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Student Loan Refinancing

Refinancing Student Loans to Buy Your First Home

February 4, 2020

So, you’re ready to buy your first home? Look at you all grown up and wanting to be smart with your money. The truth is, you were smart enough to invest in your future by working hard for your degree(s), and now you want to double down and dig in some roots. But you may be wondering how you’re going to juggle both a mortgage AND a burdensome student loan payment every month. In fact, 41% of college grads with student loan debt hesitate to purchase a home because of the sizeable amount of student loan debt they have.

 

Note: This blog was previously published in March of 2018, but has been updated to be current for our readers.

 

Purchasing your first home is a massive decision, and you’re wise to not take it lightly. But it doesn’t hurt to dream, right?

 

Picture yourself parking in the driveway of your first dream home. As you slowly walk up to the front door, everything has this wonderful soft glow and your peripherals are a bit cloudy because, well it’s a dream and that’s what they do in the movies. Anyways, you reach out for the door handle and are pleasantly surprised to find it has the perfect form, as if it were fitted for your hand alone.

 

You squeeze the latch, crack the door open and take the first step inside. It’s perfect. Everything is just as you imagined. You take another step towards the living room and brush against something with your foot. You look down to find a pile of old mail. “That’s strange,” you think to yourself. “This home doesn’t have any previous owners. This is MY dream home.” Perplexed, you shuffle through the stack and are horrified to find they’re all bills…. And they’re all addressed to you.

 

An eerie feeling crawls up your spine about the same time you hear a chilling voice say, “Stuuuudent Loooaaans.” The front door slams behind you, presumably by the Ghost of Student Loan Future. To your dismay, the living room begins to shrink and warp into a strangely familiar studio apartment. It’s at this moment you realize your dream has just become a nightmare and you have descended to the basement of Homeowner’s Purgatory, known as, “Oh Yeah, I Have Enough Student Loan Debt to Buy a Mid-Sized House. Maybe One Day I’ll Be Able to Afford It. Maybe.”

 

Fortunately, this is only a dream, and a fake one at that. More relieving, perhaps, is that this blog was not written to encourage or discourage you from purchasing a home; chances are you’ve already made up your mind on that. Besides, there are plenty of other blogs out there that can take you down that rabbit hole. What we’d like to do is help you understand how your student loan debt can and will affect your eligibility for homeownership, as well as ways to improve your chances of approval by offering ways for you to possibly pay off your debt faster and reduce the amount you’ll pay in total, such as refinancing your student loans.

 

Graduated Savings Plan

First and foremost, paying off student loan debt and purchasing a home are not linear. With a graduated savings plan, you can pay down your debt and save for a home at the same time. Start out by putting the majority of your discretionary income towards your debt and set aside 10% for down-payment savings. Next year, decrease your student loan payments to 75% and increase your savings to 25%. The following year, aim for a 50/50 split and continue the trend until you’ve paid off your student loan debt and can finally allocate 100% of your discretionary income towards your down payment.

 

Lower Your Monthly Payment

Before approving your mortgage, lenders are going to be looking closely at how much other debt you owe. Your student loan debt will likely be the heaviest hitter on that roster. They will also take into account car loans, financed furniture, etc. Your best chance for approval is to aim for a debt-to-income ratio of about 25%. Technically the cut-off is at 43%, but you’ll likely borrow at a much higher interest rate and require you to have mortgage insurance. That’s going to really ramp up your monthly payments. While your overall debt-to-income ratio will certainly play a role in your eligibility, it may surprise you to learn that mortgage lenders are not so much concerned with the overall balance as they are with your monthly payments going towards the debt.

 

One of the best things you can do to get your financial house in order is to lower your monthly student loan payments by refinancing their student loans. While this will not remove the reality of student loan debt, consolidating your multiple student loans into one loan will eliminate the hassle of keeping track on your slew of different rates and terms. You can lower your monthly payment even more by extending the repayment term of your loan by few years, though this will affect the total amount of interest you end up.

 

Lock-In Your Rates

Over the past several years, variable interest rate loans have hovered around historical lows. However, you may have noticed that the prime rate has been on the rise, and this will surely affect anyone with variable rate loans. When you consolidate loans, you have the opportunity to lock-in a fixed interest rate for all of your student loan debt, eliminating any variable rates that could prove problematic when the economy improves and interest rates follow suit. Locked-in rates mean locked-in payment, and it’s comforting to know exactly how much you’ll owe every month for the rest of your loan term (the bank will like it too). If you are even thinking about refinancing as a way to get one step closer to purchasing your first home, now is the time to take advantage of your good credit score and get the lowest rates you can qualify for in the event they continue to rise.

 

Opening Doors to a New Life

In the end, purchasing your first home while simultaneously paying down student loan debt is more than simply crunching the numbers. Keep in mind that homeownership is far more than a mortgage payment. It’s also furniture and renovations, not to mention general upkeep, which tends to average more than one percent of the total cost of the home per year. You need to weigh very real costs against your invaluable personal happiness – both present and future. As no one can help you with this formula, it’s best to follow your gut.

 

Remember, your student loan debt and your first home purchase are both investments. Get creative with this abstract equation by having a roommate or utilizing online vacation rental websites, as either option may cover the majority of your mortgage. If you buy in the right neighborhood, you might even earn a couple hundred bucks, which, being the smart and financially responsible adult you are, will go directly towards paying down your student loan debt. It’s a great way to have your cake and eat it too until the day comes when you can reach out and cut a little slice of heaven out of that pie in the sky.

 

All that being said, take a serious look at refinancing student debt. If you are able to get in on a home purchase more quickly by reducing student loan payments now, you may also enjoy a lower rate on your mortgage loan. ‘A dollar saved is a dollar earned’, especially when it comes to student loan debt. Find out home much you can save with ELFI.*

 


 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

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2020-10-28
Refinancing Private Student Loans

Many individuals take out private student loans to finance their undergraduate or graduate school education. Once they have obtained their respective degrees and graduated, student loan payments will begin coming due, typically following a grace period. While many individuals will pay their student loans to their original lender with the same interest rates and terms as when they obtained their loans, many choose to refinance their private student loans to reduce their monthly payment, save on interest, or pay off their loans faster.   Refinancing private student loans is the process of taking a new loan out with a private lender, often with a different interest rate and loan term. This page will provide an overview of refinancing private student loans to help you determine whether you should consider it.  

Should I Refinance Private Student Loans?

Refinancing private student loans is very similar to the process of consolidating student loans, which is when you combine multiple student loans into one loan with a weighted average interest rate. However, there are several potential benefits of refinancing private student loans that student loan consolidation does not offer. Here are a few of the
benefits of student loan refinancing.  

Lower Private Student Loan Refinancing Rates

Above all, the primary benefit of refinancing student loans is the potential to save money by lowering your interest rate. When you graduated from your respective program, the interest rates on your private student loans may have been higher than what private lenders currently offer to refinance student loans.   For example, if you took our $50,000 in private student loans at a 6.0% interest rate for a 20-year term, your monthly payment would be $358.22 per month, and you would pay a total of $85,971.73 over your loan term if all payments were made on time, with approximately $35,971.73 of that total being paid on interest alone. If you refinanced your $50,000 private student loans to the 20-year term with a 4.5% interest rate, your monthly payment would drop to $316.32 and you would pay just $75,917.93 over your loan term, with approximately $25,917.93 of that total being paid in interest. You would save $41.90 per month and $10,053.80 in interest costs.   The interest rate that is offered to you depends on a variety of factors that are typical when taking out a loan, such as your credit score, credit history, debt-to-income ratio, among other factors. Raising your credit score 50 or 100 points could make a considerable impact on how much you could save by refinancing private student loans. See how much you could potentially save by using our student loan refinancing calculator.*  

Adjusting Your Repayment Terms

In addition to lowering your interest rate, refinancing private student loans also allows you to adjust the length of your loan term to fit your goals and budget. Typically, shorter loan terms come with lower interest rates, allowing you to save on interest over your loan term, while longer loan terms come with slightly higher rates, but allow you to save on your monthly payments. Here are three ways that adjusting your repayment can help you better manage your student loans.
  • Simplify repayment by combining loans. When you refinance your private student loans, you can consolidate or combine multiple loans into a single loan with a single monthly payment. This can help you better track your total loan balance and get a clearer look at your repayment timeline.
  • Extend your loan term to save on monthly payments. By extending your loan term, you can spread out your payments over a longer period of time, often allowing you to reduce the amount you pay monthly. Having this extra cash can allow you to use that money for other financial goals, such as saving for retirement or purchasing a home.
  • Shorten your loan term to save on interest and pay off your loan faster. Oppositely of extending your loan term, shortening your loan term can often allow you to lower your interest rate and will shorten the amount of time that interest accrues, allowing you to save on interest and pay off your loans faster.
 

Choosing a New Lender

Another benefit of refinancing private student loans is the opportunity to switch to a new lender who may have additional benefits, such as forbearance options in the case of financial hardship or superior customer service. For example, with Education Loan Finance, if you are unable to repay your loan because of financial hardship or medical difficulty, Education Loan Finance may grant forbearance for up to 12 months. Additionally, Education Loan Finance offers superior customer service in the form of readily available Personal Loan Advisors who can help you through each step of the refinancing process and guide you toward the right repayment plan. Keep in mind that refinancing student loans for the sole purpose of switching lenders may not be the best decision, especially if it costs you money. If you're interested in refinancing student loans, learn more about Education Loan Finance.  

Reasons Not to Refinance Private Student Loans

Refinancing private student loans can be beneficial to many people, however, there are certain circumstances in which this may not be the case. It's important to understand whether refinancing private student loans will help you save on your student loans or pay them off faster.   For example, if you attempt to refinance private student loans and the interest rate you qualify for doesn't either help you save in total interest paid, nor helps you lower your monthly payments, you may want to wait some time and improve your borrowing credentials before refinancing. In some situations, even if you are able to lower your monthly payments, but will be paying a significant amount more in total interest costs, you may want to consider if it's the best solution. Likewise, if you are saving in total interest, but your monthly payment will be unmanageable, you may be at risk of missing payments or, even worse, defaulting on your loan. Additionally, refinancing with a new lender may cost you certain benefits that your current lender offers.  

Consolidating Private Student Loans vs Refinancing

When you are attempting to adjust your student loan repayment terms, you may come across student loan consolidation options. While student loan refinancing and consolidation are similar in that you are combining multiple loans into one loan with a single lender, the two are not exactly the same. Learn more about the difference between student loan consolidation vs. refinancing.  

Can I Refinance My Private Student Loans?

Anyone with private student loans can refinance them as long as they qualify by meeting a private lender's specific eligibility requirements for refinancing student loans.   For example, in order to refinance with Education Loan Finance*, you must meet the following criteria at a minimum:
  • be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien without conditions and with proper evidence of eligibility.
  • be at the age of majority or older at the time of loan application.
  • have a minimum loan amount of $15,000.
  • have earned a Bachelor’s degree or higher.
  • have a minimum income of $35,000.
  • have a minimum credit score of 680.
  • have a minimum credit history of 36 months.
  • have received a degree from an approved post-secondary institution and program of study.
  In conclusion, refinancing private student loans can be very helpful to individuals who qualify and are interested in saving money in interest or lowering their monthly payments. Learn more about student loan refinancing with ELFI to see if it's right for you.
2020-10-23
Ace Your Interview: Job Interview Tips

Life after graduation is full of responsibilities, like taxes, groceries and full-time jobs, but also full of opportunities. To capture these opportunities, you need to be prepared, and the best way to do that is to make sure you give the best job interviews possible. Here are a few job interview tips to help:  

Write a Top-Notch Resume

First step: get your
resume into shape. Make sure you fill it with your valuable work experience and qualifications. Your goal is to showcase the most successful and productive version of yourself possible.   Volunteer work, certifications, awards, and other accomplishments can all have a place on your resume. Many people like to build from resume templates you can find online, but if you use a resume template, just be sure you’ve thoroughly checked the verbiage to make sure it doesn’t sound scripted.   Your resume should show off your unique talents and skill set, as well as any numbers or figures that back up your work.  

Do the Research

One of the most important job interview tips is doing research beforehand. You want to be knowledgeable about both the job and the employer when you are being interviewed. Look at the company website to learn about company history, accomplishments, and other information. Also, take some time to read recent news about the company.   When you know what the company is looking for, you’ll be able to easily answer questions about how you will fit into the work environment.  

Know the Common Questions

Many interviewers ask the same, basic questions to better understand their candidates. While some may ask curveball questions, as well, you’ll be a step ahead if you come prepared with answers to common questions.   Examples include “Tell me about yourself” and “What are your greatest strengths and weaknesses?” Even though these sound like very basic questions, it’s important to give a thoughtful answer. Take your time thinking through responses prior to the interview. Indeed has a fantastic list of 125 such questions to ensure you are never at a loss for words.   Don’t stress about knowing all the answers; just practice the ones you think are most important. Then, if they ask you something unexpected, you’ll have a few ideas to pull from.  

Practice

Once your research is done, it’s time to practice. Ask a friend, parent, sibling or roommate to run through interview questions with you. Focus on answering smoothly and confidently.   In a similar vein, treat any job interview you go to as practice. If you don’t get the job, you’ve still gained valuable interview experience.  

Ask Questions

One job interview tip some people don't think about is to prepare your own questions.   A job interview isn’t just an opportunity for a prospective employer to learn about you. It’s also a chance for you to learn about them. Ask questions you really want answers to, not just questions you think will impress the interviewer. Honest questions demonstrate interest and can help you decide whether you’d like to work for the company.   Ideally, you should prepare your questions in advance. That way, you’ll be ready when the interviewer asks, “Do you have any questions for me?” If you’re at a loss for words, questions about corporate culture and growth opportunities are always good options.  

Dress the Part

When dressing for a job interview, you should think about the first impression you’d like to make on your potential employer. If you aren’t sure about an outfit, err on the side of caution. It’s better to be overdressed than underdressed. When in doubt, it’s hard to go wrong with simple, business-professional clothing.   Of course, this is by no means an all-purpose interview cheat code. Different employers will expect their employees to wear different things. An interview at a bank will require far more formal dress than an interview at quick-service restaurant.   Again, though, err on the side of caution. You likely won’t be passed over for a job because you were too well dressed. To top it all off, research has shown that dressing up can significantly boost your confidence.  

Follow Up

After the interview, consider sending a thank-you email to the hiring manager. Express your gratitude for the interview and impress upon them your interest in the position. Be enthusiastic. You’ve got one more chance to make a positive impression.   If you get the job, congratulations. That’s fantastic. If you don’t, don’t stress. You’ve done the best you could do, and you’ve gained valuable interview experience to boot. Sometimes it takes time to find the perfect job. With your interview experience, you’ll be all the more likely to get it. If you’re looking for a job in the medical field, check out this article on common resume mistakes for medical professionals.  
  Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no­­­ control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
2020-10-20
Engineering School Student Loan Refinancing

Student loan refinancing is a fantastic option in many high-earning professions, and engineering is no exception. Most engineering students pursue bachelor’s degrees, and the average engineer’s student debt falls roughly in line with the national average of $35,173.    While engineers work hard to earn their degrees, the payoff is oh, so worthwhile. The average entry-level salary for engineers is $57,506, and the average salary across all experience levels is $79,000. This varies by the type of engineering you choose, as well. Big data engineers are among the highest-paid in 2020, with a median salary of $155,000.   Engineering students are often top candidates for student loan refinancing because of their low debt-to-income ratios. Here are a few more things you should consider refinancing your engineering student loans:  

Benefits of Student Loan Refinancing for Engineers

Student loan refinancing is a strategy that can help engineers better manage and pay off debt. When you refinance your engineering student loans, a private lender will “purchase” your debt from your original lenders. You can request rate quotes from several different lenders, then refinance with the one that offers you the most competitive rate. Decreasing your interest rate means you’ll pay less over the life of the loan.   Here are just a few of the benefits of student loan refinancing for engineers:
  • Ability to consolidate student loans into one monthly payment
  • Option to choose between fixed and variable student loan refinancing interest rates 
  • Chance to earn a lower interest rate, potentially lower than federal student loans 
  • Opportunity to change your student loan repayment term
  To see how much you could save by refinancing your engineering student loans with Education Loan Finance, try our Student Loan Refinance Calculator.*  

How to Refinance Engineering Student Loans

Refinancing your student loans is normally a quick and simple process, and you can apply in minutes at home. If you’re curious about the process of refinancing, take a look at our student loan refinancing guide.   Researching lenders has very few downsides. Most lenders prequalify applicants using a soft credit check, which won’t hurt your credit score. Just know that before you can officially refinance your loans, your lender will likely need to do a hard credit check.   Here are the next steps to take if you’re thinking about refinancing your engineering student loans:
  • Figure out which how much or which loans you’d like to refinance. 
  • Make sure you meet student loan refinancing eligibility requirements.
  • Shop around and compare pre-qualified rates from multiple lenders. 
  • Submit an application to refinance your student loans 
  • Finalize the loan application by reviewing the loan terms & signing the documents provided by the lender. 
 

Alternatives to Pay Off Engineering Student Loans

If student loan refinancing doesn’t seem like the right fit, you have plenty of alternatives to explore. From student loan assistance to student loan forgiveness, engineers may qualify for a variety of repayment options.  

Student Loan Forgiveness for Engineers

  Select engineers may qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF). If you do qualify, you’ll make payments for a specified amount of time, normally 10 years, then the remaining balance will be forgiven. You will, however, still have to pay taxes on the forgiven amount.   Here are a few ways in which engineers may qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness:
  • Working in areas of national need could provide up to $10,000 in loan forgiveness over five years of service
  • Working for a non-profit, government agency, or other eligible employers could provide loan forgiveness after 120 payments (10 years)
  • Working as a teacher could provide up to $17,500 in loan forgiveness if working at a low-income school or other eligible agencies
  If you aren’t sure which is right for you, research student loan refinancing vs. PSLF. While both may help decrease your debt, it’s important to know how they compare before taking the next steps.  

Income-Based Repayment Plans

If you don’t qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness, you may also choose to pursue an income-based repayment plan. These types of plans set a monthly payment as a percentage of your income. Income-based repayment may be a good fit for entry-level engineers who are still working toward higher salaries.   Here are a few types of income-based repayment plans available to engineers:
  • Pay-as-You-Earn (PAYE): PAYE plans are based on a percentage of your adjusted gross income and family size. They are available to individuals who borrowed after 10/1/2007, or those who received eligible Direct Loan disbursements after 10/1/2011.
  • Revised Pay-As-You-Earn (REPAYE): REPAYE plans are similar to PAYE plans, but do not have date restrictions on the loans. They do take your state of residence into consideration, however.
  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR): IBR plans require you to be experiencing financial hardship. If you qualify, they are based on a percentage of your adjusted gross income and family size.
  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR): Many individuals who can’t qualify for PAYE or IBR plans apply for ICR. These start as a percentage of your adjusted gross income, then grow as your income grows.
 

State Student Loan Assistance Programs

Engineers are highly valued in the professional world. Some states and private organizations have created student loan repayment assistance programs for STEM professionals, with the goal of encouraging students to pursue these careers.   If you’re an engineer looking for student loan assistance, here are a few examples of state-driven programs you may be eligible for:
  • Harold Arnold Foundation
  • Wavemaker Fellowship
  • North Dakota DEAL Loans
 

Employer Student Loan Repayment Assistance Programs

Some employers provide student loan repayment assistance as a job benefit, which operates similarly to a 401(k). You designate a certain dollar amount to your student loan payments each month, and your employer matches your contribution up to a cap amount. These types of benefits can help improve employee retention rates while supplying necessary financial aid.  

Refinance Your Engineering Student Loans with ELFI

If you’re ready to refinance your engineering student loans, ELFI can help. By refinancing your engineering student loans with ELFI, you’ll enjoy benefits including:
  • No application fees 
  • No origination fees
  • No penalty for paying loans off early
  • If approved for refinancing, ELFI has a referral bonus program
  Ready to get started? Learn more about student loan refinancing with ELFI and apply today: https://www.elfi.com/student-loan-refinancing/.*  
  Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no­­­ control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.   *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.