do so – so you can feel a bit better about filling it out each year!

FAFSA 101 Video

 

For more information on the FAFSA, check out our blog, “What is FAFSA? And Why You Should Care“. Subscribe to our YouTube channel or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or LinkedIn for more videos about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.

 

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Adulting Tips: 8 Resume Keys to Help you Score that Next Job

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Whether you are in the process of heading off to college, or you are graduated and looking to continue your path to financial freedom through student loan refinancing – the work ethic you developed to get into and through school will be a major part of your continued success. But as you enter or progress through your career, the way you present yourself holds even more weight. It’s time to start thinking of your personal brand.

Your resume is a key component of how your personal brand comes across to employers. It’s your first opportunity to impress hiring managers and will determine whether you get that in-person interview. For these reasons, it’s essential that is promotes you in the best light possible. Follow these steps (and avoid these mistakes) to achieve the perfect resume.

 

1. Customize it.

Submitting a vague, boring resume is a sure way to get yours moved to the bottom of the stack, or out of the pile altogether. No matter where you are in your career path, whether looking for a part-time job in high school, an internship in college, or applying for a job after school, you should always take the time to customize your resume to the job you’re applying for (check out Huffington Post’s tips for customizing your resume). But remember, a little goes a long way here.

 

2. What does your email address say about you? 

Your prospective employer shouldn’t look at your resume and think “this person is cool.” In fact, you probably don’t even want them thinking twice about it. You should always avoid email addresses that use nicknames, profanity, or have humorous connotations. Use a simple email address that consists of variations of your first, middle, and last name. We love the tips on creating a professional email address from Hubspot.

 

3. Organize it.

You want the employer’s eyes to be drawn to the most important parts of your resume – so be sure to highlight them and make them prominent. If you’re fresh out of school with no work experience, highlight your academic accomplishments; if you didn’t have a great GPA in school but have good work experience, highlight the experience first. Know what your selling point is and prioritize it over your supporting facts.

 

4. Don’t be passive or lazy in your use of language.

Showing laziness in your resume? A recipe for unemployment. Be sure to explain your duties at each job, and don’t sell yourself short. Even if two jobs are similar in nature, be sure to express how the experiences were different because it will exemplify some versatility. Using statements like: “same as above” and “etc.” when writing your resume shows poor effort and undersells your experience. 

 

5. Choose the right font.

Be sophisticated, not flashy. Choose a standard font that will be readable by the hiring manager on their phone, laptop, tablet, or any operating system. Your resume may be scanned by automated applicant tracking software, so using a basic font is probably best. Some common examples of “resume-safe” fonts are:

  • Calibri
  • Arial
  • Garamond
  • Georgia
  • Helvetica

Check out some more tips on choosing font size and weight from Indeed.

 

6. Show that you are detail oriented. 

Typos and other errors are one of the most common blunders that would cause a hiring manager to discard a resume. Submitting a resume that has typos only confirms that your attention to detail is lacking. Don’t be that person. Just like your credit score can reflect your attention to detail in your personal finances as you seek out student loans or to refinance student loans, your resume is that short summary of your professional experience. Don’t let a typo drop your score with your future employer. 

 

7. Why you? 

Most importantly you want to make an impact on a hiring manager. You need to put emphasis on your accomplishments. Think of instances where you achieved success at previous jobs, on classroom projects, or during extracurricular activities. Your goal is to demonstrate measurable successes to the greatest extent possible. Maybe you were you able to help a previous employer increase revenue by 10%. Or you created marketing campaigns in your college courses that five actual companies were able to use and implement. Or you organized a fundraising event that raised funds for a charity in your community. For some inspiration, here’s JobScan’s list of examples of accomplishments you can put on your resume.

 

8. Algorithms are everywhere.

Many employers use electronic databases to store applicant resumes, and scanning tools are programmed to look for key terms in your resume. Using the right keywords may help you get noticed and earn an interview. Use the job posting or description to help you determine which keywords, such as specialized degrees, languages, skills, etc, to include on your resume.

We hope this Adulting Tip lets helps you score that next big career move. Education Loan Finance is here to help you along your financial journey from funding your college career to refinancing student loans – we want to empower your path to financial freedom.*

 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites

Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

What I Would Have Told Myself in College: Barbara Thomas

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Barbara Thomas, Executive Vice President of Education Loan Finance (ELFI) provides some financial advice to college students based on her own experiences in college.

 

Hello, I’m Barbara Thomas. For most, like me, my college days were a great experience that led to incredible personal growth. I had a marvelous sense of freedom and made many new friends. However, I have spent much time reflecting on what I would do differently if I could begin my college life all over again, given what I know now. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, isn’t it? So here’s my advice to all of you who are preparing to enter college, or are currently in your freshman or sophomore years.

Choose an Affordable College

When looking for the right college, don’t get beguiled by a famous name and a beautiful campus. And, while a state-of-the-art fitness center or an Olympic-size swimming pool might be important if you’re an athlete, most of the time you will be paying for them in higher college fees. Instead, make sure to keep your eyes on finances, as affordability should be a top concern. Considering the fact that many students end up taking on sizeable student loan debt, keep in mind that you (most likely) won’t be living on that beautiful campus in your late 20s or 30s.

Rethink Your Path to the Best Education.

Just because a college is more expensive, doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s better than one that costs less. You should look upon college as an investment in your future. Consider what the return on investment (ROI) from your college education will look like. In other words, analyze which college is likely to provide you with the most bang for your buck. Here’s a report from U.S. News & World Report that gives you the ROI of different colleges.

Look at Alternatives to a Four-Year College.

If you find out that college is not the best path for you, it can turn out to be an expensive mistake. Keep in mind that dropping out of college won’t make your student loans disappear. So before you enroll in a college, consider these alternatives:

  • Take a gap year to earn money to put toward going to college and give yourself more time to decide what you want to do.
  • Consider attending a trade school to learn a valuable skill with high earnings potential.
  • Spend two years at a community college. Attending a community college can help you save on tuition. However, if you plan to transfer to a college of your choice, be sure to do some checking. Find out how many transfer students are accepted and how many of your community college credits can be used.

Do your research and crunch the numbers to make sure you’re making the best choice.

Earn More While in School

A survey of millennials found that earning money while in college was the number one thing that participants wished they had done (or done more of). This reflects the increasing financial cost that goes along with obtaining a college degree. The College Board estimated that in 2017 (updated figures are available), the average student loan debt upon graduation was $28,500. Keep in mind that a heavy debt load is going to affect your financial future – your ability to buy a home, start a family, and save for retirement. Apart from financial considerations, there is no better way to acquire real job skills than to hold down a job and learn about its demands firsthand. Employers know this, which is why previous work experience is the most popular measure to assess job candidates, even those straight out of college.

Research Ways To Lower Your Monthly Student Loan Payments

So, you’ve done everything right – you chose the higher education path that was right for you, and you have landed an interesting job. Now, what about those student loan payments? Are they weighing you down and preventing you from leading the life that you had envisioned after college? ELFI has a solution to your problem – it’s called refinancing. You can close out your original loan and take out a new one with a lower interest rate and/or a longer term. This can significantly lower your monthly loan payments. Get in touch with us to see how we can help you!

 

Learn More About Student Loan Refinancing With ELFI

 

Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.

What is FAFSA? And Why You Should Care

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What does FAFSA stand for? FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid. You must submit the FAFSA to apply for federal and state financial aid to see you through college, and it must be submitted every year that you want financial assistance. Even if you don’t need federal financial aid, college admissions officers recommend that you complete the FAFSA process. Also, some private scholarships require the submission of the FAFSA. In both instances, this is because the application indicates your interest in the school and can boost your chances of getting in. Each school that you have listed on the FAFSA will receive your financial information after you’ve completed the form.

 

How do I Get a FAFSA?

The FAFSA paperwork is available in both a printed and online format. Most families find it more convenient to complete the FAFSA online these days – to do so, go to www.fafsa.ed.gov. Here you will find pre-application worksheets and step-by-step instructions for filling out the FAFSA. You can sign your completed form electronically with a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID that can be obtained by going to this link. You can even opt to file your FAFSA from your mobile device.

There are the following advantages to completing the FAFSA process online:

  • You’ll likely receive your Student Aid Report (SAR) quicker than if you had used the paper or PDF forms.
  • Your FAFSA will be less prone to mistakes because the online process comes with built-in error checks.
  • The expenses of the federal government will be lowered as its processing costs are reduced.
  • With the online FAFSA, you can list up to ten colleges; the paper version only has space for four. You should list all of the schools you’re interested in whether or not you’ve applied or been accepted yet. 

 

School Codes

Each school has a six-character Federal School Code (also known as a Title IV Institution Code) that you need to enter into your FAFSA. Be aware that some institutions have several codes to designate different campuses or programs. You can obtain a code by using this search form or calling the school’s financial aid office. 

 

Paper FAFSAs

Paper versions are no longer distributed in bulk to high schools, libraries, and colleges, except in areas where students may not have access to the Internet. However, if you want a paper version, you can order up to three copies by calling 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3242) or 1-391-337-5665. (Those with hearing impairments should call 1-800-730-8913.)

 

Expected Family Contribution (EFC)

Your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is a number that colleges use to calculate the amount of financial aid you’re eligible to receive. The EFC takes into account various factors such as your family’s income, assets, size, and any other family members who are attending college at the same time as yourself. Usually, a lower EFC increases your eligibility for more financial aid. Use a handy EFC Calculator, such as the one from FinAid to calculate your EFC and receive an estimate of your eligibility for financial assistance. You can also run “what-if” tests to find out how much assistance you’ll receive under various scenarios.

 

When Should I Submit my FAFSA?

The FAFSA is available on October 1 of the year before you plan to attend school. Applications are considered on a rolling basis up until a summer deadline (which varies). Earlier dates may apply to state and school-specific aid programs. Don’t wait until the deadline; the earlier you submit your application, the more aid programs you’ll be in line for.

 

So What Does This All Mean?

If you’re planning on enrolling in higher education, you’re probably giving some thought to financial aid. Completing the FAFSA will help you earn the federal financial assistance you need and deserve. For a very detailed guide to filling out your FAFSA, click here. And, don’t forget that help may be available from an advisor at your school. 

 

After college, if you want help and advice on managing your student loan debt, talk to ELFI. Give us a call at 1.844.601.ELFI to speak with a dedicated Personal Loan Advisor.

 

 

Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites

Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Top 10 SAT Resource Publications for Students

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Preparing to head off to college in the next year or two? If so, are you stressing out about the SAT? Colleges use SAT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships. The SAT has three parts: reading, writing, and math. Studying for the SAT can help familiarize you with what the test looks like, develop relevant strategies and skills, and prepare you to achieve a high score. Here’s a list of self-guided prep books that can help you prepare for the SATs.

  1. The Official SAT Study Guide – The College Board. Pages: 1,145; Price: $19.01-$19.36The Official SAT Study Guide is a publication of The College Board, the organization that creates and administers the SAT. It includes eight practice tests that are similar to the exam. Each of these tests is available as a free, downloadable PDF on The College Board’s website. In addition to the tests, the book has an additional 250 pages of instruction, guidance, and test information. This volume should form the basis of your self-guided SAT studying program.
  2. SAT Prep Black Book: The Most Effective SAT Strategies Ever Published – Mike Barrett and Patrick Barrett. Pages: 575; Price: $24.50-$28.49SAT Prep Black Book deserves a place on your bookshelf right next to The Official SAT Study Guide. The book is authored by an SAT tutor who has guided many students in preparation for the test. Readers will learn how to use the ins and outs of the SAT to their advantage. It includes a walkthrough of more than 600 official SAT questions. The publication is written in a conversational style and is full of understandable advice for doing well on the SAT.
  3. The Complete Guide to SAT Reading – Erica Meltzer. Pages: 349; Price: $29.19-$33.20The Complete Guide to SAT Reading is a comprehensive review of the reading skills required to achieve high scores on the reading section of the SAT. The author is an experienced SAT tutor who provides breakdowns of SAT Reading types of questions. She gives in-depth explanations and numerous examples of how to effectively work through every kind of problem. This book offers helpful guidance for your SAT prep, no matter your level of reading skills.
  4. SAT Vocabulary: A New Approach – Erica Meltzer and Larry Krieger. Pages: 133; Price: $17.99-$18.95SAT Vocabulary covers critical vocabulary for the reading, writing and language, and essay sections of the SAT. Rather than just providing long lists of words and their meanings to memorize, the book teaches you to understand the various contexts in which vocabulary is tested. You can then test yourself by applying what you have learned with practice exercises.
  5. The College Panda’s SAT Essay: The Battle-tested Guide for the New 2016 Essay – Nielson Phu. Pages: 64; Price: $18.99-$21.52Nielson Phu is a teacher who achieved a perfect SAT score when he took the new SAT in 2016. A copy of his high-scoring essay is included in The College Panda’s SAT Essay. And, amazingly, Phu states that he’s not a naturally gifted writer. In this book, you’ll find Phu’s tips, strategies, and resources to enable you to score well on the SAT essay, even if you don’t think you’re a “good” writer. This short book is worth reading cover-to-cover.
  6. The College Panda’s SAT Writing: Advanced Guide and Workbook for the New SAT – Nielson Phu. Pages: 270; Price: $10.29-$28.49Nielson Phu loves to write books to help students achieve a perfect SAT score. Don’t be intimidated, though – The College Panda’s SAT Writing provides comprehensive coverage of what you need to know to do well in the SAT writing and language section. It gives clear explanations of every grammar rule tested on the SAT, from the most basic to the most obscure. It also includes hundreds of examples, drills, and practice questions. To make the study of grammar less boring, Phu has even added in some fun illustrations.
  7. The College Panda’s SAT Math: Advanced Guide and Workbook for the New SAT – Nielson Phu. Pages: 254; Price: $22-$28.49The College Panda’s SAT Math is a comprehensive guide to the SAT Math section. This publication is aimed at the student reaching for a perfect score, and, in pursuit of this goal, it leaves no stone unturned. The book has clear explanations of the math concepts tested on the SAT, ranging from the simplest to the most complex. It also provides hundreds of examples, over 500 practice questions, and lists of the most common mistakes students make. Even if you don’t think you can achieve that perfect score, this book is an excellent way to brush up on your math skills.
  8. Bring Home the Score: A Private Tutor’s Guide to Scoring in the Highest Echelons of the SAT, ACT, SHSAT, GRE, GMAT, LSAT, NCLEX, MCAT, or Any Other Standardized Test – Walter Tinsley. Pages: 86; Price: $9.96-$9.97Don’t be put off by the lengthy subtitle of Bring Home the Score even if you have to look up what “echelon” means. This volume is jam-packed with tips, tricks, and strategies to land you among the top scorers on any standardized test – including the SAT. You will learn mental strategies to improve your motivation and avoid burnout from an overly aggressive study regimen. Bring Home the Score can help you create a schedule that’s intense but manageable.
  9. Solve. Create: The Insider’s Guide to the ACT and SAT –
    Scott Moser. Pages: 523; Price: $19.68-$29.95People don’t usually think that standardized tests and creativity go together. The author of this book, a private test prep tutor, bases his strategy of success in the SAT on individualization and process rather than focusing on rote memorization. Reason. Solve. Create. aims to help the reader become a better thinker. For example, the same reasoning skills that are used in writing a poem can also be applied to solving a math problem or correcting a mistake in grammar. Information pertaining only to the SAT is clearly marked.
  10. The Perfect Score Project: One Mother’s Journey to Uncover the Secrets of the SAT – Debbie Stier. Pages: 288; Price: $6.45-$16.45The Perfect Score Project is not a traditional SAT prep book but provides an interesting and insightful read for both students and parents. Debbie Stier, a single mother and an author, wanted to help her son prepare for the SAT. To this end, she took the test seven times in one year. She also studied every way possible to prep for the test. The result is a book with tried-and-tested answers to every SAT question a student might be asking themselves: When do I begin? Do I really need test prep with a big name? Do I need a tutor, a class, or can I self-study? What’s the one thing I need to know? Stier’s son did well on the SAT, and so can you.

 

All of these books can be purchased online, and the prices are for new and used books as advertised at the time (June 1, 2019) of this writing. The number of pages is approximate and is based on the table of contents for each book.

What You Need to Know About College Scholarships

 

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the web sites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

How to Build Credit While in College

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As a child, it’s not uncommon to think that there are monsters hiding under your bed or maybe in your closet. You never actually think it through as to what really could be hiding but it’s something scary. Trust me, you didn’t want to ever have to come face-to-face with it. Thus, my reasoning for staying in bed every night and never moving. Oh, and of course hiding my arms under the blankets. You know you did it too! Well, at twenty-eight I think I’ve finally met those monsters.  It was my credit!

Throughout my life, I was terrified of credit. I, like many others, was taught credit cards lead to lifelong debt and it could ruin my life. Not only that but any minor change like closing a credit card account affected my credit score – SCARY! Credit, like most new things in life can be intimidating or maybe even scary, but we have to start somewhere.

What most people, myself included, don’t understand about credit is that it can be a great thing when used responsibly. A good credit score can help with getting a house or buying a car. I now understand that credit is not a scary thing. Credit is only something you need to be responsible with. If you are a college student looking to build credit purchase only things that you can pay for. If you cannot guarantee that you can stay on top of payments, you shouldn’t be making purchases.

While in college, if you decide to build credit it can help jump-start your life after college. Filling out applications with your credit score will be easy because you’ve already started building credit.  In college, credit can be built through everyday expenses and can benefit you in the long run. Here are some simple ways of building credit that will not break the bank or “ruin your life,” but help you in the future.

Find a Credit Card

While in college, you may see a credit card offer dropped in your mailbox every week. Actually reading through the information and what the card offers is KEY. Look at interest rates and cash back rewards. Some cards have cash back rewards on points earned by using the card on things such as gas and groceries. By using a credit card for necessities and paying it off, you are earning easy credit while still in college.

Some cards offer cash back opportunities on travel. If you’re going away to college, using a credit card could be a great way to earn points for a visit back home or a weekend getaway. Remember, use a credit card on things you will be able to pay back on time. This way you will be building credit while also gaining reward points to redeem on things you want to do.

If you’re attending college you may want to check out student credit cards. Student credit cards can be a really great way to start building credit while you are in school. Be warned that you will still need to demonstrate a decent salary to qualify for a student credit card, simply being a student is not enough. Most student credit cards will not charge an annual fee and many offer additional perks.

 

Learn How Completing College Early Can Save You Money

 

Secure Credit Cards

If you don’t qualify for a student credit card or any traditional credit card because you don’t have a credit history look into secure credit cards. They work just like other credit cards but require a cash deposit, first. This deposit is usually in the hundreds or low thousands. If you make every payment in full and on time you’ll receive back your down payment. If you do not make payments on time or in full the lender keeps your down payment.

Rent

While being in college you will likely be moving into your FIRST apartment. An apartment can be a great way to start earning credit. Putting the rent in your name and paying it on time can assist in building credit. In order for rent to go towards your credit history, your landlord must be reporting the rent payments to one of the credit agencies. If your landlord isn’t reporting your rental payments it will not help you to build a credit history. In today’s society, it is also pretty uncommon for landlords to report rent payments to a credit agency.

If your landlord isn’t reporting your rent payments to a credit agency it can’t hurt to ask if they could start! When sharing an apartment with roommates, it is vital for everyone living there to pay their share of rent on time. Finding roommates that share accountability is important when you are building a good credit score.

Get a Credit Builder Loan

A loan that is in place to IMPROVE CREDIT?! Sign me up! When you have a credit builder loan, you make payments into your savings account. After one year, you will get the amount you paid back and increase your credit score! A credit builder loan does not require good credit to begin, you just have to show proof of income. Start by applying for a credit builder loan, and begin to make payments on time. In order for you to be benefiting from a credit builder loan, you must be paying on time. The pros to a credit builder loan include getting the money you put in and having a better credit score at the end of the year!

Become an Authorized User

Becoming an authorized user is a smart and easy way to embark on creating credit while in college. Being an authorized user means that you can use another person’s credit card and your name will be included on the account. The process simply has the account user add your name to the credit card account. As an authorized user, you will not be responsible for paying back debts on the credit card. This responsibility will legally be in the original account holder’s name. The main goal for being an authorized user is to increase your credit score by having an account holder with an outstanding credit history. If you have an account holder who is known for paying their debt on time, this will increase your score, because you’re on the account. Keep in mind that you should ask someone who is trusted and reliable when becoming an authorized user.

Start on Student Loan Payments

As a former college student, I know that going to school full time while working enough to have money to start paying off student loans can seem impossible. Remember, you do not have to pay off large amounts right away. While in college, consider putting money aside to start paying off loans when you can.

If you start loan payments early you will start to see positive growth on your credit score. The benefits of having student loans include helping build your credit score. If you decide to start paying off loans while in school, it will be before your loan deadline and will create less to pay off later. Even if you are not able to pay off large sums, these small amounts can make for fewer payments later on and a better credit score when you graduate from college.

Credit Utilization

A top way to build credit is not to utilize all the credit that is available to you. For example, if you have a credit card with a credit limit of $2,500 and the balance is $2,500 that would be 100% credit utilization. Credit utilization is important because it impacts your credit score. The maximum recommended credit utilization is about 30%. Therefore, if your credit card had a maximum limit of $2,500 then 30% of that would be $750. In this example, to avoid negatively impacting your credit score you should not spend over $750 on your credit card.

It can be difficult to be disciplined as a college student, but it’s important to remember that this money is not free. It’s also likely that this is probably your first credit card ever! Exciting, but this is a really important rule of thumb! This is a credit that you will eventually need to pay back. In an effort to build credit you want to be sure you’re creating good financial habits for yourself too. Be sure to stay disciplined and not utilize over 30% of your credit card.

BONUS: Credit Reports

While we are on the topic of creating good financial habits, the number one habit you can create is looking at your credit report. If you talk with any financial expert, this will be their number one piece of advice! Yearly, check your credit score and your credit report. Think about it like an annual physical at the doctor, but for your finances. Review your credit report to make sure that there are no errors or fraud to your credit history. If you visit AnnualCreditReport.com you can receive a free credit report from all three major credit agencies in the U.S. and a free credit report can be requested every 12 months.

Having paid off debt or using credit in college will prepare you for future payments on cars, houses, and throughout your adult life. Knowing your responsibilities and taking care of payments on time is key to achieving a better credit score by the end of your college career. Consider these options when deciding how to build credit and choose one that will benefit you in the long run.

 

Are Student Loans Impacting Your Credit Score?

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.