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Scholarships to Save Money on Student Loans for College

February 13, 2019

People have all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for what to do with their lives. From those passionate about teaching and making a difference to talented analysts who want to help steer the ship. There are so many incredible careers to choose from, but once you pick the path it’s time to think about school. How do you make that dream of going to school a reality?

 

Financing an education can be challenging, but there are options and ways, even if you don’t have a nest egg for tuition. One option that is worth looking into is finding scholarships to save you money on student loans for college. Have you checked out what’s available? Here are some things to consider in your search.

 

Look for scholarships based on need.

All types of people from all different backgrounds go to college, but some are at a disadvantage when it comes time to pay for school. For instance, some students can’t get student loans for college if they don’t have co-signers but might qualify for federal loan programs that don’t have the same requirements. Some scholarships aim to help these people specifically—like people who are more likely to need aid because they’re non-traditional students with children or over a certain age, or they are the first generation in their family to attend a university. There are also options for students who have been on other government aid programs as children or teenagers in a low-income family.

 

What kind of scholarship fits your abilities?

Lots of people receive scholarships for any number of abilities—either because they are gifted academically or because they excel at a sport or activity. Talk to your school counselor or other college resources about your grades and test scores. It might be worth it to retake something like the SAT if you are pretty close to qualifying for academic scholarships. If you’re just starting to look at scholarships, now probably isn’t the time to become a master volleyball player or flutist, but scholarships for activities like those do exist! So if you are looking for ways to save money on student loans for college by getting a scholarship, don’t forget to search based on your extracurricular. Here are some common scholarship types provided based on extracurricular.

 

Community Service Scholarships

Have you been busy volunteering? If so, you’ll want to look into community service scholarships. Many institutions hope to have students who make a powerful impact in the community. This scholarship is a great option as there is no special talent required it just takes time and dedication to complete.

 

Now we’re not saying to volunteer only for a scholarship, we’re just saying to try it out. Who knows, you may even like volunteering and actually have fun and make new friends!  In addition to making new friends, having fun, and saving money on student loans for college volunteering can expose you to new environments and things that you may have otherwise been unaware of. If you’re volunteering with an organization, be sure to ask them if they offer a scholarship.

 

Segal Americorps Education Award

Do Something Scholarships

Youth Changing The World

Tylenol® Future Care Scholarship

 

Creative Scholarships

Creative scholarships are just what you would think they are. These are scholarships provided to users for unique and creative creations. These scholarships consist of anything from designing a logo to playing a musical instrument. When you’re applying to a creative scholarship be sure to include an impressive portfolio of your additional work.

 

Doodle for Google

Create-A-Greeting-Card Scholarship

Stuck at Prom Scholarship Contest

Shout It Out Scholarship

 

 

Academic Scholarships

Academic scholarships are the most common. These scholarships are often based on your GPA, leadership, and ACT or SAT scores. Typically academic scholarships are provided by the institution but private academic scholarships can be another great way to pay for college. On your application, you’ll want to be sure to include any additional activities you are involved in. Some private academic-based scholarships will require the student to pursue a specific type of degree.

 

Shell Incentive Fund Scholarship

USRA Scholarship Awards

Alpha Chi Omega Foundation Scholarships

SouthEast Bank Scholars Program

 

 

Look for fruitful memberships.

If you or your parents are members of a fraternal organization, church/denomination, or if you work in a particular industry you may qualify for a scholarship. Some companies even offer scholarships to employee families. If you were a member of an applicable student group in high school, then you may qualify for a scholarship based on this. There are even scholarships for people who have survived cancer. Talk to your parents and other family members about memberships you may not be aware of!

 

You might qualify for employer-sponsored scholarships

In an increasingly competitive market, employers are doing more to find and retain top talent. Do you work for a company that offers scholarships? Check out this list of companies that offer scholarships. Everywhere from fast food restaurants and service jobs to large corporations offer financial aid and scholarships to their employees. If you’re not sure, talk to your HR person and see if you qualify. It’s worth a try!

 

Get the scoop on where to search.

School counselors are the first place to check for scholarship opportunities. You might be able to apply for a local scholarship from a company in your region through your high school, or your college or university of choice might have scholarships for attendees. You can also take your search to the Internet and look for ideas, search based on your specific requirements or areas of interest, and get information on how to apply. Check out this scholarship search tool from the Department of Education.

 

If you’re looking to save money on student loans for college, make sure that you check for scholarship opportunities every semester. Student loans can be a great tool and easily manageable if you’re informed, so don’t be afraid to ask questions and check out all of your options. Do your best to decrease the amount you need to take out in student loans to pay for college.

 

FDIC Backed and Why You Should Care

 

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2019-09-19
Adulting Tips: 8 Resume Keys to Help you Score that Next Job

Whether you are in the process of heading off to college, or you are graduated and looking to continue your path to financial freedom through student loan refinancing – the work ethic you developed to get into and through school will be a major part of your continued success. But as you enter or progress through your career, the way you present yourself holds even more weight. It’s time to start thinking of your personal brand. Your resume is a key component of how your personal brand comes across to employers. It’s your first opportunity to impress hiring managers and will determine whether you get that in-person interview. For these reasons, it’s essential that is promotes you in the best light possible. Follow these steps (and avoid these mistakes) to achieve the perfect resume.  

1. Customize it.

Submitting a vague, boring resume is a sure way to get yours moved to the bottom of the stack, or out of the pile altogether. No matter where you are in your career path, whether looking for a part-time job in high school, an internship in college, or applying for a job after school, you should always take the time to customize your resume to the job you’re applying for (check out Huffington Post’s tips for customizing your resume). But remember, a little goes a long way here.  

2. What does your email address say about you? 

Your prospective employer shouldn’t look at your resume and think “this person is cool.” In fact, you probably don’t even want them thinking twice about it. You should always avoid email addresses that use nicknames, profanity, or have humorous connotations. Use a simple email address that consists of variations of your first, middle, and last name. We love the tips on creating a professional email address from Hubspot.  

3. Organize it.

You want the employer’s eyes to be drawn to the most important parts of your resume – so be sure to highlight them and make them prominent. If you’re fresh out of school with no work experience, highlight your academic accomplishments; if you didn’t have a great GPA in school but have good work experience, highlight the experience first. Know what your selling point is and prioritize it over your supporting facts.  

4. Don’t be passive or lazy in your use of language.

Showing laziness in your resume? A recipe for unemployment. Be sure to explain your duties at each job, and don’t sell yourself short. Even if two jobs are similar in nature, be sure to express how the experiences were different because it will exemplify some versatility. Using statements like: "same as above" and "etc." when writing your resume shows poor effort and undersells your experience.   

5. Choose the right font.

Be sophisticated, not flashy. Choose a standard font that will be readable by the hiring manager on their phone, laptop, tablet, or any operating system. Your resume may be scanned by automated applicant tracking software, so using a basic font is probably best. Some common examples of “resume-safe” fonts are:
  • Calibri
  • Arial
  • Garamond
  • Georgia
  • Helvetica
Check out some more tips on choosing font size and weight from Indeed.  

6. Show that you are detail oriented. 

Typos and other errors are one of the most common blunders that would cause a hiring manager to discard a resume. Submitting a resume that has typos only confirms that your attention to detail is lacking. Don’t be that person. Just like your credit score can reflect your attention to detail in your personal finances as you seek out student loans or to refinance student loans, your resume is that short summary of your professional experience. Don’t let a typo drop your score with your future employer.   

7. Why you? 

Most importantly you want to make an impact on a hiring manager. You need to put emphasis on your accomplishments. Think of instances where you achieved success at previous jobs, on classroom projects, or during extracurricular activities. Your goal is to demonstrate measurable successes to the greatest extent possible. Maybe you were you able to help a previous employer increase revenue by 10%. Or you created marketing campaigns in your college courses that five actual companies were able to use and implement. Or you organized a fundraising event that raised funds for a charity in your community. For some inspiration, here’s JobScan’s list of examples of accomplishments you can put on your resume.  

8. Algorithms are everywhere.

Many employers use electronic databases to store applicant resumes, and scanning tools are programmed to look for key terms in your resume. Using the right keywords may help you get noticed and earn an interview. Use the job posting or description to help you determine which keywords, such as specialized degrees, languages, skills, etc, to include on your resume. We hope this Adulting Tip lets helps you score that next big career move. Education Loan Finance is here to help you along your financial journey from funding your college career to refinancing student loans – we want to empower your path to financial freedom.   Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.   NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
2019-09-16
What I Would Have Told Myself in College: Barbara Thomas

  Barbara Thomas, Executive Vice President of Education Loan Finance (ELFI) provides some financial advice to college students based on her own experiences in college.   Hello, I’m Barbara Thomas. For most, like me, my college days were a great experience that lead to incredible personal growth. I had a marvelous sense of freedom and made many new friends. However, I have spent much time reflecting on what I would do differently if I could begin my college life all over again, given what I know now. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, isn’t it? So here’s my advice to all of you who are preparing to enter college, or are currently in your freshman or sophomore years.

Choose an Affordable College

When looking for the right college, don’t get beguiled by a famous name and a beautiful campus. And, while a state-of-the-art fitness center or an Olympic-size swimming pool might be important if you’re an athlete, most of the time you will be paying for them in higher college fees. Instead, make sure to keep your eyes on finances, as affordability should be a top concern. Considering the fact that many students end up taking on sizeable student loan debt, keep in mind that you (most likely) won’t be living on that beautiful campus in your late 20s or 30s.

Rethink Your Path to the Best Education.

Just because a college is more expensive, doesn’t
necessarily mean that it’s better than one that costs less. You should look upon college as an investment in your future. Consider what the return on investment (ROI) from your college education will look like. In other words, analyze which college is likely to provide you with the most bang for your buck. Here’s a report from U.S. News & World Report that gives you the ROI of different colleges.

Look at Alternatives to a Four-Year College.

If you find out that college is not the best path for you, it can turn out to be an expensive mistake. Keep in mind that dropping out of college won’t make your student loans disappear. So before you enroll in a college, consider these alternatives:
  • Take a gap year to earn money to put toward going to college and give yourself more time to decide what you want to do.
  • Consider attending a trade school to learn a valuable skill with high earnings potential.
  • Spend two years at a community college. Attending a community college can help you save on tuition. However, if you plan to transfer to a college of your choice, be sure to do some checking. Find out how many transfer students are accepted and how many of your community college credits can be used.
Do your research and crunch the numbers to make sure you’re making the best choice.

Earn More While in School

A survey of millennials found that earning money while in college was the number one thing that participants wished they had done (or done more of). This reflects the increasing financial cost that goes along with obtaining a college degree. The College Board estimated that in 2017 (updated figures are available), the average student loan debt upon graduation was $28,500. Keep in mind that a heavy debt load is going to affect your financial future – your ability to buy a home, start a family, and save for retirement. Apart from financial considerations, there is no better way to acquire real job skills than to hold down a job and learn about its demands firsthand. Employers know this, which is why previous work experience is the most popular measure to assess job candidates, even those straight out of college.

Research Ways To Lower Your Monthly Student Loan Payments

So, you’ve done everything right - you chose the higher education path that was right for you, and you have landed an interesting job. Now, what about those student loan payments? Are they weighing you down and preventing you from leading the life that you had envisioned after college? ELFI has a solution to your problem – it’s called refinancing. You can close out your original loan and take out a new one with a lower interest rate and/or a longer term. This can significantly lower your monthly loan payments. Get in touch with us to see how we can help you!  

Learn More About Student Loan Refinancing With ELFI

  Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.
2019-08-03
How Does Student Loan Interest Work?

When you take out a student loan, you will not just be paying back the amount you borrowed – the lender will also charge you interest. The easiest way to think of interest is that it’s the cost paid by you to borrow money. Whether you take out a private student loan or a federal student loan, you will be charged interest on your loan until it is repaid in full. So, when you have finished paying off your loan, you will have paid back the original sum you borrowed (your original principal), plus you will have paid a percentage of the amount you owed (interest). Properly understanding the way that student loan interest affects your loan is imperative for you to be able to manage your debt effectively.  

The Promissory Note

When a student loan is issued, the borrower agrees to the terms of the loan by signing a document called a promissory note. These terms include:
  • Disbursement date: The date the funds are issued to you and interest begins to accrue.
  • Amount borrowed: The total dollar amount borrowed on the loan.
  • Interest rate: How much the loan will cost you.
  • How interest accrues: Interest may be charged on a daily or monthly basis.
  • First payment date: The date when you are expected to make your first loan payment.
  • Payment schedule: When you are required to make payment and how many payments you have to make.
 

How Different Types of Student Loans are Affected by Interest Rates

  • Government-Subsidized loan: If you are the recipient of a government-subsidized direct loan, the government will pay your interest while you are in school. This means that your loan balance will not increase. After graduation, the interest becomes your responsibility.
  • Parent PLUS Loan: There are no government-subsidized loans for parents, and regular repayments are scheduled to begin 60 days after the loan is disbursed.
  • Unsubsidized Loan: The majority of students will have unsubsidized loans where interest is charged from day one. If you have this type of loan, sometimes a lender will not require you to make payments while you are still in school. However, the interest will accrue, and when you graduate you’ll find yourself with a loan balance higher than the one you started with. This is known as capitalization. 
Here’s an example: In your freshman year, you borrow $7,000 at 3.85%. By the time you graduate in four years, this will have grown to $8,078 – an increase of $1,078. Here’s the math: 7,000 × 0.0385 × 4 = $1,078 (
Click here for ELFI’s handy accrued interest calculator.)  

How is Student Loan Interest Calculated?

When you begin to make loan payments, the amount you pay is made up of the amount you borrowed (the principal) and interest payments. When you make a payment, interest is paid first. The remainder of your payment is applied to your principal balance and reduces it.    Let’s suppose you borrow $10,000 with a 7% annual interest rate and a 10-year term. Using ELFI’s helpful loan payment calculator, we can estimate your monthly payment at $116 and the interest you will pay over the life of the loan at $3,933. Here’s how to determine how much of your monthly payment of $116 is made up of interest.   1. Calculate your daily interest rate (also known as your interest rate factor). Divide your interest rate by 365 (the number of days in the year).  

.07/365 = 0.00019, or 0.019%

    2. Calculate the amount of interest your loan accrues each day. Multiply your outstanding loan balance by your daily interest rate.  

$10,000 x 0.00019 = $1.90

  3. Calculate your monthly interest payment. Multiply the dollar amount of your daily interest by the number of days since your last payment.  

$1.90 x 30 = $57

 

How is Student Loan Interest Applied?

As you continue to make payments on your student loan, your principal and the amount of accrued interest will decrease. Lower interest charges means that a larger portion of your payments will be applied to your principal. Paying down the principal on a loan is known as amortization.  

How Accrued Interest Impacts Your Student Loan Payments

The smart money approach is avoiding capitalized interest building up on your loan while you are in school. This is because choosing not to pay interest while in school means you will owe a lot more when you come out. The more you borrow, the longer you are in school, and the higher your interest rates are, the more profound the impact of capitalization will be.  

How to Find the Best Student Loan

When looking for the best student loan, you naturally want the lowest interest rate available. With a lower interest rate, the same monthly payment pays down more of your loan principal and you will be out of debt more quickly. Talk to ELFI about our private student loan offerings by giving us a call today!  

Learn More About ELFI Student Loans

  Terms and conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.   NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.