ELFI customer service will be closed on Saturday, July 4 in observance of Independence Day. Our offices will reopen on Sunday, July 5.
X
×
TAGS
For College
Student Loan Refinancing
Student Loans

The Average Cost of College

November 18, 2019

When it comes to shopping, many of us have champagne taste and a beer budget. We shop with our eyes and our hearts before taking a peek at the price tag. The process of selecting a college is no different. We make decisions based on location, athletic teams, available programs of study, greek life, or even where our friends apply. Unfortunately, for many people, the cost of college lives at the bottom of the checklist, despite being a vital factor to consider. 

 

The average cost of college for the 2019-2020 school year, is $21,950 for public, four-year, in-state colleges and $49,870 for private universities. This is an increase of 2.6% and 3.3%, respectively, over the year prior, alone. 

 

Without question, college is expensive, and very few people are talented enough to get an athletic or academic scholarship to completely or partially cover the cost of education. An even smaller number of people are able to pay for a degree out-of-pocket. That leaves the majority of college students and their families to rely on loans to pay the bills.  

 

Further complicating matters, a lot goes into the cost of college, including your residency status, level of degree you seek (bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral), where you live (on-campus, alone, or with a house full of roommates), and even how much you eat or how you commute to campus. 

 

To help you understand where you can save, as well as how you can cover expenses with financial aid, let’s dig into what comprises the average cost of college. 

 

Tuition

Average Cost: $10,440 (public) | $36,880 (private)*

Tuition is the amount you pay your university to enroll in classes. The total changes based on the number of credit hours you take and if you take courses with additional charges like science labs or residential academic programs that let you attend smaller classes in your dorm. Offers like the Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) can help students save money by providing in-state tuition to out-of-state students. Despite programs like this, the average cost of college is always rising because tuition increases each year based on inflation, school budgets, and a variety of other factors. 

 

Mandatory fees are lumped into tuition and include contributions toward campus construction and access to things like:

  • Student rec center
  • Athletic events
  • Career services
  • Student activities
  • Computer labs
  • Bus passes
  • Etc. 

 

Room and Board

Average Cost: $11,510 (public) | $12,000 (private)*

Many colleges require you to live on-campus for at least your first year of attendance. The benefit of this requirement is that you’re close to classes and resources, including dining halls and bodegas that can be paid for with your room and board fees. These costs aren’t typically part of the bill for community colleges or schools with a high population of daily commuters. However, students will still need to cover living expenses like rent, utilities, and groceries if they chose not to live at home with their parents and amounts vary based on eating habits and geographic locations. For example, rent in California is higher than in Tennessee and the general cost of living in an urban setting is higher than it is at a rural school. 

 

Books

Average Cost: $1,240 (public and private)*

Books can be a secret killer when it comes to college expenses. No one ever anticipates the sticker shock associated with their first $300 textbook. These costs also include necessary technology like tablets or laptops for note-taking and essay writing. It also can include special supplies like graphite pencils and drawing paper for art majors or scrubs or stethoscopes for nursing majors. These semesterly shopping trips can do real damage to your checking account and add to the average cost of college. 

 

Transportation

Average Cost: $1,230 (public) | $1,060 (private)*

So far, we’ve focused on what you’ll need to pay to get by on campus, but we haven’t talked about the expenses associated with getting to campus. These costs impact resident and commuter students and range from airplane tickets and bus fare to parking passes and tanks of gas.  

 

Financial Aid 

When factoring the average cost of college, the other side of the ledger is represented by financial aid in the form of scholarships and need-based grants. With these awards, that don’t have to be repaid, the cost of tuition is reduced. 

 

In addition to scholarships and grants, federal and private loans are available to help cover the cost of college. Private lenders offer student loan options for undergraduate students, graduate students, and even parents. Loans cover everything from tuition to personal expenses that you’ll occur during your college years, like cell phone bills, clothes, laundry, or even a bed for your apartment. The biggest thing to keep in mind when taking out loans is to borrow only what you’ll need. It’s necessary to have money to pay bills while you’re a full-time student, but borrowing too much can put you in a bind when it comes time to pay back those loans.

 


 

* Source: https://research.collegeboard.org/pdf/trends-college-pricing-2019-full-report.pdf

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2020-07-02
Should You Keep Paying Federal Student Loans During CARES Act Suspensions?

You probably already know that the CARES Act has suspended Federal student loan payments for the time being. Until September 30th, you aren’t required to make payments, and the interest rate of your loans is set to 0%. This is primarily to help those with student loans who are struggling during these uncertain times. If your student loans are in forbearance due to the CARES Act suspensions, you have several repayment options based on your financial goals.

 

Option 1: Take Advantage of That 0% Interest

Normally, when making extra payments on student loans, your money is first attributed to any collections charges or late fees, then to accrued interest, then to the principal itself.

 

With the current 0% interest rates, however, if your account doesn’t have any fees or charges, you’ll save some money at that step. The more you can reduce your principal balance, the more money you’ll save over time in interest.

 

For example, let’s say you have $25,000 in student loans at a 4% interest rate and you want to pay it off in the next 10 years. Over that period, you accrue $5,373.54 in interest. However, if you take advantage of the CARES Act 0% interest, you can change the course of your repayment.

 

For instance, if you continue to pay your student loans during this period, the payments will be attributed straight to principal and will save you about $300 in accrued interest over the course of your repayment.

 

Option 2: Wait Until September And Resume Payments

If the coronavirus has affected your finances, don’t worry about paying down your student loans too quickly. Instead, use this time to get your other debts under control. Focus on paying back higher interest rate debt, like credit card debt, which will impact your long-term financial health.

 

Option 3: Refinance and Take Advantage of Low Interest Rates

During this time, many student loan refinancing companies are offering low interest rates. If you’re locked into an unfavorable rate, this would be a great time to consider refinancing student loans to save on interest costs.

 

This is an especially great option for borrowers with private loans, as these types of loans aren’t currently receiving any type of federal forbearance benefit. For a personalized look at how refinancing could improve your financial health, check out the ELFI Student Loan Refinancing Calculator.*

 

So, should you keep paying federal student loans during the CARES Act suspensions? The answer depends on your unique goals. Whether you choose to pay your federal loans, take care of other expenses, or refinance your student loans, this is a great opportunity to eliminate some additional debt before the September 30 deadline. Happy saving!

 
 

*Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.

 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

Coronavirus (COVID-19)
2020-06-26
Looking Back on How COVID-19 Has Impacted Student Loans

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected everyone’s life in one way or another. For many Americans, this included their student loans. Whether you are unable to make payments or benefiting from a lower interest rate, it can be confusing to know how all of the ways the pandemic may be affecting your situation.    By Caroline Farhat   The impact on student loans is different depending on whether you have federal or private student loans. If you do not know what type of loans you have, you can log in to your account on the StudentAid.gov site that will show you any federal loans you have borrowed. If you think you have any private loans, be sure to request your free credit report to see the information on them.  

COVID-19 Impact on Federal Student Loans

On March 27, 2020,
the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was signed into law. The CARES Act impacts most federal student loans, but not all. Perkins Loans and FFELP loans that are not owned by the U.S. Department of Education are not included in the benefits provided by the Act. Most federal student loans are covered. Here’s how the CARES Act affects all other federal student loans:   

Administrative Forbearance

The covered student loans were automatically placed on administrative forbearance from March 13, 2020, through September 30, 2020. This means no payments are required during that period and no action was required to receive this benefit. If you decide to make payments during this time the amount will go towards the principal of the loan after the interest accrued as of March 13 is paid. Any payments made after March 13 through September 30 can be requested for a refund.    

Interest Rate

The interest rate on the covered federal loans is temporarily set at 0% from March 13 through September 30. You do not have to do anything to receive the reduced interest rate. This reduced interest rate is beneficial because your loans will not be increasing during the paused period.    

Student Loan Forgiveness

The non-payments during the March 13 to September 30 timeframe count towards payments made for student loan forgiveness. This is especially beneficial if you are in the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program. As long as you are employed at a qualifying employer, you do not have to make any payments during the period and the months will still qualify towards your required number of payments. 
  • For example: if you have 48 payments remaining until you are eligible for loan forgiveness under the PSLF and you do not make any payments from March 13 to September 30, your required number of payments until forgiveness will be reduced to 42 payments.
 

Collection on Defaulted Loans

If you currently have federal defaulted student loans, the collection on those loans is paused from March 13 through September 30, 2020. You should not receive letters or phone calls regarding the collection of these debts. In addition, your tax refund, social security benefits and wages cannot be garnished during this time. However, keep in mind after this paused period, collections will resume on your defaulted loan.  

Rehabilitating Defaulted Loan

If you are in a rehabilitation agreement for your defaulted loan, the suspended payments will count toward your rehabilitation during the suspended payments period.  

Employer Educational Assistance Programs

The CARES Act allows employers to contribute up to $5,250 per year towards an employee’s student loans tax-free through December 31, 2020. This is a savings for the employee who can have extra money paid on their student loans with no taxes owed on the money. This provision of the Act allows employers to use student loan assistance as a benefit to offer to employees, while not having to pay payroll taxes on the money. Corporations looking to add this benefit for their employees can find out more information here.  

COVID-19 Impact on Private Student Loans

Private student loans are not covered by the CARES Act, however, you may still be eligible for some relief if you have been financially impacted by COVID-19.  

Lender Relief Measures

Many lenders are providing relief measures, such as forbearance, in which you will not be required to make payments for a certain period. Every lender is different so be sure to check with your provider if you need any assistance.  

State Relief

Some states’ attorney general offices have made agreements with private student loan lenders to provide relief to borrowers impacted by the pandemic. As of this writing, nine states plus Washington D.C. have made agreements with lenders. Some of the benefits in the agreements may include:
  • 90 days forbearance, which means no payments would be due 
  • Waiver of late fees 
  • No negative reporting to credit bureaus 
If you do not live in a state that is helping to provide relief, refinancing your student loans may be a great option for you. Refinancing can reduce your monthly payment to make it more affordable for you. Refinancing allows you to borrow a new loan to pay off your old student loan. The new loan can save you money by having a lower interest rate or obtaining a new loan with a longer term length to lower the payments, but extend the number of months you have to pay. Check out our Student Loan Refinance Calculator to see how much you may be able to save.*     During this unprecedented time, it’s helpful to have some relief from student loan payments if you are unable to make them. Explore all your options to see what works best for your financial situation.   
  *Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.   Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
student loan news
2020-06-18
This Week in Student Loans: June 18, 2020

Please note: Education Loan Finance does not endorse or take positions on any political matters that are mentioned. Our weekly summary is for informational purposes only and is solely intended to bring relevant news to our readers.

  This week in student loans:
photo saying legislation

NAACP And 60 Other Groups Call On Congress To Cancel Student Debt

After the federal government has provided student loan relief to all federal student loan borrowers through the CARES Act, a coalition of over 60 organizations including the NAACP, American Federation of Teachers, and the National Consumer Law Center are now calling Congress to cancel student loan debt altogether in their next stimulus package.  

Source: Forbes

 

low rates on federal student loans

Student Loans: 3 Ways To Get A Lower Interest Rate

This Forbes article lays out the three ways to get a lower interest rate on your student loans, covering options such as refinancing, borrowing a new student loan, or even switching to a variable rate loan.  

Source: Forbes

 

question mark

How to Pay Off Student Loans When You’re Broke

With many individuals struggling to pay off their student loans due to lack or income or overwhelming expenses, this Fox Business article lays out options for paying down student debt when faced with difficult financial circumstances.  

Source: Fox Business

 

student debt in america

How Student Loans Became a $1.6 Trillion Problem

With the cost of college increasing almost 25% in the past decade and total student loan debt reaching $1.6 trillion, this CNBC video offers a historical view of the path the U.S. took to arrive at this state.  

Source: CNBC

    That wraps things up for this week! Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter, or LinkedIn for more news about student loans, refinancing, and achieving financial freedom.  
 

Notice About Third Party Websites: Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – the bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.