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Should You Save for Your Child’s College Fund or Pay Your Student Loans?

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As you start to grow your family, you may be wondering whether you should continue to aggressively pay down your student loans or start saving for your little bundle of joy’s college fund. Do you immediately set up a 529 to start saving for their college expenses? Or should you focus on paying your student loans before saving for your kid’s college? Here is some information to consider before you decide.

 

For the 2018-2019 school year, families spent an average of $26,226 on college. With tuition rates and the cost of living increasing, higher education can be an expensive endeavor to undertake. In 2019, 64% of families planned to pay for college by saving, according to Sallie Mae’s “How America Pays for College 2019 Study”

 

With all this in mind, you may think it’s a good idea to start saving for your child to attend college when they are a newborn. Perhaps the heavy burden of your student loans is something you want your child to avoid. However, it’s important to consider some factors:

 

Do you have a healthy retirement account?

Financial experts will argue you should not save for your child’s college expenses if it prevents you from saving for your retirement. The argument is based on the fact that you can’t borrow for your living expenses in retirement, but your child can borrow for school costs. If you wait to save for retirement after sending your child off to school with their tuition saved for, you will be missing out on vital years of compounding. Saving for retirement early can earn you thousands of dollars more than if you were to start saving later!

 

What do your other debt payments look like?

Is your financial situation stable enough to be able to pay tuition or save for future tuition costs? To determine this you should consider what debt (including your student loans) you have. Are you able to make all your debt payments? Do you have an emergency fund you are contributing to? If you have unpaid debts or don’t have an emergency fund, you may need to delay saving for future college expenses at this time. 

 

Can you afford tuition payments or monthly college savings in your budget?

If saving for your child’s college expenses is a priority for you, plan for it in your budget. If you are able to continue making your own student loan payments, save for retirement, and continue to build an emergency fund while saving for your child’s college expenses, go for it! Ready to make a budget, but not sure how? Check out this budgeting method

 

Options to Consider 

If you want to help with your child’s college expenses but it’s not financially feasible at this time, here are some ways you may still be able to help:

  • Refinance your student loans. If you are trying to save some money in your budget for your child’s college expenses consider refinancing your student loans. Refinancing allows you to obtain a new loan, presumably at a lower interest rate, to pay off your old loan. The new loan with a lower interest rate can result in significant savings for your monthly payment and in interest costs over the life of the loan. This monthly savings can go directly into your child’s college savings. To find out how much you may be able to save, check out our student loan refinance calculator.* 
  • Don’t feel bad if saving for your child’s higher education is not something you can afford. In 2019, 50% of families borrowed for college. This figure also includes families who had some savings. Student loans, both federal and private, are an important resource to pay for college expenses. Help your child determine how much they need to borrow and compare their options.     
  • If it’s not in the budget to save for future education expenses start saving any cash gifts your child receives. Take those gifts and open a 529 plan for your child. A 529 is a tax-advantaged investment account that allows you to save for qualified higher education expenses such as tuition and room and board. 

 

Ways to Save on College Costs

When you are deciding how to pay for college expenses, be sure to include your child in the discussion. After all, they will be starting their adult life and should have a good understanding of finances. Here are some points of discussion to get you started:

  1. Can they take Advanced Placement classes or do dual enrollment in high school to earn college credits? Earning college credits while still in high school is significantly less expensive, or possibly free in some cases, and can cut down on the required number of classes when they actually attend college. This can help them graduate early or reduce the amount of tuition you need to pay. 
  2. Is your child considering a private or public college? The type of school they are considering can have a significant impact on the cost. In 2019, the average cost of a private school was $48,510 per year compared to $21,370 for a public college. Though the sticker price for a private college is a lot higher, private schools often have the ability to give more generous financial aid. Before eliminating a potential college due to costs, be sure to look at their financial aid statistics. 
  3. Will they be eligible for any scholarships? There are a number of general and niche scholarships that your child can apply to. College Board’s Scholarship Search is a good resource to find out about scholarship opportunities. Tip: Be sure to fill out the FASFA, which allows you to be eligible to receive aid such as grants, scholarships, work-study and federal student loans. 
  4. Will your child have a job during school to help pay for expenses? A job on campus can be a great way for a college student to be more involved on campus and earn money for their living expenses. 

 

Bottom Line 

The ability to help your child pay for future educational expenses can be a great feeling. But before you take on this endeavor, you’ll want to be sure that your financial situation is stable enough. Armed with this information, you can make an informed decision for how you can successfully pay off your student loans and save for your child’s college expenses.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

How to Plan a Wedding While Paying Student Loans

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By Caroline Farhat

 

Congratulations, you’re engaged! Planning a wedding is an exciting time! From choosing your attire to picking out a venue and decor, there are a lot of decisions to make and many that can be costly. If you’re starting to plan your big day, you might be wondering how you’ll pay all of these extra expenses while still paying your student loan debt and regular bills. Don’t worry, we’ve got your back! Read on for some tips on how to plan a wedding with student loans on your radar.  

 

1. Set Realistic Expectations

A majority of the costs for a wedding are based on the number of guests, so you can save money by keeping your guest list relatively small. For example, if you plan a wedding for 350 people you will most likely need a bigger venue than you would for 100 guests. Venue costs typically account for one-third of ceremony and reception costs so this can be a major budget buster. Food and beverage and wedding favors are also typically charged per person. Because weddings can be expensive and extravagant or budget-friendly and low-key, it’s critical to discuss your desires and budget with your partner before you start planning.

 

Here are some good points to discuss:

  • Parameters for the guest list: Do you want to invite your college roommate you haven’t seen in three years and every cousin on your partner’s side? Or are you looking for a more intimate affair with just your closest family and friends? 
  • Your near-term financial goals (besides the wedding): Are you saving for a down payment for a home? Considering starting a family? Understanding your joint financial goals is a great way to guide your expectations. 
  • Location of the wedding: Agreement on location is key because it will drive all of your other planning. If you’re eyeing a destination wedding and your partner wants a backyard wedding, you will want to understand each other’s individual desires so that you can create a joint wedding that makes both of you happy!

 

2. Set a Budget and Stick to It

Before you plan a budget, it helps to know who will be contributing to the wedding costs. Will you be paying for wedding expenses equally with your partner? Do any family members want to help with costs? This information can help shape your budget.  

 

The average cost of a wedding in 2019 was $28,000 according to The Knot 2019 Real Weddings Survey. This figure only accounts for the ceremony and reception and can vary widely depending on your location. When you add in the average costs of an engagement ring ($5,900), a honeymoon ($5,000), and other wedding events such as the rehearsal dinner, bachelor/bachelorette parties, and engagement parties, the actual wedding costs can be much higher. If these numbers are making you want to elope in Vegas, don’t panic. There are some ways you can try to lower the cost of a wedding: 

  • Going DIY – DIYing at least some elements of the wedding can save you a good chunk of money. If you’re a Pinterest aficionado, try creating your own wedding invitations or centerpieces. Better yet, homemade wedding favors would be extra special for your guests and can save you hundreds of dollars.
  • Barter – Do you have friends that are photographers, florists, musicians, or bartenders? Bartering can help keep your expenses down while still getting the services you need. 
  • Timing – Are you dead set on having a June wedding or are you more flexible? In some areas, the month you pick can have a big impact on cost! Typically, June is a higher cost since it’s considered peak season, while winter weddings tend to be less expensive. Additionally, having your wedding on a Friday or Sunday can save you some money compared to a Saturday wedding. 

 

Tip: It’s important to keep in mind that most wedding vendors do not require full payment upfront. Many vendors require a downpayment to secure their services and final payment closer to the wedding date. Open a separate bank account or flag any money you set aside for final wedding payments so that it doesn’t get used for other expenses that might pop up. 

 

3. Cut Expenses

In the midst of all the wedding costs, it may seem like any money you had leftover at the end of the month is now going towards the wedding. If money gets tight, think of ways to cut expenses: 

  • Refinance your student loans: Refinancing can be a great way to get extra cash now and set you and your partner up for a better financial future. Refinancing can save you on your monthly payment, as well as save you on interest costs over the life of the loan. For example, if you have a $35,000 loan with an 8% interest rate and get approved for an interest rate as low as 3.99% you could be saving up to $70 per month and over $8,000 in interest costs. Check out our student loan refinance calculator to see how much you could be saving.*   
  • Cut cable or cell phone bill: If you still have cable, it’s easier now than ever to cut the cord and still watch the shows and sports you want to see. Still paying a high cell phone bill? Compare carriers and call your existing provider to see if you can lower your bill.  
  • Reduce eating out or other entertainment expenses: It may not seem easy or fun to stop eating out or to cut back on entertainment, but reducing these expenses now could be just what you need to afford the band or DJ you really want at your wedding. 

 

4. Start a Side Hustle

A side hustle is a way you can earn money outside of your day job. The possibilities for a side hustle are endless: You could babysit, walk dogs, pick up a part-time job, etc. The extra money can help pay for your wedding expenses or you could put it towards your future financial goals. Earning extra money is not only helpful during wedding planning when you will experience extra expenses, but it can also help you after the wedding to make additional payments on your student loans, save for a new car or fund a dream trip. 

 

Bottom Line

Planning a wedding with student loans can be a stressful time. Don’t let your student loans be a part of the stress. With realistic expectations and a budget, you can manage to have the wedding of your dreams while still paying down your student loan debt! 

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

10 Most Expensive U.S. Cities to Live In for 2020

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Depending on where you live, your income may not give you as much spending power as you expect. For instance, someone making $100,000 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania will be far more comfortable than someone making $100,000 in Manhattan, New York. 

 

If you’re thinking of moving to a new city, consider the cost of living before committing to relocating. The city’s cost of living can have a big impact on your cash flow and your ability to handle your expenses, including your student loan repayment if you have education debt. 

 

10 Cities with the Highest Cost of Living in the US

To come up with a list of the 10 U.S. cities with the highest cost of living, we looked at information compiled by Kiplinger. In each city, the cost of living is well above the national average and the median home value is over $450,000 — well above the median home value for the nation as a whole. 

 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the annual average wage for all occupations is $51,960. To show you just how expensive each of these cities actually is, we used a cost of living calculator to demonstrate what that salary is worth in each location. For the sake of comparison, we used Atlanta Georgia as the resident’s original city — a city that is right at the national average in terms of cost of living. 

 

Here are the 10 most expensive U.S. cities to live in for 2020: 

 

10. Boston, MA

If you relocated from Atlanta to Boston and earned the national average wage of $51,960, you’d have to get a job that paid at least $75,137 to maintain the same standard of living that you’re accustomed to in Boston. That’s because Boston’s cost of living is 50% higher than the national average. 

 

Boston does have a below-average unemployment rate, increasing your chances of finding and maintaining a job. As of December 2019, the unemployment rate was just 2.1%

 

 

 

9. Queens, NY

If you want to move to the Queens section of New York, you’d have to earn at least $75,387 to have the same spending power as you would with a $51,960 salary in Atlanta. The cost of living in Queens is 52% higher than the national average. In particular, you’ll face a much more competitive housing market. According to Zillow, the median home value in Queens is $531,000 and the median rent price for an apartment is $2,250.  

 

 

 

8. Arlington, VA

Arlington’s proximity to the Pentagon and the nation’s capital makes it a hotspot for government workers and lawyers, and the cost of living reflects that. Its cost of living is 53% above the national average, and the median home value in Arlington is $737,932 — nearly $500.000 more than the national median home value. 

 

If you moved from Atlanta to Arlington, you’d have to earn at least $76,588 to maintain your standard of living. 

 

 

 

7. Oakland, CA

In Oakland, be prepared for sticker shock when it comes to housing. The median home value in Oakland is $765,350. The median rent for apartments is a whopping $3,000. That’s more than three times the national median rent for a one-bedroom apartment. 

 

To have the same spending power in Oakland as you did in Atlanta, you’d have to earn at least $80,193 per year. 

 

 

 

6. Seattle, WA

Seattle’s cost of living is 54.8% above the national average. To maintain your standard of living after relocating from Atlanta, you’d have to earn at least $79,792. If you want to be a homeowner, be prepared to spend a significant amount of money. The median home value in Seattle is $752,187. If you prefer to rent, the median rent price is $2,600. 

 

The unemployment rate in the area is relatively low. As of December 2019, it was just 2.2%. The median household income was $85,562

 

 

 

5. Washington, D.C.

The cost of living in the nation’s capital is 62.6% above the national average. If you relocated from Atlanta to Washington D.C., you’d have to earn at least $82,095 to have the same spending power as you did before. 

 

The median household income is a high $82,604. The median home value in the area is $636,372, and the median rent price is $2,700. However, unemployment in Washington D.C. is quite high. As of December 2019, it was at 5.3%. Unless you already have a job lined up, it may be difficult to find a position since it’s a very competitive market. 

 

 

 

4. Brooklyn, NY

Brooklyn has become a more desirable area for New Yorkers to live, and it’s become more expensive as a result. Its cost of living is 81.7% above the national average, and you’d have to earn $92,206 to maintain your standard of living. 

 

While the housing market is expensive, incomes tend to be relatively low. The median household income for Brooklyn residents is just $56,015. And, the unemployment rate is quite high. As of 2018 — the last available data — the unemployment rate reached 4.6%.  

 

 

 

3. Honolulu, HI

Moving to an island paradise may sound like a dream come true, but that dream comes with a hefty price tag. Honolulu’s cost of living is 89.7% above the national average, largely because so much of your everyday essentials need to be imported. To maintain the standard of living you enjoyed in Atlanta, you’d have to earn $100,766 working in Honolulu. 

 

The median home value in Honolulu is $705,505, and the median rent price is $2,200. Unemployment is Honolulu is low; as of December 2019, unemployment was at 2.1%

 

 

 

2. San Francisco, CA

Many major employers call San Francisco home, including Salesforce, Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, and Genentech. With such big companies in the area, employees can often command high salaries. The median household income for San Francisco is $110,601, well above the national median income. 

 

However, San Francisco’s cost of living is quite high; it’s 96.3% above the national average. To maintain your standard of living, you’d have to find a job that paid at least $100,166 per year. 

 

The median home value in San Francisco is $1,392,859. If you want to rent an apartment, be prepared to pay a high price; the median rent price is a staggering $4,500 per month. 

 

 

 

1. Manhattan, NY

Manhattan is notorious for its sky-high cost of living. In fact, its cost of living is 148.5% higher than the national average. If you were to move to Manhattan from Atlanta, you’d have to increase your salary to $127,497 to maintain your standard of living — a $75,537 increase over your current income. Everything in Manhattan is more expensive, especially housing, food, and transportation. 

 

The median home value in Manhattan is $1,013,116, and the median rent price is $3,450. Unfortunately, finding and keeping a job to pay for those housing costs can be difficult since Manhattan does have a relatively high unemployment rate. As of 2018 — the last available data — it was at 4.1%

 

Living in an Expensive City

If you’re moving to a new city, it’s important to know what to expect in terms of cost of living and how far your income will go in your new location. Before moving, create a budget and streamline your expenses to free up as much money as you can. 

 

If you need to improve your cash flow, consider student loan refinancing. You could lower your interest rate or extend your repayment term to reduce your monthly payment, giving you more breathing room in your monthly budget so you can afford your new home. Use ELFI’s Find My Rate tool to get a quote without affecting your credit score.*

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply. 

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

7 Great Things to Spend Your Tax Refund On

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While tax season fills most people with dread, there’s one thing everyone looks forward to — tax refunds. According to the IRS, approximately 71% of American tax filers receive a tax refund. In 2019, the average tax refund was a whopping $2,869. If you’re like many people, that may be the biggest lump sum you’ll see all year – so it’s important to use it wisely. 

 

By Kat Tretina

Kat Tretina is a freelance writer based in Orlando, Florida. Her work has been featured in publications like The Huffington Post, Entrepreneur, and more. She is focused on helping people pay down their debt and boost their income.

 

7 Best things to spend your tax refund on

During tax season, retailers compete for your business. You’re bombarded with advertisements and sales trying to get you to spend your newfound money. But before parting with your hard-earned funds – it is money you worked for, after all – focus on using your tax refund on things that will improve your finances, your future financial prospects, and overall well-being. 

 

Need inspiration? Here are seven smart ways to use your tax refund. 

 

1. Student loan lump sum payments

Student loan debt can be a substantial burden, causing you to put off other goals like saving for retirement, relocating to a new city, buying a home, or even getting married. 

 

Using your tax refund to make a lump sum payment on your debt could allow you to save money on interest fees and help you pay off your loans ahead of schedule. 

 

For example, let’s say you had $30,000 in student loan debt at 6% APR. With a minimum monthly payment, it would take you 10 years to repay your loans. And, you’d repay a total of $39,970; interest charges would cost you $9,970. 

 

But let’s say you received $2,869 as a tax refund. If you applied the entire amount to your student loans as a lump sum payment, you’d pay off your loans 15 months early and you would repay just $37,801. By using your tax refund to make an extra payment on your debt, you would save $2,169 in interest charges. 

 

You can make your tax refund work even harder for you by refinancing your student loans to possibly lower your interest rate. Use our Student Loan Refinance Calculator to see what you could save by refinancing your student loans.* 

 

2. Medical procedures

If you’re like many people, you may have put off going to the doctor or visiting a dentist because you simply couldn’t afford it. In fact, 25% of Americans reported putting off necessary medical procedures due to cost. However, skipping routine medical and dental care can cause more expensive issues later on, so it’s important to stick to a preventative care routine. 

 

If you haven’t been to the doctor or dentist because you were short on cash, using your tax refund to take care of your health is a wise investment. 

 

3. Car repairs

Cars are often money pits, causing many people to skimp on routine repairs because of the expense. AAA reported that the average car repair is $500 to $600, but can often cost much more. Keeping up with your car’s maintenance and making necessary repairs can improve your car’s lifespan and fuel efficiency, helping you avoid more costly issues later on. 

 

If you’ve been putting off any repairs or need to replace your tires, use your tax refund to finance that purchase so you can get to and from work safely. 

 

4. Professional development

With technology changing so quickly, it’s essential that you keep on top of the latest trends in your field so that you remain competitive in the job market. If you want to take your career to the next level, consider using your tax refund to invest in your professional development. You can attend a conference, take a class, or hire a career coach. 

 

5. Investments

If your finances are in otherwise good shape – meaning you don’t have high-interest debt or a pressing immediate expense – you can use your tax refund to build long-term wealth. Consider using your refund to invest your money by making contributions to your retirement accounts or an individual taxable account. 

 

Don’t think your tax refund can make that much of a difference? Think again. Over time, your money can grow significantly. 

 

For example, let’s say you’re 30 years old and deposit your $2,869 into an individual taxable account. If you don’t deposit another cent and your money earns an average annual return of 8%, that account will have grown to $31,374 by the time you’re 60. 

 

If you’re not sure where to start, check out robo advisors like Betterment® or WealthFront®. They automatically invest your money based on your goals and risk tolerance, so you don’t have to be an investment expert to reap the rewards. 

 

6. Exercise equipment

Investing in your health and wellness is a good use for your money. Over time, it can help you save on health insurance and medical bills, too. 

 

Consider using some or all of your tax refund to purchase exercise equipment you’ll actually use. Or, sign up for a gym membership or take a few sessions with a personal trainer to ensure you’re using the equipment correctly. 

 

7. A new computer

If you freelance or are thinking of starting a new side hustle, you may want to use your tax refund to purchase a new computer or software so that you can work more efficiently. With better tools, you may be able to improve your earning potential. And, you may be able to deduct the cost of a new computer or software on next year’s taxes (talk to a tax professional about your unique situation). 

 

How not to spend your refund

There are a lot of bad ways to spend a tax refund. But one of the worst is using it to purchase a car you can’t really afford. Unfortunately, using a tax refund to buy a new car is incredibly common. 

 

Using your tax refund as a down payment can help you qualify for a car loan. But car values depreciate rapidly, and you could end up with a car that is too costly for your budget, or you could end up owing more than the car is worth. That issue can put you in a precarious financial position, and it’s hard to dig yourself out of debt. 

 

If you need reliable transportation, use your tax refund to purchase an inexpensive, used car that you can comfortably afford. If you need to take out a loan, financial experts recommend that you choose a loan term no longer than 36 months; if you need a longer loan term than that to manage the loan payments, the car is likely more than you can truly afford. 

 

There’s seven things that you should spend your tax refund on, along with one that you shouldn’t! Regardless of your situation, focus on spending your refund responsibly. 

 

For more information, learn how to create a monthly budget.

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply. 

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Why Experiences are the New Measure of Wealth

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By Caroline Farhat

 

For the past half-century of American history, material objects have been a primary source of value to the working class of Americans. Following World War II, many Americans dreamt of owning a suburban home, driving a car, and joining in on the baby boom. The U.S. saw significant expansion through the 40s and 50s, gross national product rose dramatically, as did personal expenditures on things. By the end of the 50s, the majority of families owned a television, a car, and a home. By 1960, blue-collar workers became avid buyers, enjoying more disposable income through the 1970s.

 

Today is a different story. A study found 74% of Americans value experiences over things. The reason for this shift in ideology can be tied to a number of things, such as younger adults having watched the effects of the 2008 recession and, as a result, feel less of a need to be tied to material objects. This is leading to many millennials skipping the mall to attend music festivals, skipping homeownership to live in the city, and putting off having children for added freedom. Rather than defining wealth by what they have, many young adults are measuring wealth by what they can experience.

 

Typical Measure of Wealth

Wealth is typically measured by calculating a person’s net worth. This is calculated as assets – liabilities = net worth. Assets can include homes, cash, retirement accounts, and stocks. Liabilities can include all debts such as student loans, auto loans, and mortgages. Take a look at this example to calculate net worth: 

  • If a person owns a home valued at $500,000, a car valued at $22,000, they have $15,000 saved in a bank account and $33,000 saved in a retirement account, they would have a total of $570,000 in assets.
  • If there is a mortgage on the home for $200,000 and a car loan for $5,000 and student loan debt of $30,000, this person would have liabilities totaling $235,000.
  • This person’s net worth would be $570,000 – $235,000 = $335,000.

The net worth that is considered “wealthy” is subjective, however, a survey conducted by the Federal Reserve in 2017 found that the median net worth of families was just $97,300. Calculating net worth allows a person to see numerically how much wealth they have, but it is not the only way people define wealth. 

 

Why Millennials Value Experiences

Calculating net worth may be considered an old measure of wealth by millennials (people born between 1981 and 1996), but why?

 

To begin with, millennials value relationships with others more than material objects. The benefit of being able to experience things with their friends and significant others seems to outweigh the benefit of accumulating wealth.

 

While millennials do seem to understand the value of saving money, they also understand the need for work-life balance. A study conducted by Deloitte found 57% of millennials say traveling is their top aspiration. This supports the notion that being able to enjoy life and experiences is a measure of wealth to millennials. This supports the notion that being able to enjoy life and experiences is a measure of wealth to millennials.

 

Another reason for the shift in measuring wealth is millennials are facing financial struggles that previous generations did not experience. According to a study by the Pew Research Center, more millennials have student loan debt compared to previous generations, and the amount of student loan debt they have is also greater. If you are dealing with student loan debt and high monthly payments, you may feel you are not able to purchase a home, start a family, or build the traditional standard of wealth. But even with a low net worth, millennials can partake in great experiences that add value to their life and make them feel wealthy. 

 

Options to Build Your Wealth

If you have student loan debt, whether federal or private student loans, you may be feeling you will never be able to grow your net worth or have the life experiences you want – but that is not the reality. Student loans do not have to hinder you from growing your wealth. Check out these options to build your wealth:

  • Start a side hustle. Earning extra money outside of your day job allows you the freedom to use the money how you want. It doesn’t have to pay the bills, it’s extra money that you can use to travel or put away for retirement. Plus your side hustle may lead you to passions and causes that are important to you which only further enhances your life!
  • Refinance your student loans. When you refinance your student loan you may be able to lower your monthly payment and save interest over the life of the loan. The extra money you have monthly could go towards experiences to enrich your life and extra savings in the bank for emergencies. How much savings can you expect a month? Check out our student loan refinance calculator on our site to get an estimate of your savings.* Student loan refinancing is easy with the right lender. With ELFI you never pay an application fee or origination fee. You also receive a personal loan advisor who guides you through the process of refinancing.
  • Create a zero-based budget. What if you were told to “spend” all of your income each month?  This might sound crazy at first, but many financial experts regard this method as the most effective one out there. The concept of zero-based budgeting is that your monthly income minus your expenses should equal zero. The idea is that each dime you make should have a “job” and fall into a certain category in your budget. For example, if your take-home pay is $5,000, you have exactly $5,000 to spend, save, or invest. This can help you take control of your finances and ensure every dollar is put to good use.
  • Use an effective debt-payoff strategy. Using the debt snowball or debt avalanche method of paying off debt can make payoff simpler and more effective. The debt snowball involves paying off debts with the lowest balances first, then moving onto the next smallest balance. The debt avalanche method involves paying off the largest debt first, then moving on to the next largest balance. Both strategies have their pros and cons, but both will also lead to a debt-free life.

 

Bottom Line

Wealth is more than just the possessions you own or the car you drive. Experiencing a full life with great relationships and experiences can lead to happiness overall. By getting a handle on your student loans not only will your typical financial wealth increase, but so can your experiences in life. No matter how you measure wealth, you can achieve it while paying your student loans!

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

We’re In Love with These 7 ELFI Customer Reviews

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Whether you’re spending time with the girls for ‘Galentine’s Day’ or spending the holiday with that special someone, today is a day to share some love with those you care about!

 

At ELFI, we show our love to our customers through top-notch customer service paired with low rates and flexible terms for refinancing their student loans – and sometimes they show us love back through great TrustPilot reviews. In light of Valentine’s Day, we’re sharing 7 ELFI customer reviews that we’re simply in love with!

 

All reviews below were given by real Education Loan Finance customers on TrustPilot. Results may vary.

 

Review #1:

“Loved the personal loan advisor experience … When she called me and left me a voicemail, she sounded like a friend, not a scary loan robot, and it really put me at ease through the process.”

No one likes a scary loan robot! It’s great to see that our personal loan advisors help put our customers at ease through the refinancing process by giving them guidance, answering questions, and keeping them informed of updates along the way!

 

 

Review #2:

“I wish I’d done this sooner! The refinance process was fairly straightforward and easy to manage, and having the added benefit of a loan advisor was super helpful. The rates are competitive and they have plenty of options for every person.”

We hear “I wish I’d done this sooner” pretty often from customers, but it’s always nice to see how happy they are once they’ve made the decision to refinance. If you still have a significant amount of student loan debt, it’s probably not too late to refinance!

 

Review #3:

“Promote this woman!! Candace was so knowledgeable, prompt, and helpful during every step of the process- made the experience seamless.”

So much enthusiasm from this customer! They don’t need to worry – we take great pride in the service given by our personal loan advisors and we love showing people how great they are. They truly do make the refinancing process as seamless as possible.

 

Review #4:

“Did not expect to be assigned to an actual representative so good on elfi for that.. Further.. I can tell that Ivan knows what he’s doing. He’s professional, with prompt responses. It’s one thing to put a representative in place, but another for that person to actually provide value. Sometimes with companies, you don’t even know who to contact to begin with, let alone, the company reaching out to you first, with a representative who’s coherent and professional.”

This means so much to us! We aimed to reshape the student loan refinancing industry by offering every customer with a single personal loan advisor that can understand their situation and guide them through the process… Receiving reviews like this truly make us blush because it shows that our process works!

 

Review #5:

“Andrea was incredibly helpful! It was nice to have someone take the time to answer all of my questions, provide explanations and keep me apprised of next steps. Refinancing was a breeze…thanks ELFI and Andrea!”

Kudos to Andrea for making refinancing a simple process for this customer! Regardless of your lender, there are always going to be several steps involved in the refinancing process – but having someone there to show you the path ahead really makes it a breeze.

 

Review #6:

“Great rates and very helpful customer service. Didier walked me through the process and made it very easy to me to get my loans set up quickly and painlessly. I highly recommend ELFI to anyone looking to refinance their student loans. I compared payment options to several other companies, and Education Loan Finance by far had the best options. I was able to reduce my monthly payments and now I will be paying off my loans in 7 years, rather than 10. Five stars!”

This customer cut three years off of their repayment term by refinancing with ELFI, and they sure seemed happy about it!

 

Review #7:

“I’ve been afraid to refinance for years. ELFI was rated well on NerdWallet so I decided to apply. They actually made it easy to understand what I needed to refinance, how the process works etc. I also had someone assigned to help me and answer any questions. I’m so happy to have my loan with a company designed for the modern age who is actually transparent and helpful.”

Shucks! This customer was putting off refinancing for years, and we couldn’t be happier to be their refi match made in heaven. Our transparent process and personalized customer service really made the difference here!

 

 

What else can we say? We love our customers, and these reviews show us that the feeling is mutual. Our average TrustPilot rating currently stands at 4.9/5 stars, with over 800 reviews! Don’t just take our word for it – check our all of our reviews here.

 

Interested in finding your student loan refinancing match in ELFI? Our personal loan advisors are just a call, text, or email away. One of our PLAs will be dedicated to you from the moment you apply and will work with you each step of the way to ensure your ELFI refinanced loan is the optimal fit for you. Contact us to get started!*

 

Oh, and Happy Valentine’s Day from ELFI!

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Refinancing Student Loans to Buy Your First Home

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So, you’re ready to buy your first home? Look at you all grown up and wanting to be smart with your money. The truth is, you were smart enough to invest in your future by working hard for your degree(s), and now you want to double down and dig in some roots. But you may be wondering how you’re going to juggle both a mortgage AND a burdensome student loan payment every month. In fact, 41% of college grads with student loan debt hesitate to purchase a home because of the sizeable amount of student loan debt they have.

 

Note: This blog was previously published in March of 2018, but has been updated to be current for our readers.

 

Purchasing your first home is a massive decision, and you’re wise to not take it lightly. But it doesn’t hurt to dream, right?

 

Picture yourself parking in the driveway of your first dream home. As you slowly walk up to the front door, everything has this wonderful soft glow and your peripherals are a bit cloudy because, well it’s a dream and that’s what they do in the movies. Anyways, you reach out for the door handle and are pleasantly surprised to find it has the perfect form, as if it were fitted for your hand alone.

 

You squeeze the latch, crack the door open and take the first step inside. It’s perfect. Everything is just as you imagined. You take another step towards the living room and brush against something with your foot. You look down to find a pile of old mail. “That’s strange,” you think to yourself. “This home doesn’t have any previous owners. This is MY dream home.” Perplexed, you shuffle through the stack and are horrified to find they’re all bills…. And they’re all addressed to you.

 

An eerie feeling crawls up your spine about the same time you hear a chilling voice say, “Stuuuudent Loooaaans.” The front door slams behind you, presumably by the Ghost of Student Loan Future. To your dismay, the living room begins to shrink and warp into a strangely familiar studio apartment. It’s at this moment you realize your dream has just become a nightmare and you have descended to the basement of Homeowner’s Purgatory, known as, “Oh Yeah, I Have Enough Student Loan Debt to Buy a Mid-Sized House. Maybe One Day I’ll Be Able to Afford It. Maybe.”

 

Fortunately, this is only a dream, and a fake one at that. More relieving, perhaps, is that this blog was not written to encourage or discourage you from purchasing a home; chances are you’ve already made up your mind on that. Besides, there are plenty of other blogs out there that can take you down that rabbit hole. What we’d like to do is help you understand how your student loan debt can and will affect your eligibility for homeownership, as well as ways to improve your chances of approval by offering ways for you to possibly pay off your debt faster and reduce the amount you’ll pay in total, such as refinancing your student loans.

 

Graduated Savings Plan

First and foremost, paying off student loan debt and purchasing a home are not linear. With a graduated savings plan, you can pay down your debt and save for a home at the same time. Start out by putting the majority of your discretionary income towards your debt and set aside 10% for down-payment savings. Next year, decrease your student loan payments to 75% and increase your savings to 25%. The following year, aim for a 50/50 split and continue the trend until you’ve paid off your student loan debt and can finally allocate 100% of your discretionary income towards your down payment.

 

Lower Your Monthly Payment

Before approving your mortgage, lenders are going to be looking closely at how much other debt you owe. Your student loan debt will likely be the heaviest hitter on that roster. They will also take into account car loans, financed furniture, etc. Your best chance for approval is to aim for a debt-to-income ratio of about 25%. Technically the cut-off is at 43%, but you’ll likely borrow at a much higher interest rate and require you to have mortgage insurance. That’s going to really ramp up your monthly payments. While your overall debt-to-income ratio will certainly play a role in your eligibility, it may surprise you to learn that mortgage lenders are not so much concerned with the overall balance as they are with your monthly payments going towards the debt.

 

One of the best things you can do to get your financial house in order is to lower your monthly student loan payments by refinancing their student loans. While this will not remove the reality of student loan debt, consolidating your multiple student loans into one loan will eliminate the hassle of keeping track on your slew of different rates and terms. You can lower your monthly payment even more by extending the repayment term of your loan by few years, though this will affect the total amount of interest you end up.

 

Lock-In Your Rates

Over the past several years, variable interest rate loans have hovered around historical lows. However, you may have noticed that the prime rate has been on the rise, and this will surely affect anyone with variable rate loans. When you consolidate loans, you have the opportunity to lock-in a fixed interest rate for all of your student loan debt, eliminating any variable rates that could prove problematic when the economy improves and interest rates follow suit. Locked-in rates mean locked-in payment, and it’s comforting to know exactly how much you’ll owe every month for the rest of your loan term (the bank will like it too). If you are even thinking about refinancing as a way to get one step closer to purchasing your first home, now is the time to take advantage of your good credit score and get the lowest rates you can qualify for in the event they continue to rise.

 

Opening Doors to a New Life

In the end, purchasing your first home while simultaneously paying down student loan debt is more than simply crunching the numbers. Keep in mind that homeownership is far more than a mortgage payment. It’s also furniture and renovations, not to mention general upkeep, which tends to average more than one percent of the total cost of the home per year. You need to weigh very real costs against your invaluable personal happiness – both present and future. As no one can help you with this formula, it’s best to follow your gut.

 

Remember, your student loan debt and your first home purchase are both investments. Get creative with this abstract equation by having a roommate or utilizing online vacation rental websites, as either option may cover the majority of your mortgage. If you buy in the right neighborhood, you might even earn a couple hundred bucks, which, being the smart and financially responsible adult you are, will go directly towards paying down your student loan debt. It’s a great way to have your cake and eat it too until the day comes when you can reach out and cut a little slice of heaven out of that pie in the sky.

 

All that being said, take a serious look at refinancing student debt. If you are able to get in on a home purchase more quickly by reducing student loan payments now, you may also enjoy a lower rate on your mortgage loan. ‘A dollar saved is a dollar earned’, especially when it comes to student loan debt. Find out home much you can save with ELFI.*

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Starting a Family? Why Now’s the Time to Refinance Student Loans

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By Caroline Farhat

 

Are you planning to start (or add to your) family? Congratulations! Children are such a special joy, and starting a family is an incredible journey. Whether you’re already expecting or are just in the planning stages, there is a good chance you’ve started crunching some numbers to see how adding a family member will affect your monthly budget. It’s no secret that kids are expensive — the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that, on average, it would cost a middle-income family $233,610 to raise a child born in 2015 through the age of 17. If you’re currently paying off debt, the eye-popping numbers a child costs may look even more daunting. But money should absolutely not stop you from starting a family. Of course, you want to be financially responsible, but you shouldn’t feel pressured to be debt-free before starting a family. Instead, focus on the things you can do to lighten your budget and leave more room for your new bundle of joy. Here’s how refinancing student loans can help. 

 

Why Refinancing Student Loans When Starting a Family is a Smart Move

One of the biggest worries many new parents have about starting a family is the financial unpredictability children can bring to the household budget. Medical costs, childcare, and all of the latest baby products can certainly add up. One of the best ways to combat this unpredictability is by lowering your fixed monthly costs. 

 

If you are currently paying off student loan debt, refinancing student loans is one of the smartest steps you can take to lower your monthly payment. In fact, student loan borrowers who refinance with ELFI* have reported an average savings of $272 per month1. To put that in perspective, that would get you 38 packs of 32-count diapers. Plus, the emotional benefits you can receive by throwing less money at your student loan debt and more on what is really meaningful to you can be priceless. 

 

How To Refinance Student Loans

If you’re looking at your interest rate and are ready to refinance, you’ll be happy to know that it’s a simple process that can be done entirely online. If you refinance student loans with ELFI, the application process is 100% free, and refinancing has no origination fees or prepayment penalties. The ROI of refinancing student loans can also be quite large. Just an hour or two of work can yield you thousands of dollars in savings. Not bad, right? Here’s what to do:

 

  • Check the requirements – While student loan refinancing is a smart move for many student loan borrowers, there are a few cases where refinancing may not be the best option. For example, if you qualify for student loan forgiveness through a federal program, refinancing student loans would make you ineligible for this benefit. Review the basic criteria for student loan refinancing to make sure it’s the best fit for your particular situation. It’s important to fully understand how the Public Student Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program works and the eligibility requirements. 

 

>> Related: Student Loan Refinancing vs. Public Service Loan Forgiveness

 

  • Crunch the Numbers – Put your data into our student loan refinance calculator to see your potential savings. Our calculator has options for fixed and variable interests and loan terms of 5, 7, 10, 15, or even 20-year terms so you can see how your choices affect your monthly and lifetime payment*.
  • Get prequalified – You can get prequalified and receive personalized rates in just a few minutes without it affecting your credit score.
  • Gather your documents and apply – As mentioned, the application is 100% online, easy, and free. When refinancing with ELFI, you are paired with a personal loan advisor who will guide you through every step of the process. The Personal Loan Advisor who speak with at the beginning of the student loan refinancing process is the same person you’ll speak with at the end, which is nice because you won’t find yourself repeating information or prior discussions.

 

What to Do About Other Debt and Expenses

If you’re like many Americans, student loan debt may not be the only debt you are currently paying off. A whopping 80% of Americans are currently in debt, according to a report from The Pew Charitable Trusts. Here are a few ways you can pay off your debt more quickly or more efficiently.

 

  • Refinance Your Debt – Similar to refinancing student loans, you should look for opportunities to refinance any of your other debt. For example, if you have a mortgage, refinancing could save you thousands of dollars over the life of your loan. Auto loans can also be good candidates for refinancing. 
  • Call Your Credit Card Companies – A reduction in the interest rates on your credit cards can make a big difference in how quickly you can pay down debt. A simple, polite phone call to your credit card companies requesting an interest rate reduction can sometimes be all that it takes. You have nothing to lose (except a few minutes), and the payoff can make a major difference in your monthly budget. 
  • Explore Medical Debt Options – Approximately 66.5% of Americans who file for bankruptcy due so because of medical bills. There are options to get this debt under control, but it will take some leg work. NerdWallet has a number of good tips for how to negotiate down your medical debt or develop a payment plan that works for your budget. 

 

Typically, when paying off debt, it’s wise to start with the loan with the highest interest, as that will save you the most money in the long run. Once you have reduced your interest rates as much as possible, take stock of all of your existing debt payments and their monthly costs, and develop a plan. With any of the money you saved, you can start a separate savings account for your growing family. 

 

Children Are Priceless, So Don’t Let Debt Stop You

It may sound cliché, but there are things in life that are just priceless. For many people, the love and joy a child can bring to life are worth more than any spreadsheet will tell you. If you are currently working towards paying off debt, don’t let the goal of being debt-free trump your desire to start a family. There simply may never be a perfect time. Plus, with a little planning, it’s entirely possible to start a family and still work on your financial goals. 

 

Good luck to all of our current and future parents out there – you got this!

 


 

*Education Loan Finance is a nationwide student loan debt consolidation and refinance program offered by Tennessee based SouthEast Bank. ELFI is designed to assist borrowers through consolidating and refinancing loans into one single loan that effectively lowers your cost of education debt and/or makes repayment very simple. Subject to credit approval. See Terms & Conditions, The interest rate and monthly payment for a variable rate loan may increase after closing, but will never exceed 9.95% APR. For example, a 10-year loan with a fixed rate of 6% would have 120 payments of $11.00 per $1,000 borrowed. Rates are subject to change.

 

1Average savings calculations are based on information provided by SouthEast Bank/ Education Loan Finance customers who refinanced their student loans between 2/7/2020 and 2/21/2020. While these amounts represent reported average amounts saved, actual amounts saved will vary depending upon a number of factors.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

4 New Year’s Resolutions You Can Actually Keep

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The New Year is upon us – it’s a time for celebration, reflection, and inevitably, for setting resolutions. From achieving financial goals such as repaying student loan debt to health-related goals such as losing weight, we are often pressured to set bold aspirations for the upcoming year. But despite the popularity of setting New Year’s resolutions, they can be fairly difficult to stick with if you set your goals too high or merely set them out of obligation. You can set goals at any time in your life, for any reason, and a new year doesn’t have to always mean a completely new you. 

 

For the sake of taking some of the burden off of the holiday, we’re listing out some New Year’s resolutions you can keep through the year – and feel great about, too.

 

Start Volunteering

Volunteering isn’t just for students looking to build their resume. Volunteering for causes you believe in is a great way to build friendships, keep busy, and make connections in your community. Volunteer Match is a great place to find opportunities to support charities, nonprofits, organizations and causes near you. Volunteering will leave you feeling empowered and more fulfilled through knowing you’ve made an impact. Consider taking on the New Year with less stress about adding to your own life and shift the focus to giving back!

 

Stop Procrastinating… As Much

Here’s to making 2020 the year of getting ahead. While it can sometimes be difficult to not put work off until the last minute, make a resolution to spend your free time getting ahead on things – in the end it will leave you with less stress and more free time than you intended on having. Sometimes this requires a shift of mindset, but it is doable. Make 2020 the year you start putting your top priorities first.

 

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

No matter your goals for the upcoming year, understand that great things take time. Focus on making improvements where you can and don’t let minor setbacks take you off track. Life can come at you quickly, so it’s important to keep a level head and understand that most bad things are temporary and will pass. Enter 2020 with a plan for managing stress, taking things one step at a time, and having patience – you may just find that this is the most effective resolution you can set.

 

Revisit Your Resume

While you may be happy with your current job and plan on sticking with it, a new year is a good reason to give your resume a tune-up. What skills have you acquired over the previous year? How many years of experience do you now have in your field? Taking stock of what you bring can help you gain a new understanding of the salary you deserve, make you feel accomplished for how far you’ve come, or even help you set goals for your professional life in the year to come.

 

There you go! Now you have four New Year’s resolutions that you can start in 2020 and keep throughout the year. Hopefully these simple, achievable resolutions take some stress off of your holiday and allow you to look into 2020 with a positive and stress-free mindset.

 


 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Yes, You Need a Side Hustle

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Side hustle. It’s a relatively new phrase, but a concept that’s older than you think. It’s simply a second job that helps people make ends meet or earn extra cash to supplement retirement plans, pay off student loan debt, save up to buy a car, etc. You might also hear these jobs referred to as gigs, which constitute the gig economy.

 

Why the Popularity?

If you wonder why you’re hearing so much about side hustles and the gig economy, it’s because these concepts have exploded in popularity. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 55 million people work in the gig economy, which is more than 35% of the country’s workforce. “Side hustlers,” as they’re called, take the form of teachers who write blogs for major companies, stay-at-home moms who moonlight as Uber® drivers, retirees who tutor school-age children, or even college students who design logos for local businesses.

 

But side hustles aren’t limited to these more typical archetypes. Even high-earning, highly skilled professions offer ample opportunities for “side hustling”. For example, the gig economy has increasingly penetrated the healthcare industry – doctors and nurses have the ability to work in temporary positions called “locum tenens” to fill staffing needs at healthcare facilities. These positions, often worked during shift downtimes, allow healthcare professionals to have more flexibility and control of their schedule while earning supplemental income. High-end software developers at major technology brands can also benefit from the gig economy, using sites like Upwork to maximize the return on their skills and to explore new projects.

 

A study on the Gig Economy & The Future of Retirement found that of people with a side hustle, 49% over the age of 55 are using it to save for retirement and 33% are using it to pay off student loan debt. Regardless of the reason, the answer to the question, “Do I need a side hustle?” is almost always, “Yes!” 

 

Check out the following scenario to see just how valuable a side hustle can be. The average student loan debt in America is around $37,000 with a loan term of 10 years and monthly payments of $380 a month. If you made an extra $100 a month ($1,200 a year), you could make three extra payments a year, helping you pay down your student loan debt up to two years early! If you want to see how much you can impact your loan with a side hustle, check out our student loan refinance calculator. 

 

Not only can you bring in extra income with a second gig, you can also diversify how you make that money. In other words, if you lose your full-time job, you will still have a way to pay bills.

 

Having a side gig is also a way for you to indulge hobbies or hone talents, giving more meaning to your work than perhaps your regular nine-to-five job. If you’re really good with computers, have a knack for photography, possess a knowledge of HVAC systems, or if you’re just really good at IKEA® assembly directions, you can pick up a side hustle by hawking your services on sites like Thumbtack®, Nextdoor®, TaskRabbit®, or Fiverr®.

 

The ideal hustle would allow you to “make money while you sleep.” It sounds hokey, but if you don’t have to trade working hours for money, you can reach your extra income goals to pay off student loan debt without sacrificing your full-time job, family, or social life to do so. These holy grail side hustles take the form of rental properties (that you pay someone else to manage), stock market investing, renting a room or parking space, publishing a book, creating an app, or other similar ideas that require little time to maintain.

 

One such example is with ELFI’s Referral Program. Simply sign up and create a personalized referral link to share with friends or family. When someone decides to refinance their student loans using your link, you’ll get a $400 referral bonus check and your friend will receive a $100 credit toward the principal balance of an approved Education Loan Finance loan1. There’s no limit on the number of people you can refer.

 

Downfalls of Side Hustles

While we started this blog by saying, “Yes, you need a side hustle,” there are several downfalls that you should be aware of. Sure, the hours for side gigs are flexible, but these jobs also don’t come with employer benefits. This means there is no safety net of unemployment claims should you not be able to find enough work. Also, if you don’t have a clear, effective contract and invoicing system set up, payment can get delayed or—even worse—lost in the shuffle. If you don’t work with honest people or established companies, both can run out of money or just simply disappear without paying money owed.

 

You also need strong personal motivation to work a side hustle. Like most jobs, side hustles rarely just fall profitably into your lap. You should realistically expect to spend a few hours a week promoting yourself and following up on leads. You need to be organized and disciplined to avoid double-booking yourself and to get the work done by agreed-upon deadlines.

 

You’ll also need to be diligent when it comes to taxes2. The money made from your side job will need to be reported on a 1040 Form at tax time. If you fail to report your earnings, you might find yourself subject to tax assessments or penalties. On the plus side of tax time with a side gig, you may be able to deduct certain expenses like car mileage related to your business, necessary equipment, or even subscriptions to business-related organizations.

 

When it comes to side hustles, there’s no need to quit your day job to earn extra cash. The benefits outweigh the downfalls, and a bonus gig can actually benefit your day job by giving you additional skills and insights or by helping you make connections with clients you wouldn’t otherwise meet. You can work as little or as much as you’d like on your own schedule to pay down debts or save for big expenses.

 

Curious about how much you need to earn with a side gig to pay down your student loan debt? First, see how much you could save by using our Student Loan Refinance Calculator*. Once you know what your monthly payment could be, you can set a realistic target for your extra income. The Student Loan Refinance Calculator will show you your current vs estimated monthly payment, as well as estimated monthly and lifetime savings.

 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 


 

1Subject to credit approval. Program requirements apply. Limit one $400 cash bonus per referral. Offer available to those who are above the age of majority in their state of legal residence who refer new customers who refinance their education loans with Education Loan Finance. The new customer will receive a $100 principal reduction on the new loan within 6-8 weeks of loan disbursement. The referring party will be mailed a $400 cash bonus check within 6-8 weeks after both the loan has been disbursed, and the referring party has provided ELFI with a completed IRS form W-9. Taxes are the sole responsibility of each recipient. A new customer is an individual without an existing Education Loan Finance loan account and who has not held an Education Loan Finance loan account within the past 24 months. Additional terms and conditions apply.

 

2This blog has been prepared for informational purposes only, and does not constitute tax or financial advice. Please consult your tax advisor for guidance on your personal tax situation.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.