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Education Loan Finance Surpasses $1 Billion in Student Loan Refinancing

January 9, 2020

KNOXVILLE, Tenn., — Education Loan Finance (ELFI), a division of SouthEast Bank, announced today the successful funding of over $1 billion in student loan refinancing and consolidation loans. This funding has positively impacted over 14,500 graduates, parents and cosigners. ELFI customers have reported that they are saving an average of $272 every month and should see an average of $13,940 in total savings over the life of their loan. 1

 

Barbara Thomas, Executive Vice President and Head of the Education Loan Finance Division, is passionate about helping college graduates achieve financial wellness and the role ELFI plays in making that happen.

 

“ELFI recognizes the challenges in navigating student loan debt that every college graduate with student loans faces. This milestone, both in terms of the amount we’ve been able to refinance and the savings to our customers, is evidence that consumers who work with ELFI are taking a critical step toward financial wellness and have turned to ELFI to assist them through the refinancing process. ”

 

The ELFI program began offering student loan refinance products in December 2015. “From the beginning, we felt our student loan borrowers deserved transparent information, a smooth digital experience, and to work with a company that has been committed to higher education for decades.” continued Thomas. “I’m proud that we’ve helped over 14,500 student loan borrowers with competitive products, rates and our unique Personal Loan Advisor (PLA) customer service program to guide them through the process.”

 

This achievement is also a significant technology milestone for the ELFI Loan Origination Platform, which has simplified the loan application process as it is 100% digital and online. “We continue to make significant investments in our technology platform and our PLA customer service model to ensure that we stay at the forefront of the student loan landscape and offer what student borrowers need in a way that is easy for them to navigate,” said Thomas.

 

In closing, Thomas added “Our Company’s dedication to serving student loan borrowers is unwavering. We are highly committed to empowering a brighter future for our borrowers and ensure that we are meeting each and every ELFI customer’s needs and student loan refinancing goals by providing a dedicated Personal Loan Advisor to guide them through the loan process. This unique dedication to personalized customer service with student loan expertise can make all the difference to people who are looking for answers and a better way to manage their student loan debt. Our customers have attested to this top rated customer service delivery model time and time again.” As a reflection of this commitment, ELFI maintains an industry leading an “Excellent” 4.8/5 rating as reported by our customers on Trustpilot.com. These ratings can be found on www.trustpilot.com/review/elfi.com

 

The ELFI team celebrates their milestone.

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About Education Loan Finance

Education Loan Finance, a division of SouthEast Bank, is a leading online lender designed to assist borrowers by consolidating and refinancing private and federal student loans into one simple, low-cost loan. Education Loan Finance believes that providing consumers comprehensive refinancing and consolidation options empowers the consumers on their financial journey. To learn more, visit www.elfi.com.

 

About SouthEast Bank

Headquartered in Farragut, Tennessee, SouthEast Bank operates branches throughout East and Middle Tennessee, blending modern amenities with hometown service and decision-making. Our customers enjoy convenient electronic and mobile platforms such as online banking, remote deposit, automatic fraud monitoring, and a worldwide ATM network. In the last decade, SouthEast Bank, along with its holding company, has donated over $20 million to support secondary and post-secondary education in our local communities and universities throughout the state of Tennessee. To learn more about SouthEast Bank, please visit southeastbank.com.

 

 

1Average savings calculations are based on information provided by SouthEast Bank/ Education Loan Finance customers who refinanced their student loans between 2/7/2020 and 2/21/2020. While these amounts represent reported average amounts saved, actual amounts saved will vary depending upon a number of factors.

Young woman holding keys to first home
2020-07-13
Top Finance Tips for First-Time Homebuyers

Buying a new house can be a daunting experience. From getting prequalified, finding the right house, being approved, to coming up with the necessary funds, the whole experience can feel a bit overwhelming. Have no fear – here are ELFI’s top tips for first-time homebuyers to overcome the challenge.

 

Make a Budget

Deciding on a budget before you start shopping will help you choose a home you love that falls within your price range. In building a budget, be sure to consider your total income, as well as necessary expenses like utilities, food, and gas you’ll incur each month in addition to housing costs. As a rule of thumb, you should aim to keep the cost of your mortgage below 25% of your take-home pay.

 

Maintaining a budget is a great way to continue to meet other financial goals, like paying down student loans, saving for a car, or building an emergency fund, while searching for your dream home. If you’re not sure where to start, SouthEast Bank’s fixed and adjustable-rate mortgage calculators can help you determine your initial budget and launch a successful house hunt!

 

Here’s an extra tip. Don’t forget to include closing costs in your final total! Many first-time homebuyers make this mistake and find themselves over-budget at the end of the transaction. Average closing costs fall between 2-5% of the total cost of the home. In some situations, the seller may agree to cover the closing costs, so be sure to consider including that in your home offer as well.

 

Boost Your Credit Score

When you’re considering buying a home, give yourself every advantage by keeping your credit score in great shape. If your credit could use a little extra help, try these tips to polish your score:

  • Make bill payments on time. Late payments are a credit score’s worst enemy, as payment history is the most heavily weighted category in determining your score. Set reminders in your phone, leave yourself sticky notes, and do whatever it takes to get those payments submitted by their deadlines!
  • Slow down the spending. Hitting your credit limit can also damage your score, so be careful to use different forms of payment, like cash or debit, or cut down on unnecessary spending.
  • Don’t close that card. Closing lines of credit can be damaging to your score, even if they’re linked to cards you rarely or never use. Instead, put your card in a safe place and use it for occasional transactions, or set it up on autopay for a small monthly expense. If you do need to cancel the card, take these steps from U.S. News to avoid significantly dropping your credit score.

If you found this advice helpful and you’d like to take a deeper dive into your credit score, check out ELFI’s blog, “How to Build Credit: A Beginner’s Guide.”

 

Understand Your Mortgage

Buying a house is a big decision, but understanding your mortgage will give you the confidence to take the next steps in finding your perfect home! Here are a few ways to determine which mortgage loan is right for you:

  • Choose a mortgage term that fits your budget. Mortgages generally have terms of 15, 20, or 30 years, meaning the length of time it takes to repay them.
    • If your goal is to keep your monthly payment low, then opt for a longer-term loan, which will allow you to make smaller payments over time. While long-term loans are great for lowering your monthly payment, however, they increase the number of total payments and result in more interest than short-term mortgages.
    • On the reverse side, short-term mortgages have higher monthly payments but less total interest. Either way, the important decision is choosing the term that allows you to remain within your budget and keep your financial goals on track!
  • Find the right mortgage lender. All too often, first-time homebuyers make the mistake of stopping their mortgage search after being approved by one lender. Instead, take the time to reach out to multiple lenders and determine who can offer the best rate. By being selective, you could save thousands of dollars over the life of your loan.
  • Get preapproved by your top lenders. After you’ve decided which lenders you’re most interested in working with, show sellers you’re serious by getting preapproved for a loan. A preapproval letter shows that a lender has researched your credit and financial history and determined they’d be willing to offer you a mortgage loan.
 

Choose the Right Insurance

Once you’ve built your budget, boosted your score, and finished your mortgage research, it’s time to close on your dream home!

 

As part of the closing process, you’ll be required to purchase homeowners insurance. Like mortgage lenders, several companies offer homeowners insurance with different rates and benefits. Take the time to research which insurance plan is right for you to ensure you’re receiving the best protection.

 

If you could use some expert help, reach out to SouthEast Insurance Services1. Their experienced representatives can compare rates from more than 40 major lenders to be sure you’re getting the most for your money. Visit them here to learn more to receive a complimentary, no-obligation quote.

 

Congratulations! You’ve done your research and found a dream home within your budget. With our first-time house hunter tips, you’ve also built your credit and received competitive rates on your mortgage and insurance. Now, it’s time to enjoy the home you’ve worked so hard for.

 

At ELFI, we’re proud to support your financial goals and are here to help you along every step of the way. Check back soon for new blog posts, and happy house hunting!

 
 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

 

1SouthEast Insurance Services Products

  • are not a deposit
  • are not FDIC-insured
  • are not insured by any federal government agency
  • are not guaranteed by the bank
  • may go down in value
 

Insurance products are not insured by FDIC or any Federal Government Agency; are not a deposit of, or guaranteed by the Bank or any Bank Affiliate; and may lose value. Any insurance required as a condition of the extension of credit by SouthEast Bank need not be purchased from our Agency but may, without affecting the approval of the application for an extension of credit, be purchased from an agent or insurance company of the customer's choice.

2020-07-13
How to Save for Retirement While Making Student Loan Payments

If you have student loans, you know how your debt can affect your ability to pursue your other financial goals, especially saving for retirement.    According to a recent survey by TIAA, 84% of responding adults said that their student loans negatively impacted the amount they were able to save for retirement. For those who aren’t saving for retirement at all, 26% said their student loan balances were why they couldn’t afford to do so.    However, putting off saving for your retirement is a costly mistake. It’s important to balance saving for your future with paying down student loan debt now. If you’re struggling to manage both priorities, here’s how to save for retirement while keeping up with your loan payments.  

Why you need to save for retirement now

When it comes to saving for retirement, the earlier you begin saving, the better. Compound interest and the power of annual returns can help your money grow over time. The longer you wait to start saving for retirement, the more you’ll have to invest your own money to have enough saved to retire comfortably.   For example, let’s say Jen begins saving for retirement at the age of 25. She contributes $250 per month into her retirement account, and her average annual return is 9%. By the time Jen reaches the age of 67, she’s contributed just $126,000 into the account, but her retirement account is worth $1,406,746.   By contrast, Jen’s friend Stephanie puts off saving for retirement until she pays off her student loans and doesn’t start contributing to her retirement until she’s 35. She starts putting $500 per month toward her retirement fund — double what Jen contributes each month. Like Jen, Stephanie earns an average annual return of 9%, but by the age of 67, her retirement fund is worth only $1,108,257. Stephanie contributed $192,000 of her own money — nearly $70,000 more than Jen — but her retirement account is worth approximately $300,000 less than Jen’s because Stephanie got a later start.   Chart showing the impact of saving for retirement earlier  

Retirement savings options

If you’re not sure how to save for retirement, here are some popular retirement plans.   

401(k) 

A 401(k) plan is an employer-sponsored retirement plan, meaning it’s a benefit offered through your job. With a 401(k), you invest a portion of your pre-tax salary in the investments you choose. Your contributions and the earnings are not taxed until you withdraw from the account.  

401(3)b 

401(3)b plans are very similar to 401(k) plans, but they’re offered to employees of non-profit organizations, churches, public schools, and universities. You make contributions to your retirement plan on a pre-tax basis, and your contributions and earnings aren’t taxed until you make withdrawals.  

IRAs

Another great option is to open an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) on your own. There are two options: a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA.  

Traditional IRA

Anyone can contribute to a Traditional IRA, regardless of income. With an IRA, your earnings can grow tax-deferred, meaning you only pay taxes on your gains when you make withdrawals in retirement. Your contributions may be tax-deductible depending on your income level and if you have access to an employer-sponsored plan.  

Roth IRA

If you meet the income restrictions, a Roth IRA may be a useful option. With a Roth IRA, you make contributions with after-tax dollars. Why is that a good thing? While your contributions aren’t tax-deductible, your earnings and withdrawals are tax-free. And, you can take out the money you contribute to your Roth IRA — but not your earnings — before you reach retirement age without paying any penalties, so your Roth IRA can double as an emergency fund in a pinch.  

How to save for retirement while paying student loans

Finding a balance between saving for retirement and paying down student loan debt can be tricky, but it can be done if you follow these three steps:  

1. Make the minimum payments on all of your student loans

It’s important to stay current on all of your debt to maintain and protect your credit score and prevent racking up costly late fees. Keep making all of the required minimum payments on your federal and private student loans to avoid falling behind and entering student loan default.*  

2. If your employer offers matching contributions, contribute enough to earn the full match

If you have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan like a 401(k) or 403(b) and your employer offers matching contributions, contribute enough to your account to qualify for the full match. Otherwise, you’ll lose out on free money that is a key part of your compensation package. Over time, skipping the match could cost you thousands of dollars.   For example, let’s say you make $40,000 per year, and your employer will match 100% of your contributions, up to 5% of your salary. That means if you contribute $2,000 per year to your retirement plan — 5% of your salary — your employer will match your contribution, giving you an additional $2,000 per year toward your retirement fund.   If you didn’t take advantage of the match while you were with that employer for five years, you’d miss out on $10,000. But the long-term consequences are even worse. If that money earned an average 9% annual return, in 30 years, that $10,000 would be worth over $147,000. That’s why it’s so important to take advantage of employer matching contributions if they’re available to you.   If your employer doesn’t offer a match, or if you don’t have access to an employer-sponsored plan, contribute to a Traditional IRA or Roth IRA  instead.  

3. Tackle your high-interest student loan debt

If you have extra money left over each month, put it toward high-interest student loan debt, meaning loans with an interest rate of over 5%. You can also consider student loan refinancing to lower your interest rate and reduce your monthly payment.   By refinancing your student loans, you can save money and free up more money in your monthly budget to save for retirement. Use the student loan refinance calculator to see how much you can save.*  

The bottom line 

When it comes to saving for retirement while paying student loans, you should develop a balanced strategy. Aim to both save for retirement and pay down your student loans at the same time. By taking advantage of employer contributions and tackling high-interest debt, you can improve your finances and build a secure future.  
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.    Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
Millennial reading news about student loans in coffee shop.
2020-07-10
This Week in Student Loans: July 10, 2020

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

  This week in student loans:
US Capitol

GOP Concerns Over Costs Could Limit Student Loan Relief In Next Stimulus

GOP Senate leaders are showing increasing concern about the costs of additional economic relief, particularly when it comes to student loan relief, as they weigh a second stimulus bill.

Source: Forbes

 

State Senate Chambers

Democrats Fail to Override Trump Veto on Student Loan Policy

This Friday, House Democrats were unable to override the Trump Administration's veto on a proposal to reverse the Education Department's strict policy on loan forgiveness for students misled by for-profit colleges. The House voted 238-173 in support of the override measure, coming up short of the two-thirds majority needed to send it to the Senate.

Source: ABC News

 

question mark

Study Finds Gen Z Borrowers Are Unaware of COVID-19 Student Loan Relief Programs

While the CARES Act allowed those with federal student loans to pause payments until September, a recent survey from Student Debt Crisis shows that Gen Z borrowers, in particular, were the least aware of the relief program.  

Source: CNBC

 

note saying pay off debt

Author Shares Her Big 'Wake Up Call' That Led Her to Pay Off $81,00 in Student Debt

35-year-old Melanie Lockert, the author of "Dear Debt," shared with CNBS the story of how she was able to pay off $81,000 in student loan debt over 9 years, with her big wake up call coming five years into repayment.  

Source: CNBC

    That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.  
 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.